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Barker Genealogy of Tiverton, RI

The Barker family of Tiverton, R. I., and vicinity, represented in that section by many prominent citizens, is one of the earliest settled families of New England. The first of the name of whom there is authentic record was Robert Barker, born in 1616, who came to New England at a very early day with John Thorp. In 1641, with others, he bought from Jonathan Brewster, son of Elder Brewster, a ferry and 100 acres of land at Marshfield. Later he located at Duxbury, where for several years he was a surveyor. His death occurred about 1691. He married Lucy Williams, who died March 7, 1681 or 1682.

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

Muster Roll of Captain Nathan Barker’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain Nathan Barker’s Company of Light Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the sixth day of March, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Augusta Maine, to the twenty-sixth day of March, 1839, when discharged or mustered. Captain Nathan Barker. Lieutenant Ephriam Harmon. Ensign John S. Willson. Sergeants Simon A. Dyer. Benjamin Boothby. Lothrop Worcester. William Proctor. Corporals James W. Stevens. Stephen Swett. S. V. R. G. Brown. Henry Towle. Musicians Thomas Pennell. William Pike. Privates Babb, Joseph H. Bacon, Samuel F. Bailey, John H. Bangs, Samuel S. Barbour, Seward P. Bean, George T. Bond, John. Bragdon, Nathaniel. Bragdon, Seth L. Buckman, Samuel. Bullard, Asa. Chandler, Charles F. Chirk, John M. Coffin, Isiah. Davice, John C.1 Donnell, Francis. Duran, Benjamin. Dyer, Alfred. Dyer. George W. Emery, Joshua t. Fernald, Saumel R. Field, Amos, Jr. Frye, John. Garland, John. Gower, Henry E. Green, Charles M. Hale, Joseph W. Harmon, Albert. Harris. George. Hasty, James M. Haynes, James M. Hutchinson, Mark. Leathers, William W. Libby, Benjamin F. Longley, David M. Mead, Jason. Merrill, Curtis B. Merrill, Daniel. Merrill, John. Merrill, Rufus N. Morris, William E. Newcomb, Lowell. Paine, Brian. Patterson, James. Pike, George W. Purinton, Joseph C. Richards, Francis. Rolf, David F. Rounds, George. Sands, Isaac. Sawyer, Ethan A. Sawyer, Francis O. Shaw. Iselson. Smith, Amos. Strout, David P. Swett, Alfred. Tuckerman, John. Winslow, Oliver. Whitten, Joseph. Whitney, Levi, Jr.FootnotesOn pay roll as John C....

History of Cayuga County New York

This history of Cayuga County New York published in 1879, provides a look at the first 80 years of existence for this county, with numerous chapters devoted to it’s early history. One value of this manuscript may be found in the etched engravings found throughout of idyllic scenes of Cayuga County including portraits of men, houses, buildings, farms, and scenery. Included are 90 biographies of early settlers, and histories of the individual townships along with lists of men involved in the Union Army during the Civil War on a regiment by regiment basis.

Cemetery Hill

Cemetery Hill as it is known to us here, being in London, Ky. was a hill on which a Civil War battle was fought. The trenches are still here. The hill was given to the north to bury their dead by Jarvis Jackson, a great grand father of the Jarvis Jackson who is now city police of London, today. By some reason, the soldiers were taken up and moved to a different place only a few years ago. Mrs. Hoage says “the first daisies that were brought to this contry were put on that hill” and she can remember when the entire hill was covered with them. The southern side had trenches on the east side of the Dixie Highway on and surrounding the site where the Pennington Hospital is now standing, which are very vivid today. The London City School being in the path bears a hole today from a cannon ball. Shot no doubt from the Southern forces. The new addition to the school hides the hole, but until recent years it could be seen being about ten inches in diameter. Zollie Coffer a southern general had camped at Wild Cat, Ky. but was forced to retreat when general Garrad and Lucas and Stratton two captains under him, all from Clay county, with a large crowd came in. He, on his retreat came through London and had a battle with an army of Ohioians camped on Cemetery Hill. Quoted a poem by Mrs. Hodge, which she remembered from those days: “Just raise your eyes to yon grassy hill, View the bold Ohioians working with skill, Their bombs...

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