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Archer Family of Fall River, MA

ARCHER (Fall River family). Through much of the nineteenth century the name opening this article was a most highly esteemed and respected one at Fall River, made so by the lives of the late Jason H. Archer, M. D., of the medical profession, and his son, the late John Jason Archer, Esq., for years one of the learned members of the Fall River bar. The home at least for a time of this Fall River Archer family was in the nearby town of Wrentham, in Norfolk county, where lived Amos Archer, father of Dr. Jason H. Archer and grandfather of the late John Jason Archer, Esq. While the Wrentham vital records do not show the Archers among the town’s early inhabitants the Archers as a family were here in Massachusetts in its early Colonial period. One Samuel Archer (name spelled in the early Essex county records Arehard) was living in Salem as early as 1630, as on Oct, 19th of that year he took the freeman’s oath there. He was born between 1602 and 1615, and was a carpenter. He was a member of the First Church before 1636; was constable of the town in 1657; and marshal from 1654 until his decease. He died in December, 1667. His wife Susanna survived him, and married (second) Richard Hutchinson in October, 1668. His children, born in Salem, Mass., were: Hannah, born in Salem; Samuel, born in 1634-35, married Hannah Osgood, of Andover, and lived in 1632, married Matthew Dove, a planter of Salem, a house carpenter; John, born in 1638, married Bethiah Weeks, and lived in Salem, a cooper; Bethiah...

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic; and yet candor and the truth of history compels us to confess that there were here, as in most other towns throughout the north, a few disloyal spirits who sympathized with the Slaveholders’ rebellion, who denounced the war from beginning to end, and who scarcely concealed their satisfaction when news came of rebel...

Slave Narrative of Isaac Adams

Person Interviewed: Issac Adams Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Louisiana Age: 87 I was born in Louisiana, way before the War. I think it was about ten years before, because I can remember everything so well about the start of the War, and I believe I was about ten years old. My Mammy belonged to Mr. Sack P. Gee . I don’t know what his real given name was, but it maybe was Saxon. Anyways we all called him Master Sack. He was a kind of youngish man, and was mighty rich. I think he was born in England. Anyway his pappy was from England, and I think he went back before I was born. Master Sack had a big plantation ten miles north of Arcadia, Louisiana, and his land run ten miles along both sides. He would leave in a buggy and be gone all day and still not get all over it. There was all kinds of land on it, and he raised cane and oats and wheat and lots of corn and cotton. His cotton fields was the biggest any wheres in that part, and when chopping and picking times come he would get Negroes from other people to help out. I never was no good at picking, but I was a terror with a hoe! I was the only child my Mammy had. She was just a young girl, and my Master did not own her very long. He got her from Mr. Addison Hilliard, where my pappy belonged. I think she was going to have me when he got her; anyways I come...

Biographical Sketch of James McCreary Gee

Gee, James McCreary; real estate broker; born, Kingsville, O., Dee. 24, 1875; son of Francis W. and Mary McCreary Gee; educated, common and high schools, Allegheny College, Meadville, Pa.; Western Reserve University, Law Dept.; married, Marysville, N. Y., June 6, 1900, Helen Mills; issue, Francis, born March 30, 1901, Daniel, born Dec. 7, 1904, Nicholas, born Feb. 24, 1908, and Caroline, born May 9, 1911; member Corps of Cadets, Allegheny College; Republican; traveling salesman before settling in Cleveland; in 1902, engaged in the life insurance business as asst. supt. of The Prudential Life Ins. Co.; in 1904-1905, mgr. sales and technical dept. of the Hapgood Incorporation; 1905-1908, pres. The Cleveland Sales Co., handling stock and bonds of local nature; pres. The Colonial Automobile Co., The Kelley Island Telephone & Electric Co.; sec’y The Wager Motor Co.; now engaged in the real estate brokerage business with F. B. Guinan, giving special attention to investments properties and long-time leases; member Knights of Pythias Lodge, No. 133, Phi Delta Theta from. Pa., Delta; member Alumni Club of Phi Delta...

Biography of Samuel M. Gee

Samuel M. Gee, farmer and dairyman residing two and one-half miles northwest of Nowata, Nowata County, was born in Clinton County, Indiana, on the 23d of May, 1864, a son of Moses G. and Catherine (Maish) Gee. The father was a native of Ohio, where he lived until he removed to Indian Territory. He died at Council Hill in 1910. Mrs. Gee was born in Pennsylvania and died in Missouri in 1907. In January, 1902 Samuel M. Gee came to Indian Territory and located at Adair, where he rented four hundred acres of land, which he farmed for four years. At the termination of that time he went to Ruby and he has engaged in farming and stock raising from that time to the present. For three years he remained in Ruby and subsequently came to his present place, two and one-half miles northwest of Nowata, where he has two hundred and fifty-five acres of the finest land in Nowata County. He has raised thirty-five bushels of wheat to the acre, sixty bushels of corn and sixty-five bushels of oats. This was all wild prairie land when Mr. Gee took possession. In addition to the home place he rents three hundred and eighty-five acres adjoining his land, cultivating three hundred acres. He is likewise active in the conduct of a dairy and milks an average of twenty head of cows, Jersey and shorthorn mixed. Mr. Gee raises registered shorthorns, of which he has sold many, but retains the best for breeding purposes. He never has on hand less than two hundred head of cattle, which he houses in the...

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