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Genealogy of Lawrence Albert Stoneburner

Lawrence, son of Linzie Otis and Ella Stoneburner, continued the occupation of farming. On 26 February 1924 he married Goldie Ardath Spracklin in Christian Co., Ill. She was the daughter of Grace Belle Austin and George E. Spracklin, also residents of Shelby Co., Ill. On Sunday, July 5, 1925, “Lawrence Stoneburner was given a birthday surprise by his wife. At the noon hour about 40 of his relatives and friends gathered with well-filled baskets and a big dinner was spread under the trees on the lawn. Among the good things to eat were five big cakes. Mr. Stoneburner received a number of nice presents. Those present were her. and Mrs. John 14 I. Stoneburner, his grandparents; Mr. and Firs. Tom McConnell and son Tony; Mr. and Mrs. George Spracklin and family; Mr. and Mrs. L. O. Stoneburner and family; Bert and Hazel McDaniels and son Richard of Springfield; Thomas, Richard and Lena Bennett; John Stoneburner’s family; Lyman Stoneburner and family; and Bill Stoneburner. The afternoon was spent in swimming and eating ice cream. All departed a late hour wishing Mr. Stoneburner many more happy birthdays.’ In later years their farm was situated in Cold Spring Township. In the fall of 1964 Lawrence and Goldie retired from the farm and moved to a home in Shelbyville, Illinois. Lawrence died that following spring. “Lawrence A. Stoneburner of Shelbyville passed away at the Shelby County Memorial Hospital at 8:20 a.m. today. Funeral services will be at 2:00 pm Friday at the Lockart and Son Funeral Home, with burial in Glenwood Cemetery. Friends may call at the funeral home after 5 Pm Thursday....

Slave Narrative of Jessie Rowell

Person Interviewed: Jessie Rowell Location: Dade County, Florida Jessie Rowell, 331 NW 19th St., Miami, Florida was born in Mississippi, between Fossburg and Heidelberg, on the Gaddis plantation. “My grandmother worked in the house, but my mother worked in the field hoeing or picking cotton or whatever there was to do. I was too little to work. “All that I can ‘member is, that I was just a little tot running ’round, and I would always watch for my mother to come home. I was always glad to see her, for the day was long and I knew she’d cook something for me to eat. I can ‘member dat es good as ’twas yestiday. “We ‘stayed on’ after Freedom. Mother was give wages then, but I don’t know how...

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