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Charlton Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Charlton Massachusetts.

Muster Roll of Captain John D. Barnard’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain John D. Barnard’s Company of Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the sixth day of March, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Augusta, Maine, to the twenty-eighth day of March, 1839, when discharged or mustered.

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Free Masonry in Norwich Vermont

It does not appear that any Masonic Lodge has ever existed in Norwich. Quite a number of our citizens, however, as might be expected, have at different times belonged to lodges in adjacent towns. In the list of members of Franklin Lodge, established at Hanover, N. H., in 1796, we find the names of the following Norwich men, with the year of their admission: Reuben Hatch, Freegrace Leavitt (1798), William Sumner (1799), Thomas Brigham, Erastus Leavitt, and Moses Hayward (1800), Reuben Partridge, Andrew Dewey, William Little, Levi Richards, Aaron West (1801-1807), Lyman Lewis, Elijah Slafter, Simon Baldwin, Enos Lewis, Jasper Johnson, Noah Lewis (1808), Charles Hutchins, Sewell Gleason (1809), Ephraim Hall, George Olds, Jr., and Pierce Burton (1810), Manly G. Woodbury, Silas Morse, Ammi B. Allen, and Barzilla Bush, Jr. (1813-1820). The roll probably bears other Norwich names that we do not now recognize. The Franklin Lodge was moved to Lebanon in 1821, where it still flourishes. In 1807 and 1808, Doctor Thomas Brigham of Norwich was master of the lodge, who, on his sudden departure from town and abandonment of his family, was promptly expelled therefrom by notice published in the Vermont Journal at Windsor, in April, 1809, ”for immoral conduct unworthy a Mason and a gentleman.” Other Norwich Masons of that time, not of the Franklin Lodge, were Captain Calvin Seaver, Jeremiah Bissell, Ebenezer Spear, 2nd, Lyman Baldwin, and William Leconte. At the height of the Anti-Masonic agitation, about 1830, a great commotion was raised in the North Congregational Church, growing out of the refusal of the majority of the church, led by Deacon Israel Newton, to...

Postmasters and Postal Service in Norwich Vermont

It was fifteen years after the admission of Vermont into the Federal Union, and forty years after the settlement of the town, before Norwich had a post office. The first post office was established at Norwich Plain, July 1, 1805, and Jacob Burton was appointed postmaster. Postmaster Burton kept the office in his harness shop on the main street of the village, nearly opposite the present residence of Mrs. William E. Lewis. Probably the duties of the office were not so great as to interfere much with the prosecution of his trade. It is doubtful if Mr. Burton had more than two mails per week to distribute, and these were much smaller in bulk than either of the three daily mails now received at the village office. It is certain that less mail matter was then handled here in the course of a year than now in a week, although the territory accommodated at the office and the population of the town itself were each considerably greater than at present. It is safe to say, moreover, that the people now living in Norwich receive more letters and miscellaneous mail matter every year than did all the 150,000 inhabitants of Vermont in the year 1805. The post office is essentially a modern institution, whose importance and value increases year by year with cheaper postage and the general diffusion of cheap printed matter among the people. At the time of the admission of Vermont into the Union, in 1791, there were only five post offices in the State (at Brattleboro, Windsor, and Newbury on the Connecticut River, and at Bennington and...

History of Norwich Vermont Education

From the town records it appears that the first attempt to divide the town into school districts, was at a town meeting held November 19, 1782, when John Slafter, Elijah Brownson, Ithamar Bartlett, Joseph Loveland, Paul Bingham, Joseph Hatch, Daniel Baldwin, Abel Wilder and Samuel Brown, Jr., were made a committee for that purpose. Soon thereafter the committee reported that they “could effect nothing on the business of their appointment,” and were discharged. No further move in town meeting towards districting the town for school purposes appears to have been made until March 30, 1785, when, on petition of persons residing in the southeastern part of the town, the territory, to be described, was embraced in a district designated as the “First School District: Beginning at the southeast bound of Norwich; thence running on the line between Hartford and Norwich, two miles; thence northerly so wide as to include Benjamin Hatch and Benjamin Burton and Mr. John Knight; thence easterly so as to take into s’d district Nathaniel Brown, Esq., Esquire Elisha Partridge and the Rev. Lyman Potter; thence due east to Connecticut River.” At a town meeting held March 14, 1791, districts Nos. 1 to 12, both inclusive, were established; March 13, 1798, district No. 13 was organized; No. 14 (from the consolidation of districts 9 and 10) in 1818; No. 15 (Bicknell), in 1827; No. 16, March, 1828; No. 17, June, 1828; No. 19, March, 1834; No. 20, Oct. 20, 1834; No. 18 (Podunk), 1841. At a town meeting held in May, 1834, it was “voted to set off Ira Baxter, Isaac Partridge, Cyrus Partridge, and Calvin...

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Anson R. Gleason

Dr. Aaron R. Gleason, was born, June 1, 1835, in Warren, Vt., where he lived until twelve years of age, when his father, Windsor, moved to Acworth, N. H. He attended school and fitted for college at Westminster, Vt., and taught for two years, more or less, in the public schools. He studied medicine with Dr. K. D. Webster, of Gilsum, and Dr. George B. Twitchell, of Keene, pursued a course at the medical college at Burlington, Vt., at Washington, D. C., and at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York city. He enlisted in the 2d N. H. Vols., in September, 1861, and was with his regiment until September, 1863, when he was transferred to Campbell Hospital, Washington, D. C., and while there pursued the medical course at the Alexandria Medical College, and received his diploma in March 1864. He was commissioned assistant surgeon of the 14th N. H. Vols., May 11, 1864, but he declined, preferring hospital duty. In September, 1865, he returned to his home in New Hampshire. During the same autumn he went to New York and attended a course at the College of Physicians and Surgeons. In the spring of 1866, he located in Fitzwilliam, where he has since continued to practice. He has been a member of the school board about fifteen years, and was town representative in 1851 and 1882. He married, January 19, 1869, Etta E., only child of Dr. K. D. Webster, of Gilsum, and has one daughter, Maude...

Biographical Sketch of Parsons Gleason

PARSONS GLEASON. – Mr. Parsons Gleason is one of the oldest and most venerable of our pioneers now living, having been born in Rutland county, Vermont, in 1799. At the age of six years he moved with his father to Western New York, and at the age of twenty-one went out to Indiana, and three years later had drifted as far as the Indian Territory, and was with the missionaries for three years among the Osage Indians. Three years later he went on to Indiana, making his home at South Bend. In tat state he married and made his residence, forming a great attachment to the old military hero and political chieftain, W.H. Harrison, with whom he became intimately acquainted. In 1851 he made the great journey across the plains to Oregon, thereby becoming one of the earliest settlers in our state. he made his home at the place first humorously called “Hard Scrabble,” but later translated as “Needy,” in Clackamas county. Here he has passed a long, active and honorable life, and still lives at the age of...

Biography of A. B. Gleason

A.B. GLEASON. – This gentleman is the son of Parsons Gleason, and is now one of the active business men of the state. He was born May 22, 1829, in Ripley county, Indiana. In 1849 he entered upon life as boatman on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, and in 1851 came with his father to the Pacific coast. The trip through Illinois and Missouri he made by himself with ox-teams, while the rest of the family performed this portion of the journey by water. With a train of twelve wagons, and numbering among their companions Mr. Clinton ad Reverend Mr. Chandler, they made the memorable journey, having excellent fortune the entire distance, – a splendid trip. Arriving in our state, young Gleason made an excursion to the Rogue river mines, and returning took, in 1853, a tour of the Puget Sound country, finding at length employment with Governor Stevens as superintendent of his farm. In 1855, however, he relinquished this position to volunteer in the service against the Indians, becoming a member of Captain Hay’s company. After a three months’ service, he returned for a short visit to his father’s home, and soon made what was then the adventurous trip to the Atlantic states via Nicaragua. Visiting in Iowa he was there married to Miss Clarissa Town, and soon after returning via Panama to is Oregon home. Two years he lived on his claim, but found business more congenial, and has up to the present time been engaged in milling, merchandising and dealing in grain at various points in the state. In 1870 he became the pioneer and in...

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