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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

History of the Methodist Church at Norwich Vermont

Prior to the year 1800, Methodism had scarcely gained a foothold in Vermont. The first Methodist society in the State is said to have been formed at Vershire by Nicholas Suethen in 1796. Two years later, only one hundred church members were returned as residents in the Vershire Circuit, then including the whole of eastern Vermont. Zadock Thompson, in the first edition of his Gazetteer of Vermont, published in 1824, gives the number of preachers, traveling and local, at that time as about one hundred, and the number of societies much greater. Probably no religious body ever made so rapid a growth in the state or the country as did the Methodists during the first twenty-five years of the nineteenth century. Although largely outnumbering every other at the present time, its later rate of increase is comparatively slow. We have no information that fixes the time at which Methodist meetings began to be held in Norwich. The earliest preaching was by circuit preachers, and of these Eleazer Wells and Nathaniel Stearns were among the first. Both of these men had the certificates of their ordination to the ministry (as early as 1810 or 1811) by Bishop McKendree entered upon the town records, and both doubtless labored here more or less about that time. Rev. Amasa Taylor was also here some part of the time about 1813. About 1815, the first church building was erected by the Methodists, a wooden structure of modest dimensions, which stood near the forks of the highway leading from Union Village to Norwich Plain, and about two miles south of the former place. Some members...

Biography of George J. Gale

George James Gale, for twenty-seven years Clerk of the County Council of Grey, was born in Hampstead, England, August 1, 1819, being the son of George Gale, a florist. In his fourteenth year he came to Lower Canada, and to three years steady schooling in the old country, added a few terms at an Academy; then clerked ten years in a dry goods store in the city of Quebec, and one season in a store in Kingston; and was subsequently a merchant two years in Montreal. In July, 1843, Mr. Gale settled in the County of Grey, and the Township of Derby, adjoining Owen Sound, which at one time was included in that township. At an early day he was engaged in a variety of business pursuits merchandising, real estate, &c. He has also held a great variety of officesClerk of Township of Derby; member of the first Town Council of Owen Sound (185); Commissioner in Court of Queen’s Bench (appointed in 1849); Clerk of the Division Court, Owen Sound; Official Assignee for the County; School Superintendent, and Clerk of the Council, still holding the last office; Lieut. Colonel 3rd Battery Grey Militia. During the last eleven or twelve years Mr. Gale has been afflicted with nervous debility, unfitting him for manual labor, his only son and child living, John Gale, attending to his father’s official duties. The mind of Mr. Gale is clear and active, his memory especially being strong and tenacious. It was Mr. Gale who, as Auctioneer, sold the Indian Peninsula after it had been ceded to the Government by the Indians, a great crowd being...

Gale, Mildred Emily Griffith Mrs. – Obituary

Mildred Emily Gale, 92, went peacefully to be with her Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ on July 17, 2009. For the past six years she had been with her daughter Pam Murphy and family in Boulder City, Nev. Several of the family had returned with her only the evening before to her big yellow house on the corner of College and B. Mildred’s services were at Gray’s West and Company July 24, 2009, followed by her burial at Mt. Hope Cemetery and a graciously hosted reception at the Methodist Church. The fifth of seven children, she was born Mildred Emily Griffith November 09, 1916, at Dixie, Oregon, to Glen and Gladys Griffith. After a glorious childhood in a loving family she graduated from Huntington High School in 1935 and Eastern Oregon Normal School in La Grande in 1937. While teaching at the Plano one-room school house she was wooed by Henry Gale, president of the local grange. She spent her second year as principal at Pleasant Valley and married Henry June 10, 1939. Henry’s grange sent them on their honeymoon to the San Francisco World Fair. For nearly 40 of their 50 years of marriage they owned and operated Gale’s Grocery (Market) on Broadway across from the Junior High School. Mildred, who both worked and played hard, enjoyed many pastimes—gardening, croquet, snow skiing, backpacking, and more. For several winters she and Henry flooded their own vacant lot, turning it into an ice skating rink for all to partake. After their daughter Pam graduated from high school the Gales began filling their home with foster children—more than 50 in all....

Biography of Benjamin F. Gale

Benjamin F. Gale, who was for many years a prominent citizen of Concord, was born May 13, 1819. His grandfather, Daniel Gale, a son of Captain Benjamin Gale, was a native of Haverhill, Mass. A blacksmith by trade, Daniel came at the age of twenty to Concord, and here married Ruth Carter, a daughter of Dr. Ezra Carter, the first physician of Concord. The father, Benjamin Gale, kept a tavern at the corner of Warren and Main Streets in Concord for forty years. This was in the days of the old stage-coach, before the railroad was built; and the greater part of the travellers of that time stopped with Landlord Gale. He had an extensive acquaintance, Prudence, was a daughter of James Varnum, a soldier who served seven years in the War of Independence, and a comrade of ex-Governor Pierce, of this State. Benjamin and Prudence Gale reared six children-James V., Ruth C., Eleanor V., John V., Benjamin F., and Levi B. The only one of these now living is Eleanor, who resides in the West, nearly ninety years of age. The father died August 11, 1856. Benjamin F. Gale received his education from the district schools and in the academies at Francestown and Hopkinton. Later on he taught school in Francestown Academy. At the age of twenty-one years he was a surveyor, and went to the West in order to secure employment in the government land surveys. Here, however, he was taken sick of fever, and was obliged to return home. He then bought the Kemp pasture, a stretch of fifty acres, all being good house lots. Afterward...

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