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The Spaniards in Alabama and Mississippi

England, having lost her West Florida provinces by the victories of Galvez, and having the American Whigs, as well as the natives of France, Spain and Holland, arrayed against her, was finally forced to retire from the unequal contest. A preliminary treaty of peace was signed at Paris. England there acknowledged our independence, and admitted our southern boundary to be as follows: A line beginning at the Mississippi, at 31° north of the equator, and extending due east to the Chattahoochie River; down that river to the mouth of the Flint, and thence to the St. Mary’s, and along that river to the sea. Great Britain also expressly stipulated, in that treaty, our right to the navigation of the Mississippi River, from its mouth to its source. Jan. 20 1783: Great Britain and Spain entered into a treaty. The former warranted and confirmed to the latter the province of West Florida, and ceded to her East Florida.1 But although England, by the treaty of 1782, assigned to the United States all the territory between the Mississippi and the Chattahoochie, lying between the parallels of latitude 31° and 32° 28′, embracing the same portion of the territory of Alabama and Mississippi, which lay in the British province of West Florida, yet it was not surrendered to us by Spain for years afterwards. Spain occupied it, contending that Great Britain, in the treaty with her, in 1783, warranted the province of West Florida to her, not defining its northern limits, and that England had no right to restrict her limits, even if she had attempted it, for Spain had, before the...

Early Incidents in the Mississippi Territory

Napoleon Bonaparte had turned his eagle eye to the rich province of Louisiana, and it was ceded by Spain to France. He contemplated its occupation, with a large army, and probably entertained designs of conquest against portions of the United States; but, becoming deeply involved in wars with the whole of Europe, he reluctantly relinquished these intentions, and ceded Louisiana to the United States for sixty millions of francs. Governor Claiborne, with a large number of emigrants, who had already flocked to Natchez from all parts of the Union for the purpose of occupying Louisiana, sailed down the Mississippi, with Wilkinson and his forces, and took formal possession of the city of New Orleans, in behalf of the United States. He had been appointed the Governor of the Louisiana Territory. He left the people of the Mississippi Territory duly impressed with a deep sense of obligation for his valuable public services. Cato West, the Territorial Secretary, discharged the executive duties until his successor arrived. The distance of Natchez from the Tombigby was so great that Congress authorized the President to appoint an additional Superior Court Judge for the benefit of the people settled upon that river. The Hon. Harry Toulmin was selected. He was born at Taunton, in England, the 7th April 1766, and descended from a learned and respectable family. He became a pastor of the Unitarian church, at Chowbert, in Lancashire, in 1788, where he occupied a prominent position, officiating before a congregation of a thousand hearers. Becoming an object of suspicion to the government, it determined to silence not only his efforts, but those of every...

Biography of Samuel S. Glasscock, M. D.

Samuel S. Glasscock, M. D. That “an institution is but the lengthened shadow of a man” has an unusual and more than nominal application in the case of the Grand View Sanitarium of Kansas City, Kansas. For thirteen years this Institution has realized the highest standards and ideals of a real sanitarium because it has been permeated by the personality and the ability of Dr. S. S. Glasscock, whose reputation as an authority on mental and nervous diseases is accepted and credited among the leaders of the profession all over the Middle West. In 1898, at 26th and Ridge Avenue, F. M. Bidwell began what is now the Grand View Sanitarium. Originally it was designed merely to take care of county cases. At first its capacity was for about eighteen or twenty cases. In 1903 Dr. George M. Gray, S. S. Glasscock and F. M. Tracy, all prominent members of the medical profession of Kansas City, Kansas, leased the property for two years, and converted it into a sanitarium. In 1905 Doctors Glasscock and Tracy bought the property and made a number of changes in the physical structure and equipment. In 1910 Doctor Glasscock became proprietor of the institution and has since held the majority of the stock, the principal minor stockholder being Dr. A. L. Ludwig. In 1911 an addition of twenty rooms with private baths was added, and the institution now has a capacity for fifty patients. The sanitarium is devoted primarily to the care of persons suffering from mental and nervous diseases and drug addicts. The Grand View Sanitarium is a corporation with a capital of...

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