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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Disbursements to Cherokees under the Treaty of May 6, 1828

Abstract of disbursements and expenditures made by George Vashon, Indian Agent for the Cherokees west of the Mississippi, under the stipulations of the Treaty with said tribe of 6th May, 1828, between the 16th September, 1830, and the 31st December, 1833. In total this list represents 390 Cherokee families and 1835 individuals who each received 25.75 as part of their payment under the 5th article of the treaty of 6th May, 1828.

1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Mary F., emp. H. S. & H., h. 16 East Main View the Complete Directory Surnames in the Town of Lakeville Massachusetts You will find the directory of Lakeville Massachusetts starts on page 161. Aldrich, Allen, Anderson, Ashley, Audet, Barnes, Barney, Barton, Bassett, Bennett, Benton, Best, Boman, Briggs, Brown, Bullock, Bump, Bumpus, Burgess, Canedy, Card, Carlin, Caswell, Chace, Clark, Clarke, Cole, Collins, Coombs, Cudworth, Cushman, Davis, Dean, DeMoranville, Dexter, Drake, Dushane, Ellers, Elmer, Elwell, Farmer, Farnham, Ford, Frades, Freeman, Frost, Gerrish, Gifford, Gilman, Gilpatrick, Godfrey, Grady, Griffith, Hackett, Hafford, Hale, Hall, Hammond, Harlow, Harrington, Harvey, Haskell, Haskins, Hayes, Haynes, Hinds, Hinkley, Hoard, Hoffman, Holloway, Horr, Horton, Morton, Howland, Johnson, Jones, Keith, Kelley, Kenney, Kinsley, Lang, Leach, Leonard, Letcher, Lincoln, Loner, Luther, Macomber, Mann, Manning, Marrah, McCulby, McDonald, McGowan, Moody, Morgan, Mosher, Murphy, Nelson, Nickerson, Norris, Orrall, Osborne, Parker, Parkhurst, Parris, Parry, Paun, Peirce, Perry, Phinney, Pickens, Pierce, Pittsley, Plummer, porter, Pratt, Quell, Ramsdell, Reed, Reynolds, Robbins, Robinson, Rogers, Russell, Sampson, Sanford, Sawyer, Scott, Seekell, Sharidan, Shaw, Shockley, Shove,...

Sons of Quebec 1778-1843

The Sons of Quebec (Fils de Qu├ębec) were written by Pierre-Georges Roy and published in 1933 in a four volume set. They provide a series of short biographies of one to three pages of Quebec men from 1778-1843. Warning… this manuscript is in French!

Biography of Capt. John Harper

Capt. John Harper was a native of Philadelphia; and followed the sea for many years after he was grown. In 1750 he settled in Alexandria, Va., where he died in his 87th year. He was married twice, and had twenty-nine children, eighteen sons and eleven daughters. Charles, the youngest son by his first wife, married Lucy Smither, who was of Scotch descent, and by her he had two children. He was married the second time to a Miss January, by whom he had nine children. The second son of his last wife, whose name was Charles B., was born in Culpepper Co., Va, in May, 1802. He was married in 1823 to Anna. C. Price, of Pittsylvania Co., Va., and settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., in 1830. He was engaged in merchandising at Danville for five years, and one year on his farm. He brought the first demijohns to Montgomery County, and sold a great many as curiosities, most of the inhabitants having never seen anything of the kind. Soon after his arrival in Montgomery he went over to Callaway County, one day, to get a load of corn, and wore his usual every-day clothes, made of home-spun cloth. On his way back the road led him by a house where Jabe Ham was preaching, and he stopped to hear the sermon. During the services the minister called on the congregation to kneel in prayer, and all knelt except Mr. Harper, who leaned his head upon his hand, and remained in that position. Ham noticed him, and prayed that the Lord would bless “that Virginia man, who had on...

Slave Narrative of Berry Smith

Interviewer: W. B. Allen Person Interviewed: Berry Smith Location: Forest, Mississippi Place of Birth: Sumpter County, Alabama “Uncle Berry” Smith is five feet two or three inches tall. He is scrupulously neat. He is very independent for his age, which is calculated at one hundred and sixteen years. He believes the figure to be correct. His mind is amazingly clear. “I was born an’ bred in Sumpter County, Alabama, in de prairie lan’, six miles from Gainesville. Dat’s where I hauled cotton. It was close to Livingston, Alabama, where we lived. “I was twelve years old when de stars fell. Dey fell late in de night an’ dey lighted up de whole earth. All de chaps was a-runnin’ ‘roun’ grabbin’ for ’em, but none of us ever kotched[FN: caught] one. It’s a wonder some of’ em didn’ hit us, but dey didn’. Dey never hit de groun’ atall. “When dey runned de Injuns out de country, me an’ another chap kotched one o’ dem Injun’s ponies an hung him up[FN: tied him up] in de grape vines. He said it was his pony an’ I said it was mine. “Marse Bob’s boy tol’ us his daddy was gwine a-whup us for stealin’ dat pony, so we hid out in de cane for two nights. Marse Bob an’ his brother whupped us’ til we didn’ want to see no more Injuns or dey ponies, neither. “I was born a slave to Old Marse Jim Harper an’ I fell to Marse Bob. Marse Jim bought my pa an’ ma from a man by de name o’ Smith, an’ Pa kep’ de...

Biographical Sketch of William Harper

William Harper, one of the oldest men in Lake County, is the son of John and Elizabeth (Weaver) Harper; they were both probably born in Pennsylvania; they married, and made their home in Kentucky. They had three sons, but one of them living; they both belonged to the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Harper was a farmer, and in politics a Whig. Mrs. Harper lived to be sixty five years old, and he was eighty seven; his ancestors were Dutch. William Harper was born June 10, 1807, in Woodford County, Kentucky At the age of sixteen, he accepted a position as salesman in his brother’s store, but a few years later returned to farming. In 1846 he married Frances N. McGehee, born December 19, 1832; they had no children, and the following year she died. In 1848 he married Sarah H. Tittesworth; she was born November 21, 1832, and died in 1880. They had seven children, five living. Mrs. Harper was a Methodist. Mr. Harper was a Whig before the war, and a democrat since. In 1855 he moved to Madrid Bend. He owns 400 acres of fine land. In 1875 he moved to California on account of his wife’s health, but, as it failed to benefit her, they returned to Madrid Bend. He has been a resident of the county for thirty years, and is now in his eightieth year. His life has been a long and useful one, and he retains the confidence of...

Biography of Capt. James Berrien Harper

CAPT. JAMES BERRIEN HARPER. He whose name heads this sketch is one of the substantial citizens and successful agriculturists of Barren Creek Township, Baxter County, Arkansas, but was born in Franklin County, Ga., November 17, 1833, a son of Andrew Knox and Anna (Little) Harper, natives of Virginia and Georgia, respectively. When a young man the father went to Georgia and was married in Franklin County, and in 1839 moved to Pontotoc County, Miss., where he made his home until his death in 1851, at the age of fifty-six years, his wife having died in Pontotoc County when forty-one years old. The father was a successful business man, was original and independent in his views, and was an active and earnest member of the Methodist Church. Six children were born to himself and wife, only two of whom are now living: James Berrien and Hattie T. (Bacon). the latter residing on Florida coast. The Harpers are of Irish origin. Capt. James Berrien Harper was educated in the common schools of Pontotoc County, and since his sixteenth year he has had the cares of a family on his shoulders, for after the death of his father, he took his place as well as he could and cared for the younger members of the family. In January, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, of the Third Mississippi Infantry, but after the capture of Ft. Donelson he became a part of the Forty-third Mississippi Infantry, and was elected first lieutenant of Company E, just before Gen. Grant closed the lines around Vicksburg. He was also at Corinth. Abbeville and Grenada, was in...

Biography of James W. Harper

James W. Harper, who is now living retired in a beautiful semi-country home at the village of Ogden, has been a factor in this section of Champaign County for many years. His associates speak of Mr. Harper as a man, meaning thereby not only his physical strength, but strength of determination, of purposeful conduct, and of notable public spirit displayed in his efforts to advance wherever possible the welfare of the community. Mr. Harper was born at Dana in Vermilion County, Indiana, August 23, 1865, a son of John and Amanda (Dikes) Harper. Both parents were born at Rockville in the same Indiana county. The Dikes family came originally from Kentucky. John Harper and wife had five children, one son and four daughters. About fifty-two years ago the family moved to Vermilion County, Illinois, locating at Pilot Grove, and still later in Champaign County, settling in Ogden Township. John Harper was one of the most successful men of Champaign County and much of his ability was inherited by his only son, James. He was quick, intelligent and industrious, and had the faculty of using his means for redoubled profit and advantage. At the time of his death he owned an estate of 800 acres. The Harper children all attended the district school known as the Hope School. James W. Harper was educated there, and as he grew up he learned farming from his father and emulated his skill and competence as a business manager. On October 1, 1890, Mr. Harper married Miss Mary E. Canady. She was born in Ogden Township, daughter of Asbury and Drusilla (Divan) Canady. The...

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