Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In the table below you can find the name of those whom biographies can be found and click on the page number – it will take you directly to their biography. If you wish to access the history portion of the manuscript then it is contained in volumes 1-2, volume 3 being devoted entirely to biographies. Gallery of Western Nebraska’s People 143 full page photographs of families, couples, group photographs, individual people, and homesteads found within the manuscript History of Western Nebraska & It’s People, Volume 3. Volume 1 – History of Western Nebraska Volume 2 – History of Western Nebraska Biographies of Western Nebraska – Volume 3 SurnameGivePageNotes BusheeBerton Kenyon5 GentryBenjamin F.6 DownerAmon R.7 KirkhamValle B.7 LammWilliam H.8 NeeleyRobert G.8 HamptonRodolphus M.9 HardingWilliam Henry11 WesterveltJames P.11 GrimmJoseph L.12 McHenryMatthew H.12 RaymondLewis L.13 LymanWilliam H.14 SimmonsRobert G.14 DenslowLloyd15 PeckhamJohn S.16 PeckhamGeorge B.16 AndersonVictor17M.D. FrenchWilliam F.17 DavisEvan G.18 HanksRobert M.18 LammWilliam19Sr. ProhsOtto J.19 JonesHoward O.20D.D.S. MillerRobert G.20 AtkinsAuburn W.21 BrownWilliam G.22D.D.S. IrelandTed L.22 HamiltonLuther F.23 YoungFrank B.23M. D. ScottFremont24 MaginnisPatrick25 FaughtArthur M.27M....

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Lord Family of Norwich Vermont

Jonathan Lord, Jr., and David Lord, the first of the name to locate in Norwich, came from Colchester, Connecticut, (in what year is not definitely known, probably about 1773). They were two of several children born to Jonathan and Ruth Lord of that place. Jonathan, Jr., was born February 17, 1752; was a voter in Norwich in 1784. He married, in October, 1782, Mary Smith, and their children were: Porter Lord. Russell Lord. John Lord. Polly Lord. Lydia Lord. John Proctor Lord Rachel Lord. Mr. Lord died at Norwich February 27, 1821. David Lord was born at Colchester August 4, 1756, and died at Norwich January 25, 1803. He married Hannah Hanks, by whom he had eight children: Asa Lord, born in Norwich, October 14, 1783, married (first) Ruth Howe, and their children were: Ira Lord, who died in Thetford, Vermont. Lyman Lord (deceased). Abigail Lord (deceased), married William Cummings. Laura Lord (deceased), married Tarbell Senter. Gideon Lord, born in Norwich, Sept. 8, 1814, and died here Apr. 9, 1898, married Belisant Clough. Amasa C. Lord, removed to Illinois, after graduating from Dartmouth College in 1843, and died at Somonauk, that state. Laura Lord ( deceased), married Jonathan S. Lord. Mills A. Lord, married Livia Seaver of Norwich, daughter of Captain Calvin Seaver. Asa Lord married (second) Amelia Root of Norwich and their children were: Frances Amelia Lord Abel Lord Emma A. Lord M. Ellen Lord William Lord Henry Lord Persis Lord John Lord (son of Jonathan, Jr.) was born in Norwich, August 1, 1782, and died in town June 19, 1882. He married Lucy Bliss, to whom were born: David Bliss Lord (died...

Hardships of the Early Natchez Emigrants

Taking the reader with us, to the settlements of the distant Natchez region, he will find that emigrants continued to pour in, upon those fertile hills and alluvial bottoms, from all parts of “his majesty’s Atlantic plantations.” Many were the hardships and perils they encountered, in reaching this remote and comparatively uninhabited region. It is believed that the history of one party of these emigrants will enable the reader to understand what kind of hardships and deprivations all the others were forced to undergo. Major General Phineas Lyman, a native of Durham, a graduate of Yale, a distinguished lawyer, and a member of the legislature of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, became commander of the Connecticut forces in 1755. He served with so much distinction, during the Canadian war, that he was invited, by persons high in office, to visit England. He had formed an association composed of his brothers in arms, called the “Military Adventurers,” whose design was, the colonization of a tract of country upon the Mississippi. He sailed to England, as agent for this company, with the sanguine, yet reasonable hope, that the King would make the grant. Arriving there he found, to his astonishment, that land in a wilderness was refused to those who had fought so valiantly for it, and whose contemplated establishment would have formed a barrier against enemies, who might seek to acquire it. In his own country Lyman had never solicited favor, otherwise than by faithful public services. The coolness which he now experienced deeply mortified him — his spirits sank, and he lost all his former energy. Shocked at the degradation...

Early Residents of Great Falls, Montana

Paris Gibson came to Montana in 1879 to engage in sheep raising, and his consequent observations of the country led to his fortunate investment in land at the falls of the Missouri. I have no data concerning his previous life. Hon. H. P. Rolfe was born in Vermont in 1849, and educated there, choosing law for a profession. He came to Montana in 1876, and was for two years supt of public schools in Helena. During 1879 he was managing editor of the Butte Miner. He next removed to Fort Benton, where he practised law, but in 1884 located permanently in Great Falls. He was elected probate judge in 1880, serving one term, but prefers to keep out of politics. George W. Taylor was born on a farm near Lexington, Kentucky, in 1853, raised and educated in his native state, where he also taught school for several years. He came to Montana in 1883 and studied law with Hen. J. K. Toole, being admitted to the bar in 1884. Immediately he located at Great Falls, the first lawyer there. He was appointed county attorney on the organization of Cascade Company, and in 1888 elected to the same position. He was a candidate for reelection on the state ticket of 1889. E. G. Maclay was born in Pennsylvania in 1844, and removed with his parents to St Louis when a child. He came to Montana in 1863, and for twenty years was engaged in freighting, after which he entered mercantile life. He was the first merchant in Great Falls. Ira Myers, born in Ohio in 1839, went to Colorado in...

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Mary E. Hanks

(See Downing, Oolootsa)-Robert Taylor, son of Robert Taylor and Margaret Ann Ward (Morgan) Hanks, was born January 9, 1840. He married December 22, 1890 Mary Elizabeth, daughter of Robert and Jennie (Wright) Wafford, born September 7, 1864, and they were the parents of Roberta Inez Hanks. Mr. Hanks was appointed Circuit Judge for the Southern Circuit of the Cherokee Nation, May 3, 1878, and was elected to this position on August 5, succeeding. He was elected a member of Council from Canadian District in 1879 and 1881; and was elected Clerk of the Council in...

Pin It on Pinterest