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Prominent White Men among the Chickasaws

At an early day a few white men of culture and of good morals, fascinated with the wild and romantic freedom and simplicity of the Chickasaw life, cast their lot among that brave and patriotic nation of people. I read an article published in Mississippi a few years ago, which stated that a man by the name of McIntosh, commissioned by British authorities to visit the Chickasaw Nation and endeavor to keep up its ancient hostility to the French, was so delighted with the customs and manners of that brave, free and hospitable people that, after the accomplishment of his mission, he remained among them; then marrying a Chickasaw woman he became identified with the tribe; that he became an influential character among the Chickasaws; that he found the whole Nation living in one large village in the “Chickasaw Old Fields”; that he persuaded them to scatter, take possession of the most fertile and watered lands, and live where game was more plentiful; that he planted a colony at a place called Tokshish (corruption of Takshi-pro. Tark-shih, and sig. Bashful) several miles south of Pontotoc; that this colony became the favorite residence of the white renegades, etc. All of which is without even a shadow of truth. True, a man by the name of McIntosh once visited the Chickasaw Nation as stated; but after his diplomacy was accomplished, departed and returned no more. There never was a McIntosh identified in any way with the Chickasaws at that early day, nor has there been one from that day to this. The only white men adopted and identified with the Chickasaws at that early...

Treaty of 1832 against the Chickasaws

But, as that of the Choctaw country, so it may equally and truly be said that a more beautiful and richer country could not be portrayed on the canvass of nature than was also that of the Chickasaws now forming the north half of the State of Mississippi. They, as the Choctaws, annually burned the grass of their forests throughout their entire country; and thus the landscape was unobscured by any wood undergrowth whatever, while the tall forest trees, standing so thick as to shade the entire ground, spread their giant arms over the thick carpet of grass beneath, variegated with innumerable flowers of all colors arraying the earth in wild beauty, and filling the air with fragrance; while the incessant and merry warbling of their untaught orchestra (nature s dowry) from the unwearied throats of innumerable and gaily plumaged birds, fascinated the scene and made the heart glad; and in the autumn season, the Indian summer of those days of seventy-five years ago, when the sun rose a coppered disk casting no shadow until risen several degrees above the horizon; then, as it declined toward the west, passing through all shades from a bright gold to blood red and becoming invisible an hour or two before it sank below the western sky; nature was still not without its attractive beauties, though the foliage had changed to bronze by the kiss of winter frosts; on every side grapes, Muscatine’s, plums, persimmons of excellent flavor, and other autumnal fruits in rich profusion greeted the eye and gratified the taste of the most fastidious, while the reproachful chattering and nimble gambols...

Chickasaw Districts, Death, and Doctors

Up to the time the Chickasaws moved west (1836- 38), their country was divided into three districts, viz: Tishomingo, Sealy and McGilvery. At the time of their exodus west to their present places of abode, Tishomingo (properly Tishu Miko, chief officer or guard of the king) was the chief of the Tishu Miko district; Samuel Sealy, of the Sealy district, and William McGilvery, of the McGilvery district. The Chickasaw ruler was styled king instead of chief and his chief officer was called Tishu Miko. Ishtehotohpih was the reigning king at the time they left their ancient places of abode east of the Mississippi river for those west. He died in 1840. He was the last of the Chickasaw rulers who bore the title, king. After his death the monarchical form of government, which was hereditary, as I was informed by Governor Cyrus Harris, was abolished, and the form of Republicanism adopted. The power of their kings was very circumscribed, being only about equal to that of their present governor. The king’s wife was called queen, but clothed with no authority what ever, and regarded only as other Chickasaw women. That Tishu Miko was a wise counselor and brave warrior among the Chickasaws is about all that has escaped oblivion, as little has been preserved of his life by tradition or otherwise. He was the acting Tishu Miko of Ishtehotohpih at the time of the removal of his people to the west. He died in 1839, the year before his royal master. He was appointed during life as one of the chief counselors to Ishtehotohpih; and when he advised the...

Laws of the Chickasaw Tribe

The ancient Chickasaw divisions of the tribe were called Yakissah, (here stops). In reference to family connections in marrying they were the same as the Choctaws, No persons of the same Yakissah were allowed to marry. Also they have been called In Chukka Holhtenah Hochifo, most frequently abbreviated to Inchukka holhte chifo, his house (or clan) is numbered and named; and with the same reference as Yakissah, and also Iksa of the Choctaws. If a man violated the law by marrying a woman of his own Yakissah (or house), he forfeited his own rights and privileges, and also his children of the same; but the wife forfeited nothing. The Chickasaws, like their brethren, the Choctaws, never betrayed any trust reposed in them. No matter what whether of great value or of little consequence, was left in their charge to be taken care of, that confidence was never betrayed. They were true to their friendship, never being the first to violate its sacred ties; yet bitter their animosity, even as all the fallen race of unfortunate Adam. But like all their race of the long ago, they too possessed but little idea of compensation; therefore were easily made the victims of unprincipled white traders who well knew how to defraud them, and had no compunctions of conscience to use that knowledge to their own pecuniary advantage, though to the utter impoverishment of the Indian. But the Chickasaws, beginning to realize that they received very little in re turn for a very large amount given, adopted a very proper plan, as they thought, to test the honesty of all white traders,...

Narrative of Robert Eastburn – Indian Captivities

A Faithful Narrative of the Many Dangers and Sufferings, as well as wonderful and surprising deliverances, of Robert Eastburn, during his late captivity among the Indians. Written by Himself. Published at the earnest request of many persons, for the benefit of the Public. With a recommendatory Preface by the Rev. Gilbert Tennent. Psalms 24, 6, 7, and 193, 2, 4. Philadelphia: Printed. Boston: Reprinted and sold by Green & Russell, opposite the Probate Office in Queen street, 1753. Preface Candid Reader: The author (and subject) of the ensuing narrative (who is a deacon of our church, and has been so for many years) is of such an established good character, that he needs no recommendation of others where he is known; a proof of which was the general joy of the inhabitants of this city, occasioned by his return from a miserable captivity; together with the readiness of divers persons to contribute to the relief of himself and necessitous family, without any request of his, or the least motion of that tendency. But seeing the following sheets are like to spread into many places where he is not known, permit me to say that, upon long acquaintance, I have found him to be a person of candor, integrity, and sincere piety, whose testimony may with safety be depended upon; which give his narrative the greater weight, and may induce to read it with the greater pleasure. The design of it is evidently pious; the matters contained in it and manner of handling them, will, I hope, be esteemed by the impartial to be entertaining and improving. I wish it...

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George A. Godsmark, George Wigent, Daniel Place, John J. DeWitt, Jay Henderson, William H. Barr, Josephus Sanborn, John C. Thomas, Michael Hamill, William Mitchell, Henry Thrall, William Motter, George Upright, Thomas J. Hitchcock, Asa Goodrich, Charles Albright, George Hoag, David Wise,...

Washington County, Idaho Pioneer Honor Roll

In 1940 and 1943, a survey of everyone who had lived in Washington County continuously for 50 years or more, was made by the Weiser American. These pioneer residents were especially honored at the Fall Festival held in the fall of both years. So far as is known, the list compiled by the survey is complete and perhaps the only record of its kind in existence. The community loyalty and neighborly spirit that typifies this locality is our legacy from these early pioneers. Their sweat and toil made possible many luxuries that we of Washington County now enjoy. Their ambition and foresight resulted in far flung civic improvements that are of lasting benefit. SurnameGiven NameMiddle Name/TitleAddressCame FromDate Arrived AdamEffieMrs.WeiserIowaJuly, 1879 AdamsFrancisCambridgeCornwall, Eng.1874 AdamsRichardJWeiserCornwall, Eng.1874 AdamsVereWeiserNative1890 AdamsonRosaMidvaleKansas1884 AderBerthaMrs.MidvaleAugust, 1881 AderArthurWeiserMissouri1884 AllenClaudeMrs.Weiser1889 AllisonAlexBCambridgeNative1875 AndersonErnmaO. / Mrs.WeiserSweden1887 ApplegateWilliamWeiserOregon1878 BartonBarbaraS. / Mrs.WeiserMissouri1882 BartonCarrieMrs.Weiser1882 BartonMollieWeiserNative1885 BeierAmeliaMrs.WeiserUtah1882 BlackDoraMrs.WeiserMontana1888 BoydLillianHague / Mrs.MidvaleNative1881 BradshawWalterWeiserIllinois1884 BranchBS. / Mrs.MidvaleNative BrooksArthurSWeiserNative1873 BuhlThomasCambridge1869 CalwhiteMaeSalingWeiserNative1883 CalwhiteMartinWeiserGermanySept. 1887 CanaryLizzieMrs.WeiserMontana1881 CarpbbellLenaWeiserNative1882 CarrickBertCambridgeKansas1882 ConnellMaryMrs.WeiserIndiana1880 CopeBenWeiserNative1882 CorbettJRWeiserNative1883 CornettOllieJones / Mrs.MidvaleNative1879 CornettIsaacWMidvaleOregon1882 CousensWJWeiserSept. 1882 CowinsLewisWeiserCalifornia1887 CoxAliceMrs.Cambridge1881 CrowellLoraCravenWeiserNative1880 DalyCarrieM. / MrsWeiserOregonApril 1884 DaytonMaryWeiserJerusalem, Idaho1878 DevennyGeoMrs.WeiserNative1884 DickersonL.M. / MrsWeiserBoise1869 DickersonLMWeiserKansas1877 DodgeMaybelleBrooksWeiserNative1868 DonartGeorgeWeiserNative1890 EcclesWilliamHCambridge1886 EdlinLauraWilsonWeiserIllinois1886 ElliottAndrewWeiserOregon1887 EshomEmmaF. / Mrs.WeiserKansas1875 EvansDudleyMidvaleAugust, 1881 EvansJohnMidvaleNative1882 FavreLouisMidvaleOregon1889 GallowayFrancisHWeiserNative1871 GallowayAFWeiserNative1877 GallowayGuyWeiserNative1880 GallowayKatherineWeiserNative1882 GilderoyGeorgeWeiserIllinoisJuly, 1871 GilderoyNA. / AllieWeiserNative1875 GilderoyMaryMrs.WeiserOregon1878 GlascockGeorgeWeiserNative1882 GrayClaraE. / Mrs.WeiserOregonSpring, 1872 GrayThomasWWeiserNativeJuly, 1882 GrimmettWilliamWeiserOregon1883 HagueGeorgeWeiserNative1888 HarrisFrankJudgeWeiserCalifornia1880 HarrisNettieO. / Mrs.WeiserOklahoma1881 HauntzHJWeiserMissouriJuly, 1882 HemenwayJB. / Sr.WeiserUtah1880 HemenwayJB. / Sr.WeiserNative1881 HixonCL. / Dr.WeiserKansas1882 HoffstatterMaryCambridgeNebraska1879 HopkinsLeeAWeiserOhio1889 HopkinsVernonJWeiser1889 HopperRA. / Mrs.WeiserMissouri1876 HopperJohnMMidvaleAugust, 1883 HubbardJW. / Mrs.WeiserSept. 1882 HubbardCoraAWeiserIllinois1882 HubbardJWWeiserOregon1886 JacksonAlexWeiserMissouri1890 JonesMaryMrs.Native1872 JonesIda.WeiserKansas1875 JonesAJWeiserMissouri1878 KeithleySAMidvale1876 KeithleySA. / Mrs.MidvaleMissouri1881 KeithleySarahMrs.MidvaleMissouri1881 KeithleySeppie.MidvaleMissouri1881 KeithlyEffieMrs.Midvale1881 KimballSallieR. / Mrs.WeiserNative1877 KiserCharlesAWeiserColorado1881 KorupFranz.WeiserGermany1888 LaffertyZellaMrs.WeiserNative1884 LanningRebecca.WeiserKansas1891 LedingtonCalvin.MidvaleKansas1883 LedingtonCal.MidvaleKansas1883 LinderMinnieMrsMidvaleUtah1870 LinderThosMMidvaleColoradoSept. 1875 LinderRoseMidvale1877 LinderRoseGrosecloseMidvale1877 MadisonDave.Weiser1880 MartinDoraKelly / Mrs.WeiserNative1876...

Biography of Cyrus Harris

Biographical Sketch Of Cyrus Harris, Ex-Governor Of The Chickasaw Nation. Cyrus Harris, who was of the House Emisha taluyah (pro. E, we, mish-ar, beyond, ta-larn-yah, putting it down) was born, as he stated to me, three, miles south of Pontotoc, Mississippi, on the 22nd of August 1817. He died at his home on Mill Creek, Chickasaw Nation. He lived with his mother until the year 1827, when he was sent to school at the Monroe Missionary Station, at the time that Rev. Thomas C. Stuart, that noble Christian missionary and Presbyterian minister, had charge of the school, and in which many Chickasaw youths, both male and female, were being- educated. In 1828, he was taken, to the state of Tennessee by Mr. Hugh Wilson, a minister also of the Old School Presbyterian faith and order, and placed in an Indian school located on a small stream called Roberson Fork, in the county of Giles. This humble little Indian school was taught by a man named William R. McNight. Cyrus, at the close of the year 1829, had only been taught the rudiments of an English education, to spell in the spelling-book and read in the New Testament. In the early part of the year 1830, he took up the study of geography and reading in the first and second readers, which terminated his school boy days, as he returned home that year and never attended school again. When he returned to his home he found it vacated; but learned that his mother had moved to a place near a little lake then known as Ishtpufahaiyip (pro. Isht-poon-fah, Horn, haiyip,...

Biographical Sketch of Frank M. Harris

Frank M. Harris was born in Marshall county, West Virginia, January 7, 1843, and is a son, of John and Drusilla Harris, both natives of Virginia. Our subject received a common school education in his native State, and learned the carpenter’s trade with his father, but has given his attention, almost entirely to farming. He came to this county in 1877. Mr. Harris was united in marriage, November 30, 1865, to Miss Eliza A. Wilson, who was born May 29, 1844. By this union they have had four children: John A., born October 30, 1866-is dead; Hanson, born May 5, 1869; Lionel, born February 7, 1871; Lydia A., born July 23, 1873- is...
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