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Claybank Cemetery Ozark Alabama

Margaret Claybank Cemetery is located about two miles from Ozark, Alabama on Ozark – Daleville Highway. This cemetery enumeration was performed in 1948 by Eustus Hayes and as such will provide details on headstones which may no longer be present in the cemetery. Lizzie E. Dowling June 25, 1853 – Oct 31, 1938. Wife of N. B. Dowling. N. B. Dowling Aug 15, 1853 – Mar 28, 1938. Hus of Lizzie E. Dowling. Leila Belle Dowling May 26, 1876 – Jan 14, 1933. Dau of S. L. & Sarah Jane Dowling. Samuel L. Dowling Nov 3, 1841 – Jan 15, 1919. Sarah Jane Windham Feb 22, 1839 – June 15, 1925. Wife of Samuel L. Dowling. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now Rev. John Dowling July 20, 1818 – Feb 28, 1900. Son of Rev. Dempsey Dowling. Charlotte Dowling Oct 20, 1888 -. Wife of Rev. John Dowling Sr. Erin Elizabeth Dowling Feb 10, 1902 – Sep 11, 1902 Inf. Dau of R.Y. & Melissa Dowling. Pauline Dowling Feb 13, 1897 June 24, 1899 Inf. Dau of RY & Melissa Dowling. Alonzo G. Dowling Dec 26, 1888 June 16, 1922. F. Melissa Prigden July 1, 1866 Apr 18, 1943. Wife of R.Y. Dowling. Robert Y. Dowling...

Slave Narrative of Shack Thomas

Interviewer: Martin Richardson Person Interviewed: Shack Thomas Location: South Jacksonville, Florida Age: 102 Shack Thomas, Centenarian Beady-eyed, grey-whiskered, black little Shack Thomas sits in the sun in front of his hut on the Old Saint Augustine Road about three miles south of Jacksonville, 102 years old and full of humorous reminiscences about most of those years. To his frequent visitors he relates tales of his past, disjointedly sometimes but with a remarkable clearness and conviction. The old ex-slave does not remember the exact time of his birth, except that it was in the year 1834, “the day after the end of the Indian War.” He does not recall which of the Indian wars, but says that it was while there were still many Indians in West Florida who were very hard for him to understand when he got big enough to talk, to them. He was born, he says on “a great big place that b’longed to Mister Jim Campbell; I don’t know just exactly how big, but there was a lot of us working on it when I was a little fellow.” The place was evidently one of the plantations near Tallahassee; Thomas remembers that as soon as he was large enough he helped his parents and others raise “corn, peanuts, a little bit of cotton and potatoes. Squash just grew wild in the woods; we used to eat them when we couldn’t get anything else much.” The centenarian remembers his parents clearly; his mother was one Nancy and his father’s name was Adam. His father, he says, used to spend hours after the candles were out telling...

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