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Postmasters and Postal Service in Norwich Vermont

It was fifteen years after the admission of Vermont into the Federal Union, and forty years after the settlement of the town, before Norwich had a post office. The first post office was established at Norwich Plain, July 1, 1805, and Jacob Burton was appointed postmaster. Postmaster Burton kept the office in his harness shop on the main street of the village, nearly opposite the present residence of Mrs. William E. Lewis. Probably the duties of the office were not so great as to interfere much with the prosecution of his trade. It is doubtful if Mr. Burton had more than two mails per week to distribute, and these were much smaller in bulk than either of the three daily mails now received at the village office. It is certain that less mail matter was then handled here in the course of a year than now in a week, although the territory accommodated at the office and the population of the town itself were each considerably greater than at present. It is safe to say, moreover, that the people now living in Norwich receive more letters and miscellaneous mail matter every year than did all the 150,000 inhabitants of Vermont in the year 1805. The post office is essentially a modern institution, whose importance and value increases year by year with cheaper postage and the general diffusion of cheap printed matter among the people. At the time of the admission of Vermont into the Union, in 1791, there were only five post offices in the State (at Brattleboro, Windsor, and Newbury on the Connecticut River, and at Bennington and...

Church History of Norwich Vermont

The great achievement of the first generation of Norwich settlers was the building of a meeting house. More than any other event of the time, with the possible exception of the accomplishment of the national independence, this was an undertaking that enlisted the energies and taxed the resources of our forefathers. The building of a meeting house in a New England frontier settlement a century ago was regarded a matter of public concern, to be supported by the whole community without regard to sect or party, like the opening of roads or any other public charge. In less than ten years from the time the first clearing was made in Norwich, the preliminary steps were taken to provide a meeting house to be used for the accommodation of the whole people in the public worship of God. The question of the location of this building was sharply agitated, re-resulting in a keen competition between different sections of the town for the coveted distinction, inasmuch as the location of the house was supposed to fix the site of a possible future village where much of the business of the town would be transacted. When it became apparent that no agreement could be reached, a locating committee of three men from out of town was chosen and summoned upon the ground to decide where the meeting house should stand. The formal report of this Committee as made at the time has recently been found among the papers of the late W. H. Duncan, Esq., of Hanover, N. H., and by the kindness of Honorable Frederick Chase has been furnished to the...

Biography of John Gallup

John Gallup, assistant treasurer of the Missouri Portland Cement Company comes to the Mississippi valley from New England, where the family has been represented since early colonial days. He was born in Mystic, Connecticut, December 14, 1844, son of John Gallup and Roxanna Fish. He received his education in the public schools of Mystic, Connecticut, and also studied under private tutors. After leaving school he gave special attention to accounting and later was associated with his father in the lumber business. In Mystic, Connecticut, October 5, 1870, Mr. Gallup was married to Ellen E. Noyes, daughter of George W. and Prudence Dean Brown Noyes. One child was born to them, Mary Elisabeth, now the wife of Harry F. Roach of St. Louis, Missouri. In 1880, Mr. Gallup came to Peoria, Illinois, and there took charge of the office work of S. C. Bartlett & Company, grain dealers, and when the firm established a branch business at La Fayette, Indiana, he became office manager there and so continued for five years. In 1887 Mr. Gallup came to St. Louis and was offered the position of auditor and treasurer of the St. Louis, Kansas City and Colorado Railroad, a new line being built out of St. Louis to Kansas City. The Santa Fe afterward purchased the Frisco, when the management was merged into that of the Frisco. In October, 1895, Mr. Gallup became connected with the Missouri Portland Cement Company, with which he has since held executive positions, serving now as assistant treasurer. His connection with the company covers more than a quarter of a century and he has witnessed and...

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