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Peace Attempts with Western Prairie Indians, 1833

What was known as the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was entered into in Mississippi with the Choctaw Indians September 27, 1830;1 pursuant to the terms of the treaty, in 1832 the movement of the Choctaw to their new home between the Canadian and Red rivers was under way but they were in danger from incursions of the Comanche and Pani Picts2 or Wichita, and the Kiowa tribe, who came east as far as the Washita and Blue rivers; these Indians had also evinced a hostile attitude toward white citizens and had attacked and plundered Santa Fe traders, trappers, and other unprotected travelers. A party of twelve traders had left Santa Fe in December, 1832, under Judge Carr of Saint Louis for their homes in Missouri. Their baggage and about ten thousand dollars in specie were packed upon mules. They were descending the Canadian River when, near the present town of Lathrop in the Panhandle of Texas, they were attacked by an overwhelming force of Comanche and Kiowa Indians. Two of the men, one named Pratt, and the other Mitchell, were killed; and after a siege of thirty-six hours the survivors made their escape at night on foot, leaving all their property in possession of the Indians. The party became separated and after incredible hardship and suffering five of them made their way to the Creek settlements on the Arkansas and to Fort Gibson where they found succor. Of the other five only two survived. The money secured by the Indians was the first they had ever seen.3 Colonel Arbuckle on May 6, ordered4 a military force to Red...

Captain McGehee, G. M. D. No. 673, Harrisonville District

Captain McGehee, G. M. D. No. 673, Harrisonville District Allen, James A. Allen, John A. Allen, Matthew Arnold, John Bailey, Jeremiah Bailey, Joseph Bailey, William Baley, James W. Barnes, Micajah R. Beck, Jacob Bird, John Black, Joseph Brooks, Biving Brooks, Julius H. Brown, Robert W. Bruster, Sheriff Bryant, Ransom R. Butt, Frederick A. Cardin, Jesse Cardwell, James Cardwell, John Cawsey, Absalom Cawsey, William Chapman, Berry Clark, John Cobb, Samuel B. Coney, William Cook, Philip Cox, Thomas W. Dewberry, Giles Dewberry, John Duke, John M. Duke, Thomas Duncan, Nathaniel Edwards, Asa Evans, William G. Ford, Bartholomew Ford, Jesse Freel, Howell Fuller, David Furgerson, William Galding, Robert Germany, Augustus B. Germany, John P. Glenn, James, Esq. Goode, James S. Goode, Mackarness Gray, Thomas Greer, Henry Grice, Larry Hallsey, Benjamin L. Harrist, Archibald M. Harrist, Daniel Harrist, John Harrist, Thomas M. Hewston, James Hightower, Arnold Holderfield, John Holsey, Benjamin W. Holt, Thomas S. Horn, Joshua Howell, Philip Hutchins, Littleberry Jennings, Coleman Jennings, James R. Jennings, John Johnson, James F. Johnson, Sankey T. Johnston, Isham Johnston, James Johnston, Lindsey Johnston, Posey Johnston, Samuel A. Jones, Jefferson Justice, William Leath, William C. Lee, Athanatius Looser, John C. Loran, John Lyons, Robert Matthews, Frederick McGehee, William McKnight, William McLain, James Meacham, John Menefee, William Miller, Homer P. M. Mitcham, Hezekiah Mitcham, James Morton, Duke O’Kelly, Stephen O’Neal, Bryan Owen, Jeremiah Pane, Joseph Patterson, John, Sr. Peavy, Hiram P. Peavy, James Peavy, James (2) Peavy, James E. Phillips, Hardy Phillips, Henry J. B. Phillips, James T. Poe, William Pugh, John Reason, Richard A. Richardson, Jacob Richardson, Lucian H. Richardson, Moses Saint John, Thomas B. Scroggins, Sanders...

Washington Irving at Fort Gibson, 1832

The McIntosh Creeks had been located along Arkansas River near the Verdigris on fertile timbered land which they began at once to clear, cultivate, and transform into productive farms. The treaty of 1828 with the Cherokee gave the latter a great tract of land on both sides of Arkansas River embracing that on which the Creeks were located. This was accomplished by a blunder of the Government officials, in the language of the Secretary of War,1 “when we had not a correct knowledge of the location of the Creek Indians nor of the features of the country.” This situation produced much unhappiness and contention between the people of the two tribes. The Indians had other grievances, and the Creeks took the lead in calling the attention of the officials to their needs by the preparation of a memorial in which they complained of frequent attacks upon them by bands of wild Indians from the south and west of their location. They asked the Government to appoint a commission to meet with them for the redress of their wrongs, and to call a council of the different tribes for the adoption of measures to establish peace and security in their new home. The Creek memorial and a long report by the Secretary of War on February 16, 1832, were transmitted to Congress by President Jackson,2 who recommended that three commissioners be appointed as requested in the memorial, and recommended by the Secretary. It appeared from the report of the Secretary of War that there were then west of the Mississippi twenty-five hundred Creeks, six thousand Choctaw, thirty-five hundred Cherokee and...

Establishment of Fort Gibson in 1824

By Act of Congress of March 2, 1819, Arkansas Territory was established July 4, embracing substantially all of what are now the states of Arkansas and Oklahoma; though the civil government of Arkansas Territory was limited to that section lying east of the Osage line, divided into counties, and embracing approximately the present state of Arkansas. That west of the Osage line was the Indian country, and in later years became known as Indian Territory. James Miller1 of New Hampshire was appointed the first Governor of Arkansas Territory, and among the duties of his office was that of supervision of the Indians within his jurisdiction. After the battle at Clermont’s Town an effort was made to induce the warring tribes to enter into a treaty of peace. This was accomplished in October 1818,2 in Saint Louis, in the presence of William Clark, the Governor of Missouri Territory. Directly after Governor Miller assumed his duties as executive, he was required to intervene between the Osage and Cherokee in an effort to prevent imminent hostilities growing out of the killing of a number of Cherokee hunters by a band of Osage under Mad Buffalo. In April 1820, Governor Miller departed from the seat of government at Arkansas Post, on his mission to the Cherokee and Osage. He was gone two months, and prevented temporarily at least – the threatened renewal of warfare by the Cherokee. He went first to the Cherokee settlements, where he sought to dissuade the members of that tribe from further hostilities by his promise that he would endeavor to secure from the Osage the murderers of their...

Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In the table below you can find the name of those whom biographies can be found and click on the page number – it will take you directly to their biography. If you wish to access the history portion of the manuscript then it is contained in volumes 1-2, volume 3 being devoted entirely to biographies. Gallery of Western Nebraska’s People 143 full page photographs of families, couples, group photographs, individual people, and homesteads found within the manuscript History of Western Nebraska & It’s People, Volume 3. Volume 1 – History of Western Nebraska Volume 2 – History of Western Nebraska Biographies of Western Nebraska – Volume 3 SurnameGivePageNotes BusheeBerton Kenyon5 GentryBenjamin F.6 DownerAmon R.7 KirkhamValle B.7 LammWilliam H.8 NeeleyRobert G.8 HamptonRodolphus M.9 HardingWilliam Henry11 WesterveltJames P.11 GrimmJoseph L.12 McHenryMatthew H.12 RaymondLewis L.13 LymanWilliam H.14 SimmonsRobert G.14 DenslowLloyd15 PeckhamJohn S.16 PeckhamGeorge B.16 AndersonVictor17M.D. FrenchWilliam F.17 DavisEvan G.18 HanksRobert M.18 LammWilliam19Sr. ProhsOtto J.19 JonesHoward O.20D.D.S. MillerRobert G.20 AtkinsAuburn W.21 BrownWilliam G.22D.D.S. IrelandTed L.22 HamiltonLuther F.23 YoungFrank B.23M. D. ScottFremont24 MaginnisPatrick25 FaughtArthur M.27M....

Contributions of the Old Residents’ Historical Association, Lowell MA

The Lowell Historical Society of Lowell Massachusetts published 6 volumes of “contributions” to the recording of the history of Lowell Massachusetts at the turn of the century. These contributions were continued by the contributions by the Lowell Historical Society. Volume I A Fragment, written in 1843, by Theodore Edson Boott, Kirk, by Theodore Edson Carpet-Weaving and the Lowell Manufacturing Company, by Samuel Fay Dana, Samuel L., Memoir of, by John O. Green Early Recollections of an Old Resident, by Josiah B. French East Chelmsford (now Lowell), Families Living in, in 1802, by Z. E. Stone Green, Benjamin, Biography of, by Lewis Green Hale, Moses, Early Manufacturer of Wool, &c., in E. Chelmsford, by Alfred Gilman History of an Old Firm, by Charles Hovey Jackson, General, in Lowell, by Z. E. Stone Jackson, Patrick T., by John A. Lowell Knapp, Daniel, Autobiography of Letters (Three) of Samuel Batchelder First Census of Lowell; the Hamilton Manufacturing Company; first Manufacture of the Power-Loom Drilling Letters (Three) of Samuel Lawrence John Brown; Milton D. Whipple; the Purchase of the Outlets of the N. H. Lakes, the sources of the Merrimack Lewis, Joel, Reminiscences of, by Joshua Merrill Livingston, William, by Josiah B. French Locke, Joseph, Life and Character of, by John A. Knowles Lowell and Harvard College, by John O. Green Contains a list of alumni and graduates of Harvard University, now or formerly residing in Lowell. July 1877. Lowell and the Monadnocks, by Ephraim Brown Lowell and Newburyport, by Thomas B. Lawson Lowell, Francis Cabot, by Alfred Gilman Lowell Institution for Savings, Semi-Centennial History of, by Geo. J. Carney Lowell, Mayors of...

Howard Family of Brockton Massachusetts

This article is to treat particularly of the John Haward/Howard branch of the family to which belonged the late Daniel S. Howard, who was one of Brockton’s foremost citizens and most successful shoe manufacturers; his brother, Gorham B. Howard, now retired, who for a number of years was one of that city’s successful merchants, engaged in the dry goods business; and the former’s sons, Warren A. Howard, now deceased, who for years was extensively engaged in the manufacture of shoes, and Daniel S. Howard, Jr., who is president of the Emerson Shoe Company, of Rockland, Massachusetts.

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa together with sketches of their cities, villages and townships, educational, civil, military and political history; portraits of prominent persons, and 641 biographies of representative citizens. Also included is a history of Iowa embracing accounts of the pre-historic races, and a brief review of its civil and military history.

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

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