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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Sons of Quebec 1778-1843

The Sons of Quebec (Fils de Québec) were written by Pierre-Georges Roy and published in 1933 in a four volume set. They provide a series of short biographies of one to three pages of Quebec men from 1778-1843. Warning… this manuscript is in French!

The Bush Family of Norwich Vermont

Captain Timothy Bush, the progenitor of this family in town, came to Norwich in the early days of its settlement (from what place is not known). He married Deborah House, and they had ten children (five of whom were born in Norwich), viz., John Bush, married Abigail Marvin and had at least one son: George Bush. Barzilla Bush. Timothy Bush. Fairbanks Bush. Alexander Bush. Bela Bush. Harry Bush. Nathaniel Bush. Mary Bush, who married Nathaniel Seaver. Lavina Bush, who married Doctor Hamilton of Lyme, New Hampshire. Captain Bush appears as a voter in town in 1772, and March 9, 1799, he was chosen one of the board of five selectmen. He was prominent in town affairs till about the time he removed to the State of New York (about 1809), where, it is reported, he died in 1815. It is current with some persons that he ended his days here in Norwich and that he was buried in the old graveyard near the mouth of Pompanoosuc River, but no gravestone can be found to indicate his burial there. When Captain Bush located in Norwich it was in the Pompanoosuc section of the town, where he became an extensive landowner. He was one of the original proprietors of the town of Orange, Vermont, chartered by the state in August, 1781. His son, John, with Paul Brigham, Nathaniel Seaver, John Hibbard, Elihu White, and John White, were other Norwich men who were proprietors of that town, and his sons, Fairbanks and Timothy, Jr., were among the early settlers of the place, the former being elected selectman and also lister on the first organization of the town, March 9,...

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George A. Godsmark, George Wigent, Daniel Place, John J. DeWitt, Jay Henderson, William H. Barr, Josephus Sanborn, John C. Thomas, Michael Hamill, William Mitchell, Henry Thrall, William Motter, George Upright, Thomas J. Hitchcock, Asa Goodrich, Charles Albright, George Hoag, David Wise,...

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Henry J. Hamilton

Neppie, daughter of Pleasant Napoleon Blackstone and Mary Barr was born at Muskogee July 9, 1381, educated in Bacone College, Muskogee. She married March 8, 1906, Henry J. Hamilton. They are the parents of Ollie, born October 24, 1906; Maude, born January 17, 1908; Lillian, born May 20, 1909; Henry J. born June 27, 1911; Nellie, born November 13, 1912; George, born August 4, 1914; Jacob Clark, born January 12, 1916 and Neppie Leona Hamilton, born August 15, 1918. Mrs. Hamilton’s Cherokee name is...

Slave Narrative of Alfred Smith

Person Interviewed: Alfred Smith Place of Birth: Calhoon, Georgia Occupation: Farmer I was born in Calhoon, Georgia. I don’t know the date of birth, but as near as I can get at, my age is 80 years old. My mother’s name is Mary Johnson and my father’s name is Alexandra Hamilton. He was named for his first master, but was later sold to Master Smith. I haven’t seen neither of them. I don’t even know how or who raised me up into the teens in age. I just remember my working here and there for what I could get. I learned to count myself, one day. I gathered some straws and went into the woods and broke them into short pieces and laid on my belly and first counted by 1 to 100, then I took them and counted by 2 to 100 and so on. I have one sister who is older than I and I give her credit in raising me up to the teens. I was not old enough to work in slavery and know but little concerning slavery. Since freedom I have worked in the States of Georgia, Tennessee, Illinois, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Kansas and Oklahoma. I remember I went in my shirt tail in summer and same for winter with home-made outing underwear and no shoes ’til I was able and old enough to buy them for myself. I really didn’t have a master but had some mighty mean employers. Even though I came along in school age a few years before freedom, I had no teaching. I have made a success in life with...

Biographical Sketch of Capt. John Hamilton

Capt. John Hamilton, acting under orders from Gen. Zachary Taylor, founded Fort Scott, Kansas, in 1842. He was a native of Pennsylvania, a soldier in the regular army, and first came to Kansas as a youth of nineteen and a United States dragoon, stationed at Fort Leavenworth. In 1842, as a sergeant of the First Dragoons, under Capt. Benjamin D. Moore, he left Fort Wayne, Cherokee Nation, to assist in selecting a site and to establish a military post in Kansas. There wore twenty men in the party and, after selecting the ground, the captain and surgeon of the expedition, detailed directly under Sergeant Hamilton, returned to Fort Wayne, leaving the execution of the work to the latter. Sergeant Hamilton himself cut the first tree on the site of Fort Scott on the 9th of April, 1842, an additional working force was sent in the following month, and in June Captain Moore, with two companies of the First Dragoons, arrived to take command of the post. Maj. William M. Graham and Capt. Thomas Swords were afterwards placed in command, Hamilton being quartermaster sergeant under the latter. He was then appointed ordnance sergeant by the secretary of war and ordered to Fort Jessup, Louisiana. After serving his term of enlistment in the army Sergeant Hamilton returned to Fort Scott in March, 1855, and became a permaneut resident of that place. During the border troubles he was made captain of the first company of militia, which was organized in January, 1859, and experienced considerable rough service. In 1865 Captain Hamilton moved to Sheridan Township, Crawford County, and was elected from that...

Slave Narrative of Hecter Hamilton

Interviewer: Travis Jordan Person Interviewed: Hector Hamilton Location: North Carolina Age: 90 Ex-Slave 90 Years Dey wuz two General Lee’s, in de ‘Federate War. One los’ his fight, but de other won his. One of dese Generals wuz a white man dat rode a white hoss, an’ de other wuz a mean fightin’ gander dat I named General Lee, though I didn’ know den dat he wuz goin’ to live up to his name. But when de time come dat long neck gander out fit de whole ‘Federate army. My white fo’ks lived in Virginia. Dey wuz Marse Peter an’ Mis’ Laura Hamilton. Dey lived on de big Hamilton plantation dat wuz so big dat wid all de niggers dey had dey couldn’ ‘ten’ half of it. Dis lan’ done been handed down to Marse Peter from more den six gran’pappys. Dey wuz cotton an’ ‘bacca fields a mile wide; de wheat fields as far as yo’ could see wuz like a big sheet of green water, an’ it took half hour to plow one row of cawn, but dey wuz plenty of slaves to do de work. Mistah Sidney Effort, Marse Peter’s overseer, rode all over de fields every day, cussin’ an’ crackin’ his long blacksnake whip. He drove dem niggers like dey wuz cattle, but Marse Peter wouldn’ ‘low no beatin’ of his niggers. Marse Peter had acres an’ acres of woods dat wuz his huntin’ ‘zerve. Dey wuz every kind of bird an’ animal in dem woods in shootin’ season. Dey wuz snipes, pheasants, patridges, squirrels, rabbits, deers, an’ foxes; dey wuz even bears, an’ dey...

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