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Bartlett Family Genealogy

Typing on six onion skinned papers, Ralph Sylvester Bartlett presented his lineage in the early 1900’s. His Bartlett family were early pioneers in Kittery Maine in the section later known as Eliot Maine. Whether he ever meant to compile these pages into book form is left for you to interpret, but somebody did eventually compile the 6 pages they had of his family tree. We provide the entire 6 pages in digital format below the transcription.

Indian Captivity Narratives

This collection contains entire narratives of Indian captivity; that is to say, we have provided the reader the originals without the slightest abridgement. Some of these captivities provide little in way of customs and manners, except to display examples of the clandestine warfare Native Americans used to accomplish their means. In almost every case, there was a tug of war going on between principle government powers, French, American, British, and Spanish, and these powers used the natural prowess of the Indians to assist them in causing warfare upon American and Canadian settlers. There were definitely thousands of captivities, likely tens of thousands, as the active period of these Indian captivity narratives covers 150 years. Unfortunately, few have ever been put under a pen by the original captive, and as such, we have little first-hand details on their captivity. These you will find here, are only those with which were written by the captive or narrated to another who could write for them; you shall find in a later collection, a database of known captives, by name, location, and dates, and a narrative about their captivity along with factual sources. But that is for another time.

Slave Narrative of Mrs. Celestia Avery

Interviewer: Ross Person Interviewed: Celestia Avery Location: Georgia Place of Birth: Troupe County, LaGrange GA Age: 75 “A Few Facts Of Slavery” As Told By Celestia Avery—ex-Slave [MAY 8 1937] Mrs. Celestia Avery is a small mulatto woman about 5 ft. in height. She has a remarkably clear memory in view of the fact that she is about 75 years of age. Before the interview began she reminded the writer that the facts to be related were either told to her by her grandmother, Sylvia Heard, or were facts which she remembered herself. Mrs. Avery was born 75 years ago in Troupe County, LaGrange, Ga. the eighth oldest child of Lenora and Silas Heard. There were 10 other children beside herself. She and her family were owned by Mr. & Mrs. Peter Heard. In those days the slaves carried the surname of their master; this accounted for all slaves having the same name whether they were kin or not. The owner Mr. Heard had a plantation of about 500 acres and was considered wealthy by all who knew him. Mrs. Avery was unable to give the exact number of slaves on the plantation, but knew he owned a large number. Cotton, corn, peas, potatoes, (etc.) were the main crops raised. The homes provided for the slaves were two room log cabins which had one door and one window. These homes were not built in a group together but were more or less scattered over the plantation. Slave homes were very simple and only contained a home made table, chair and bed which were made of the same type of...

Slave Narrative of Mrs. Emmaline Heard

Person Interviewed: Emmaline Heard Location: 239 Cain Street On December 3 and 4, 1936, Mrs. Emmaline Heard was interviewed at her home, 239 Cain Street. The writer had visited Mrs. Heard previously, and it was at her own request that another visit was made. This visit was supposed to be one to obtain information and stories on the practice of conjure. On two previous occasions Mrs. Heard’s stories had proved very interesting, and I knew as I sat there waiting for her to begin that she had something very good to tell me. She began: “Chile, this story wuz told ter me by my father and I know he sho wouldn’t lie. Every word of it is the trufe; fact, everything I ebber told you wuz the trufe. Now, my pa had a brother, old Uncle Martin, and his wife wuz name Julianne. Aunt Julianne used ter have spells and fight and kick all the time. They had doctor after doctor but none did her any good. Somebody told Uncle Martin to go ter a old conjurer and let the doctors go cause they wan’t doing nothing fer her anyway. Sho nuff he got one ter come see her and give her some medicine. This old man said she had bugs in her head, and after giving her the medicine he started rubbing her head. While he rubbed her head he said: ‘Dar’s a bug in her head; it looks jest like a big black roach. Now, he’s coming out of her head through her ear; whatever you do, don’t let him get away cause I want him. Whatever...

Biography of William E. Heard

William E. Heard, clerk of the district court of the fourth judicial district of Idaho, and ex-officio auditor and recorder in and for Blaine County, Idaho, is a native of Missouri. He was born May 21, 1865, in a part of Benton county which has since been set off to form Hickory county, where John Heard, his grandfather, settled in 1832 and died in 1864. John Heard was a typical southern gentleman, born in the south in 1796. He lived in the south until about 1830, when he moved to Benton county, Missouri, becoming one of its first settlers. Earl Heard, son of John Heard and father of William E. Heard, was born in Hickory County, Missouri, May 8, 1837. He has been a successful farmer and is a decided Democrat and a member of the Missionary Baptist church. He married Mary Miller, also a native of Hickory county, Missouri, and a member of the same church, and they are both living, contented and respected, in their native county. Reared on his father’s farm, William E. Heard attended the public schools near his birthplace in Missouri and later was a student at the Missionary Baptist Institute at Macedonia, Missouri. For five years after his graduation he divided his time between working on the farm and teaching school. He came to Hailey, Idaho, in 1890, and for four years afterward taught near that place. In 1894 he was elected probate judge of Logan county, Idaho, but not long afterward Logan county was legislated out of existence as a civil division of the state, and Mr. Heard found himself in the...

Heard, William (Hearing) Mrs. – Obituary

Mrs. William Heard[Hearing] Dies in Baker on Saturday Funeral services were held Tuesday in Haines Methodist church for Mrs. William Hearing, 63, who died at her home in Baker Saturday night. The deecased[deceased] was born September 7, 1879, in McLeansboro, Illinois. She came with her parents, the late Mr. and Mrs. Edwin H. Pratt, to Union in 1891. Four years later they moved to a farm near Haines. She was married to William Hearing June 23[24], 1903. They moved to Baker in 1939. Surviving, besides her husband, are a daughter, Mrs. Fred Pembrook of North Powder; three brothers, George W. Pratt of Haines, James D. Pratt of Baker and Edgar M. Pratt of Weiser, Idaho; and two grandchildren. Interment was in the Haines cemetery. Rev. Harley Zeller officiated. The Record Courier, Baker City, OR, Thursday, 6 May 1943, Page 8. Contributed by: Robert C....

Heard, Erma June Taylor Mrs.

Erma June Heard, 95, a longtime resident of the Haines area, died at her home on Sept. 16, 2005. Her graveside service was at 2 p.m. today at the Haines Cemetery. Sally Wiens of the Haines United Methodist Church officiated. There was a luncheon and fellowship afterward at the Methodist Church Annex. Erma was born on Jan. 12, 1910, at Haines to George H. and Mary Elizabeth Ashwood Taylor. She lived most of her life on the same farm where she was raised. She graduated from Muddy Creek High School and attended her first year of teachers college at Monmouth. When the Eastern Oregon Normal School (now Eastern Oregon University) was built, she was a member of its first graduating class. She taught school at Manning Basin until she married. Married teachers were not allowed in that district. She married Theodore R. Heard on Oct. 11, 1930, at Vale. Erma and Ted bought her parents’ farm where they lived and raised their children. They had been married nearly 64 years when Ted died in 1994. Together they shared a rich life of hard work, love and companionship from the 1930s into the 1990s. For a number of years she was a member of the Mutual Improvement Club and the Eastern Oregon Museum, where she remained an honorary member. She helped at the Haines Library and was a member of the Retired Teachers Association. Erma also helped in the publishing of the Baker County History Book and was happy to be named Queen of the Fourth of July Celebration at Haines in 1995. She grew up attending the Haines Methodist...

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