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Biography of William Hall

William Hall, the enterprising proprietor of Langdon Creamery, Langdon, N.H., and dealer in butter, cream, milk, eggs, chickens, pork, and other farm and dairy products, was born in Claremont, this State, March 23, 1850. He is a son of Jonathan and Caroline L. (Leet) Hall and a descendant of one of the oldest families in Sullivan County. Both his grandfather and his great-grandfather Hall bore the Christian name of Jonathan. Grandfather Hall was born August 25, 1776, in Spencer, Mass., whence he came to Langdon when a young man. He afterward removed to Claremont, where he died in 1854. In his active years he followed the occupations of a farmer, carpenter, and cooper; and he fought in the War of 1812. He married Sally Prouty, whose father was a very influential citizen of Spencer, Mass. She was born in 1779, and died in 1871. They were the parents of eleven children, two sons and nine daughters, Jonathan, third, being the youngest son. Jonathan Hall, third, was born in Langdon, June 19, 1815, and is now living in Keene, N.H. After leaving school, he learned the trade of a shoemaker and later that of a carpenter. Since then he has been variously employed as an architect, inventor, manufacturer, and millwright. Many of the machines built by C. B. Rogers, of Norwich, Conn., were designed by him. He was the builder of the only floating saw-mill known and built in Quebec, and the largest saw-mill in that Province, over one hundred men being employed in the construction work. Mention should also be made of the Orcutt, Charles Bridgeman, and Sprague Blocks...

Biographical Sketch of William Hall

William Hall and Elizabeth Hicks, who was his second wife, came from East Tennessee and settled in Montgomery County in 1817. Their children were Sarah, Elizabeth, Dorcas, Nancy, Laney, David, and Henry. Sarah married John Morrow, and they had thirteen children. Elizabeth married Elijah Waddell. Dorcas married Mark Cole, who was the first hatter in Montgomery County. Nancy Hall married John R. Crawford, who built his cabin in Montgomery County, in 1818. Among others who were present and assisted him to raise the cabin, were Daniel Boone and his sons Nathan and Jesse. Lewis Jones killed the game and cooked the dinner, and found a bee tree not far distant, from which they obtained fresh honey for their dinner. Crawford was noted for his ability to tell humorous yarns, and entertain a crowd. Laney Hall married Ephraim Hunter. David married Fanny Morrow. Henry married his cousin, Polly...

1867 Plymouth County Massachusetts Directory, Oil and Candle Manufacturers to Pump Makers

Oil and Candle Manufacturers  Judd L. S., Marion Organ Manufacturers Reynolds P., N. Bridgewater Marston A. B. Campello, Bridgewater Oysters and Refreshments (See Eating Houses) Nash J. E. Abington Douglas W. East Abington Gilman A. N., Bridgewater Fuller John, Bridgewater Hull J. C., Bridgewater Tripp B. F., Middleboro Union Saloon, Middleboro Grover R. B., No. Bridgewater Washburn and Richardson, No. Bridgewater Ballard S. D., Plymouth Dodge J. E., Plymouth Painters Carriage  Peirce Wm. M., Abington Ford B. F. East Abington Bates Asa, South Abington Hersey David A. Hingham Sprague Joseph T., Hingham Eldridge David, Kingston Boomer B. L., Middleboro Southworth Rodney E., Middleboro Sparrow J. G., North Bridge water Jones John B., North Bridge water Sargent Samuel, Bridge water Thomas William E., Bridge water Jones Charles L., Plymouth Young Charles, Scituate Young Edw., Scituate Painters (House and Sign) Davis W. H.. Abington French Joseph, Abington Ford B. F., East Abington Gilson L. C., East Abington Lawrence Thomas R., East Abington Lincoln S. B., North Abington Harding J. S., South Abington Beed Philip, South Abington Alden James S., Bridgewater Braman H. F. & J. G., Bridgewater Chandler Alden, Duxbury Hathaway Joshua W., Duxbury Sampson Alfred, Duxbury Grow & Wentworth, East Bridgewater Bonney E. P., Halifax Cook John, Halifax Bailey Melzer, Hanover Bryant Snow, Hanover Corbin Frank, Hanover Eells John P., Hanover Sturtevant George, Hanover Roberts John C., Hanson Cobb David, Hingham Cross and Lane, Hingham Hersey John P., Hingham Sprague J. and S., Hingham Bonney Geo H., Kingston Churchill L., Lakeville Barrows Elijah W., Lakeville Pickens H. C., Lakeville Parlow A. W., Marion Rogers Wm., W. Marshfield Dexter James W., Mattapoisett Jones Eben,...

Boyd County, Kentucky

BOYD CO. (Carl F. Hall) The Commonwealth of Kentucky, having for a northern boundary the Ohio River-the dividing line between the northern free states and the southern slave states has always been regarded as a southern state. As in the other states of the old south, slavery was an institution until the Thirteenth Ammendment to the Constitution of the United States gave the negro freedom in 1865. Kentucky did not, as other southern states, secede from the Union, but attempted to be neutral during the Civil War. The people, however, were divided in their allegience, furnishing recruits for both the Federal and Confederate armies. The president of the Union, Abraham Lincoln, and the president of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis, both were born in this state. Boyd County was formed in 1860 from parts of Lawrence, Greenup and Carter Counties, and we are unable to find any records, in Boyd County, as to slave holders and their slaves, though it is known that many well to do families the Catletts, Davis, Poages, Williams and others were slave holders. Slaves were not regarded as persons, had no civil rights and were owned just as any other chattel property, were bought and sold like horses and cattle, and knew no law but the will of their white masters and like other domestic animals could be, and were, acquired and disposed of without regard to family ties or other consideration. Usually, as each slave represented a large investment of money, they were well cared for, being adequately fed, clothed and sheltered, having medical attention when sick. As, along the border in Kentucky, there...

Slave Narrative of David A. Hall

Person Interviewed: David A. Hall Location: Canton, Ohio Place of Birth: Goldsboro, NC Date of Birth: July 25, 1847 Place of Residence: 1225 High Ave., S.W., Canton, Ohio Ohio Guide, Special Ex-Slave Stories August 16, 1937 DAVID A. HALL “I was born at Goldsboro, N.C., July 25, 1847. I never knew who owned my father, but my mother’s master’s name was Lifich Pamer. My mother did not live on the plantation but had a little cabin in town. You see, she worked as a cook in the hotel and her master wanted her to live close to her work. I was born in the cabin in town. “No, I never went to school, but I was taught a little by my master’s daughter, and can read and write a little. As a slave boy I had to work in the military school in Goldsboro. I waited on tables and washed dishes, but my wages went to my master the sane as my mother’s. “I was about fourteen when the war broke out, and remember when the Yankees came through our town. There was a Yankee soldier by the name of Kuhns who took charge of a Government Store. He would sell tobacco and such like to the soldiers. He was the man who told me I was free and then give me a job working in the store. “I had some brothers and sisters but I do not remember them-can’t tell you anything about them. “Our beds were homemade out of poplar lumber and we slept on straw ticks. We had good things to eat and a lot of...

Slave Narrative of Charley Watson

Interviewer: W. W. Dixon Person Interviewed: Charley Watson Location: South Carolina Age: 87 “Dis is a mighty hot day I tells you, and after climbing them steps I just got to fan myself befo’ I give answer to your questions. You got any ‘bacco I could chaw and a place to spit? Dis old darkie maybe answer more better if he be allowed to be placed lak dat at de beginnin’ of de ‘sperience. “Where was I born? Why right dere on de Hog Fork Place, thought everybody knowed dat! It was de home place of my old Marster Daniel Hall, one of de Rockefellers of his day and generation, I tells you, he sho was. My pappy had big name, my marster call him Denmore, my mammy went by de name of Mariyer. She was bought out of a drove from Virginny long befo’ de war. They both b’long to old marster and bless God live on de same place in a little log house. Let’s see; my brother Bill is one, he livin’ at de stone quarry at Salisbury, North Carolina. My sister Lugenie marry a Boulware nigger and they tells me dat woman done take dat nigger and make sumpin’ out of him. They owns their own automobile and livin’ in Cleveland, Ohio. “Us live in quarters, two string of houses a quarter mile long and just de width of a wagon road betwixt them. How many slaves marster had? Dere was four hundred in 1850, dat was de year I was born, so allowing for de natural ‘crease, ‘spect dere was good many more when...

Slave Narrative of Ida Henry

Person Interviewed: Ida Henry Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Marshall, Texas Date of Birth: 1854 Age: 83 Occupation: House Girl I was born in Marshall, Texas, in 1854. Me mother was named Millie Henderson and me father Silas Hall. Me mother was sold in South Carolina to Mister Hall, who brought her to Texas. Me father was born and raised by Master John Hall. Me mother’s and father’s family consisted of five girls and one boy. My sister’s names were: Margrette, Chalette, Lottie, Gracy and Loyo, and me brother’s name was Dock Howard. I lived with me mother and father in a log house on Master Hall’s plantation. We would be sorry when dark, as de patrollers would walk through de quarters and homes of de slaves all times of night wid pine torch lights to whip de niggers found away from deir home. At nights when me mother would slip away for a visit to some of de neighbors homes, she would raise up the old plank floor to de log cabin and make pallets on de ground and put us to bed and put the floor back down so dat we couldn’t be seen or found by the patrollers on their stroll around at nights. My grandmother Lottie would always tell us to not let Master catch you in a lie, and to always tell him de truth. I was house girl to me Mistress and nursed, cooked, and carried de children to and from school. In summer we girls wore cotton slips and yarn dresses for winter. When I got married I was dress...

Biographical Sketch of Erasmus D. Hall

Hall, Erasmus D., New Haven, was born in the town of New Haven, Addison county, Vt., on October 18, 1817 ; is a physician ; studied medicine at the Castleton Medical College, and began practice at St. Albans in 1844. He settled in New Haven, Vt., in 1850, where he has been in active practice ever since. He was twice married. His first wife was Eveline Sprague, to whom he was married in 1845. They had three children born to them — Francis, Genevieve, and Mary A. Eveline was a daughter of Anthony and Rhoda (Frisbie) Sprague. He was married the second time in 1866 to Marianne Landon, a daughter of Elisha H. and Charlotte (Hoyt) Landon. Mr. Hall was a son of Adin and Lucy (Sprague) Hall. His paternal grandfather, Richard Hall, was a native of Mansfield, Conn., who settled in New Haven Vt., in 1799. Adin Hall was born on September 25, 1786, and died on May 26, 1850. He studied medicine with Dr. Bass, of Middlebury, Vt., and practiced medicine in New Haven, Vt., for thirty-four years. He was a prominent physician of his day, and represented his town in the Legislature for three terms. His children were Edward (deceased), E. Darwin, Sophia, Julia...
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