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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Bean and Bane Family Genealogy of Saco Valley Maine

Tradition makes the ancestor of this family who first came to our shores a native of the Isle of Jersey, but I doubt the truth of the statement. I have not found the name, or one resembling it, in any record or book relating to Jersey. The surname Bain, and Bane, are derived from the Gaelic word bane which signified white or fair complexion, as Donald Bane, who usurped the Scottish throne after the death of his brother, Malcolm Canmore. An ancient branch of the family in Fifeshire, Scotland, have spelled the surname Bayne. The Highland MacBanes were a branch of the Macintosh clan, and their distinctive badge was the red whortleberry. Maj. Gillies MacBane, chief of the clan in 1745, was a man of giant stature, being six feet four and a half inches in height. He brought a hundred MacBanes into the field, and at the battle of Culloden, being beset by a squad of government troops, he placed his back against a wall, and, though wounded in several places, fought with such desperation that he laid thirteen of his assailants dead at his feet. An officer called to “save that brave man,” but they cut him down. His widow is said to have composed the pathetic lament in Gaelic, entitled mo run geal oig, or. The following lines were found in a work called “The Gael”: “With thy back to the wall, and thy breast to the targe, Full Hashed thy claymore in the face of their charge, The blood of the boldest that barren turf stain. But alas! thine is reddest there, Gillies MacBane! Hewn...

Atkinson Family Genealogy of Saco Valley

The Atkinsons were English, and the ancestors of the New England families came from Bury, in County Lancaster, in 1634. Theodore Atkinson, the emigrant, settled in Boston and was owner of a good estate there. Atkinson street, where he had land, was named for him, and Berry street, for the place of his nativity. Hon. Theodore Atkinson, a grandson, settled on Great island, in Portsmouth harbor, and engaged in trade and fishing. He was appointed clerk of the Superior Court of Judicature for the province; was a man of great fidelity, held in high esteem. John Atkinson, son of the first Theodore, b. in Boston in 1636, m. Sarah Myrick, Apr. 27, 1664, and lived on the side of the “Upper Green,” in Newburyport, Mass. His son, John Atkinson, m. Sarah Woodman, in 1693, and had Thomas, b. Mar. 16, 1694, who m. Mary Pike, of Salisbury, Aug. 5, 17 19. He was the father of: Humphrey Atkinson, b. June 12, 1720; m. Sarah Hale, of Newburyport, May 25, 1743, and lived in that town until 1760, when he came to Buxton. He had purchased land in the township previously; was a shipwright. He d. in 1775, and with his wife was buried at Pleasant Point. Children named as follows, being born in Newbury: Sarah Atkinson, b. June 25, 1744; m. Jabez Bradbury. Joseph Atkinson, b. Aug. 24, 1745; m. Olive, dau. of Capt. Joseph Woodman, Dec. 18, 1767, and in 1769 his father conveyed to him forty acres of land, upon which he settled and died. He was deacon of the Baptist church. He and his brother m....

1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Mary F., emp. H. S. & H., h. 16 East Main View the Complete Directory Surnames in the Town of Lakeville Massachusetts You will find the directory of Lakeville Massachusetts starts on page 161. Aldrich, Allen, Anderson, Ashley, Audet, Barnes, Barney, Barton, Bassett, Bennett, Benton, Best, Boman, Briggs, Brown, Bullock, Bump, Bumpus, Burgess, Canedy, Card, Carlin, Caswell, Chace, Clark, Clarke, Cole, Collins, Coombs, Cudworth, Cushman, Davis, Dean, DeMoranville, Dexter, Drake, Dushane, Ellers, Elmer, Elwell, Farmer, Farnham, Ford, Frades, Freeman, Frost, Gerrish, Gifford, Gilman, Gilpatrick, Godfrey, Grady, Griffith, Hackett, Hafford, Hale, Hall, Hammond, Harlow, Harrington, Harvey, Haskell, Haskins, Hayes, Haynes, Hinds, Hinkley, Hoard, Hoffman, Holloway, Horr, Horton, Morton, Howland, Johnson, Jones, Keith, Kelley, Kenney, Kinsley, Lang, Leach, Leonard, Letcher, Lincoln, Loner, Luther, Macomber, Mann, Manning, Marrah, McCulby, McDonald, McGowan, Moody, Morgan, Mosher, Murphy, Nelson, Nickerson, Norris, Orrall, Osborne, Parker, Parkhurst, Parris, Parry, Paun, Peirce, Perry, Phinney, Pickens, Pierce, Pittsley, Plummer, porter, Pratt, Quell, Ramsdell, Reed, Reynolds, Robbins, Robinson, Rogers, Russell, Sampson, Sanford, Sawyer, Scott, Seekell, Sharidan, Shaw, Shockley, Shove,...

Bethany Baptist Church Cemetery Graham Indiana

This is an historical transcription of Bethany Baptist Church Cemetery, Graham, Jefferson County, Indiana which was transcribed in 1941 as part of the DAR cemetery transcription project. The value of this transcription is that in many cases they transcribed headstones which may today no longer exist. Had it not been for this project these records may have been lost due to the natural regression of cemeteries. Many of the cemeteries may be known by a different name today, we use the name they were identified as in 1941. Arbuckle, J. N., 07 Aug 1837 – 10 Dec 1882 Boyd, Robert H., 09 May 1830 – 22 June 1917, Co. B. 10th Iowa Regiment Cain, John, 23 Aug 1868 – 15 Apr 1892 Cain, Melissa J., w/o John Cain, 12 Mar 1813 – 07 Aug 1867 Cain, Martha, w/o John Cain, 20 Jun 1838 – 17 Jan 1893 Cain, Emma, 1867 – 1927 Cain, Marcellus, 22 Sep 1842 – 25 Mar 1878 Chambers, Rose N., d/o of Chas & Nancy Chambers, 25 Sep 1864 – 08 Jun 1886 Chambers, Nancy, 25 Jun 1819 – 24 Jan 1891 Chambers, James B., 07 May 1822 – 24 Dec 1893 Chambers, Melita, w/o Alex Chambers, d. 04 Feb 1878, age 47 years Chambers, Avery, consort of Rhoda Chambers, d. 08 Mar 1865, age 67 years Chambers, Rhoda, w/o Avery Chambers, d. 21 Aug 1875, age 75 years Chasteen, inf. Son of Chasteen, 1863 Chasteen, James, 07 Aug 1818 – 07 Jun 1889 Chasteen, Elizabeth, 1820 – 1902 Chasteen, Ephraim, 25 Nov 1847 – 01 Sep 1927 Chasteen, Christenia, w/o E. Chasteen, 28 Mar...

General History of the Western Indian Tribes 1851-1870 – Indian Wars

Up to 1851, the immense uninhabited plains east of the Rocky Mountains were admitted to be Indian Territory, and numerous tribes roamed from Texas and Mexico to the Northern boundary of the United States. Then came the discovery of gold in California, drawing a tide of emigration across this wide reservation, and it became necessary, by treaty with the Indians, to secure a broad highway to the Pacific shore. By these treaties the Indians were restricted to certain limits, but with the privilege of ranging, for hunting purposes, over the belt thus re-reserved as a route of travel. The United States, also, agreed to pay the Indians 850,000 per annum, for fifteen years, in consideration of this right. The boundaries assigned, by these treaties to the Cheyennes and Arrapahoes, included the greater part of the present Colorado Territory, while the Sioux and Crows were to occupy the land of the Powder River route. After a few years gold was discovered in Colorado, upon the Indian reservation, settlers poured in, and, after the lands were mostly taken up by them, another treaty was made, February 18th, 1861, to secure them in peaceful possession. By this compact the Indians relinquished a large tract of land, and agreed to confine themselves to a small district upon both sides of the Arkansas River and along the northern boundary of New Mexico; while the United States was to furnish them protection; pay an annuity of $30,000 to each tribe for fifteen years, and provide stock and agricultural implements for those who desired to adopt civilized modes of life. Until April, 1864, no disturbances had...

Biographical Sketch of W. H. Hancock

W. H. Hancock, who is one of the most successful broom-corn brokers and business men of Tuscola, was born in Chicago, March 29, 1864, and is a son of W. S. and Sarah (Bell) Hancock. His father was born in Oxford, Ohio, and his mother in Mifflintown, Pennsylvania. His father is now living a retired life in Chicago. W. H. Hancock was raised to manhood in Chicago and educated in the Cook County normal school. His first position of any importance was that of conductor on the Pullman car lines, and he continued as such for seven years, running over thirty-six different railroads. For seven years he was engaged in the broom-corn business with his father in Chicago. In January, 1895, he was married to Miss Tillie Brogan, a highly accomplished young lady of Muscatine, Iowa. They have two children, John Henry and May. In 1899 he associated himself in partnership with W. Avery Howard (a notice of whom is found elsewhere) in the broom-corn brokerage business with their office in Tuscola. The firm is one of the most active and responsible engaged in the business. During the last year they handled about fifteen hundred tons of broom corn. He and his wife stand high in the social circles of Tuscola, where they expect to make their future...

Biographical Sketch of J. J. Hancock

J.J. Hancock, tobacco dealer, was born in England in 1830; came to America in 1851, and located at London, Canada; removed to Buffalo, N.Y., in 1853, and engaged in the boot and shoe business. He removed to Dubuque, Ia., in 1858; thence to Sioux Falls, South Dakota in 1871, where he resumed the boot and shoe business. In 1878 he was in the employ of the American Express Company. In 1879 he located in Missouri...
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