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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Viola Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Allen, Charles F. Wf. Libbie; ch. Ray and Fred. P. O. Gray, R. 1. O. 468.64 ac., sec. 7. (40.) Allen, R. L. Wf. Laura. P. O. Gray, R. 1. R. 160ac., sec. 7. (20.) Owner, Chas. F. Allen. Anderson, Charles. Ch. Jennie, Fred, Frank and John. P. O. Coon Rapids, R. 3. O. 298.41 ac., sec. 1;O. 40 ac., sec. 12. (27.) Anderson, D. B. Wf. Lillie; ch. Bessie, Nellie, Alice, Mary and Hope. P. O. Audubon, R. 2. O. 320 ac., sec. 34. (46.) Bamsey, G. C. Wf. Phoebe; ch. Russell, Ralph, Lewis and Arlene. P. O. Ross, R. 1. O. 80 ac., sec. 30; O. 80 ac., sec. 29. (30.) Beck, C. M. Wf. Mary; ch. Carl, Harry and Hans. P. O. Ross, R. 1. O. 159 ac., sec. 22. (28.) Bonney, John J. Wf. Francis; ch. John and Harold. P. O. Coon Rapids, R. 3. R. 80 ac., sec. 2; R. 80 ac., sec. 11. (3.) Breeder of Duroc Jersey Hogs. Owner, J. C. Bonwell. Bonwell, John C. Ch. Pauline, Gertrude and Leora. P. O. Ross, R. 1. O. 480 ac., sec. 28; O. 80 ac., sec. 27; O. 160 ac., sec. 1; O. 80 ac., sec. 12; O. 80 ac., sec. 2; O. 80 ac., sec. 11. (46.)Breeder of Polled Hereford Cattle. “Viola Center Farm.” Boyer, H. C. Wf. Grace; ch. Jimmie and Joseph. P. O. Audubon, R. 2. R. 160 ac., sec. 35. (29.) Owner, Elizabeth A. Hinkson. Brannan, James H. Wf. Ellen; ch....

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the world, have pursued “the even tenor of their way,” content to have it said of them, as Christ said of the woman performing a deed of mercy – “They have done what they could.” It tells how that many in the pride and strength of young manhood left the plow and the anvil, the lawyer’s office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country’s call went forth valiantly “to do or die,” and how through their efforts the Union was restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. Genealogists will appreciate this volume from the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which would otherwise be inaccessible. Great...

History of Norwich Vermont Education

From the town records it appears that the first attempt to divide the town into school districts, was at a town meeting held November 19, 1782, when John Slafter, Elijah Brownson, Ithamar Bartlett, Joseph Loveland, Paul Bingham, Joseph Hatch, Daniel Baldwin, Abel Wilder and Samuel Brown, Jr., were made a committee for that purpose. Soon thereafter the committee reported that they “could effect nothing on the business of their appointment,” and were discharged. No further move in town meeting towards districting the town for school purposes appears to have been made until March 30, 1785, when, on petition of persons residing in the southeastern part of the town, the territory, to be described, was embraced in a district designated as the “First School District: Beginning at the southeast bound of Norwich; thence running on the line between Hartford and Norwich, two miles; thence northerly so wide as to include Benjamin Hatch and Benjamin Burton and Mr. John Knight; thence easterly so as to take into s’d district Nathaniel Brown, Esq., Esquire Elisha Partridge and the Rev. Lyman Potter; thence due east to Connecticut River.” At a town meeting held March 14, 1791, districts Nos. 1 to 12, both inclusive, were established; March 13, 1798, district No. 13 was organized; No. 14 (from the consolidation of districts 9 and 10) in 1818; No. 15 (Bicknell), in 1827; No. 16, March, 1828; No. 17, June, 1828; No. 19, March, 1834; No. 20, Oct. 20, 1834; No. 18 (Podunk), 1841. At a town meeting held in May, 1834, it was “voted to set off Ira Baxter, Isaac Partridge, Cyrus Partridge, and Calvin...

Norwich Vermont in the Revolutionary War

The sources of information in regard to the part taken by the town in the Revolutionary struggle are few and scanty. The earliest allusion in the town records to this important epoch of the country’s history is found in the election of a Committee of Safety at the annual town meeting, March 11, 1777. This committee was five in number: Deacon Joseph Smalley, Samuel Hutchinson, John Hatch, Captain Hezekiah Johnson and John Hopson. There is much reason to believe, however, that this was not the first Committee of Safety that acted for the town; but was a new committee selected to conform to a recommendation made to the towns in Cumberland and Gloucester Counties by the Convention at Westminster which declared the independence of Vermont the preceding January.1 It is pretty certain that a company of militia was organized in Norwich as early as the year 1774 or 1775. Of this company Peter Olcott was chosen Captain and Thomas Murdock, Ensign, doubtless by the votes of the men enrolled in the same. The company was probably a purely voluntary organization of patriotic young men, in Colonel Seth Warner‘s regiment of Rangers in 1775, in the continental service. Colonel Timothy Bedell, of Haverhill, N. H., also raised a regiment the same year for service in Canada. Fresh regiments were enlisted early in the spring of 1776, by both Colonel Bedell and Colonel Warner. Again on the 7th of March Colonel Morey writes to the New Hampshire Committee of Safety: “Some recruiting officers from Colonel Warner‘s party [regiment] have enlisted a considerable number of fine men, they had the money to...

Church History of Norwich Vermont

The great achievement of the first generation of Norwich settlers was the building of a meeting house. More than any other event of the time, with the possible exception of the accomplishment of the national independence, this was an undertaking that enlisted the energies and taxed the resources of our forefathers. The building of a meeting house in a New England frontier settlement a century ago was regarded a matter of public concern, to be supported by the whole community without regard to sect or party, like the opening of roads or any other public charge. In less than ten years from the time the first clearing was made in Norwich, the preliminary steps were taken to provide a meeting house to be used for the accommodation of the whole people in the public worship of God. The question of the location of this building was sharply agitated, re-resulting in a keen competition between different sections of the town for the coveted distinction, inasmuch as the location of the house was supposed to fix the site of a possible future village where much of the business of the town would be transacted. When it became apparent that no agreement could be reached, a locating committee of three men from out of town was chosen and summoned upon the ground to decide where the meeting house should stand. The formal report of this Committee as made at the time has recently been found among the papers of the late W. H. Duncan, Esq., of Hanover, N. H., and by the kindness of Honorable Frederick Chase has been furnished to the...

Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson – Indian Captivities

Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, Wife of the Rev. Joseph Rowlandson, Who Was Taken Prisoner when Lancaster was Destroyed, in the Year 1676; Written by Herself. On the 10th of February, 1676, came the Indians with great numbers ((Fifteen hundred was the number, according to the best authorities. They were the Wamponoags, led by King Philip, accompanied by the Narrhagansett, his allies, and also by the Nipmucks and Nashaways whom his artful eloquence had persuaded to join with him.)) upon Lancaster: their first coming was about sun-rising. Hearing the noise of some guns, we looked out; several houses were burning, and the smoke ascending to heaven. There were five persons taken in one house; the father and mother, and a sucking child they knocked on the head, the other two they took and carried away alive. There were two others, who, being out of their garrison upon occasion, were set upon, one was knocked on the head, the other escaped. Another there was, who, running along, was shot and wounded, and fell down; he begged of them his life, promising them money, as they told me, but they would not hearken to him, but knocked him on the head, stripped him naked, and split open his bowels. Another, seeing many of the Indians about his barn, ventured and went out, but was quickly shot down. There were three others belonging to the same garrison who were killed; the Indians getting up upon the roof of the barn, had advantage to shoot down upon them over their fortification. Thus these murderous wretches went on burning and destroying all before them.1 At length they came...

Biographical Sketch of G.M. Gilbert

G.M. Gilbert, merchant tailor, was born in Brattleboro, Vt., in 1844, where he lived until 1862, when he enlisted in Co. B., 16th V.V. His term of enlistment expired a few days before the battle of Gettysburg, but his regiment took an active part in the engagement, and but few returned. He came to Ill. in 1864, and removed to this city in 1870. Mr. Gilbert established his business in Sioux City in 1873, and as the fruits of his proficiency and ability to please the purchasing public, has acquired a very extensive patronage of the most desirable kind, embracing, in addition to the Iowa trade, portions of Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota and...

Biographical Sketch of Dexter W. Gilbert

Dexter W. Gilbert was born in Walpole, July 19, 1832, attended the common schools and the Saxtons River seminary, Walpole academy and Mount Caesar seminary, was a teacher for several years in the public schools in New England and New York, and a house carpenter by trade. He has resided in Massachusetts, New York, wasconsin, Indiana and Ohio, and came to Keene in 1864, where he has since lived. He was superintendent of the suburban schools of Keene, 1874-78, served two years in each branch of the city government, from 1819 to 1882. In politics he is a Republican, in religion a Freethinker, much interested in the cause of education, and fully believing 1n the maxim that “ignorance is the evil, knowledge the remedy.” He was married in Newburyport, Mass., October 17, 1856, to Eliza J. Cooley, and has two children, Ethan Allen, born February 26, 1862, and Charles Frederick, March 7,...

Biography of Allan Arthur Gilbert, M.D.

Dr. Allan Arthur Gilbert, an internist of St. Louis, who in his practice has gained high professional standing, was born in Burrton, Kansas, May 26, 1890, a son of the Rev. H. M. Gilbert, who was born in South Carolina, but was descended from one of the old families of Connecticut of English lineage. The progenitor of the family in the new world was Mathew Gilbert, who came across the Atlantic on the historic Mayflower and was the first deputy governor of Connecticut under King George. Among the ancestors of Dr. Gilbert was also Colonel Ethan Allen, who commanded the famous Green Mountain boys in the Revolutionary war. Rev. H. M. Gilbert was a graduate of Vanderbilt University, attending the Theological Seminary and also was gradauted from Wafford College. He received his Doctor of Divinity degree from Vanderbilt and devoted his entire life to the ministry of the Presbyterian church. He is now a representative of the Presbyterian Board of Ministerial Relief and resides in St. Louis, but has his business headquarters in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He married Clara Elizabeth Fulton, a native of Illinois. Her father was Isaac B. Fulton, a pioneer of that state and also of Kansas and after removing to the west be served as a member of the state legislature of Kansas for a number of terms and was very active in republican politics. He was likewise a prominent member of the Grand Army of the Republic, for he had served through the Civil war as a sergeant and was wounded in the battle of Chickamauga. His daughter, Mrs. Gilbert, is still living and to...

Slave Narrative of Taylor Gilbert

Interviewer: Alfred Farrell Person Interviewed: Taylor Gilbert Location: Titusville, Florida Age: 91 Occupation: Farmer Taylor Gilbert was born in Shellman, Georgia, 91 years ago, of a colored mother and a white father, “which is why I am so white”, he adds. He has never been known to have passed as White, however, in spite of the fact that he could do so without detection. David Ferguson bought Jacob Gilbert from Dr. Gilbert as a husband for Emily, Taylor’s mother. Emily had nine children, two by a white man, Frances and Taylor, and seven by Jacob, only three of whom Gilbert remembers – Gettie, Rena, and Annis. Two of these children were sent to school while the others were obliged to work on the plantation. Emily, the mother, was the cook and washwoman while Jacob was the Butler. Gilbert, a good sized lad when slavery was at its height, recalls vividly the cruel lashings and other punishments meted out to those who disobeyed their master or attempted to run away. It was the custom of slaves who wished to go from one plantation to another to carry passes in case they were stopped as suspected runaways. Frequently slaves would visit without benefit of passes, and as result they suffered severe torturing. Often the sons of the slaves’ owners would go “nigger hunting” and nothing – not even murder was too horrible for them to do to slaves caught without passes. They justified their fiendish acts by saying the “nigger tried to run away when told to stop.” Gilbert cannot remember when he came to Florida, but he claims that it...
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