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Disbursements to Cherokees under the Treaty of May 6, 1828

Abstract of disbursements and expenditures made by George Vashon, Indian Agent for the Cherokees west of the Mississippi, under the stipulations of the Treaty with said tribe of 6th May, 1828, between the 16th September, 1830, and the 31st December, 1833. In total this list represents 390 Cherokee families and 1835 individuals who each received 25.75 as part of their payment under the 5th article of the treaty of 6th May, 1828.

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

Early Incidents in the Mississippi Territory

Napoleon Bonaparte had turned his eagle eye to the rich province of Louisiana, and it was ceded by Spain to France. He contemplated its occupation, with a large army, and probably entertained designs of conquest against portions of the United States; but, becoming deeply involved in wars with the whole of Europe, he reluctantly relinquished these intentions, and ceded Louisiana to the United States for sixty millions of francs. Governor Claiborne, with a large number of emigrants, who had already flocked to Natchez from all parts of the Union for the purpose of occupying Louisiana, sailed down the Mississippi, with Wilkinson and his forces, and took formal possession of the city of New Orleans, in behalf of the United States. He had been appointed the Governor of the Louisiana Territory. He left the people of the Mississippi Territory duly impressed with a deep sense of obligation for his valuable public services. Cato West, the Territorial Secretary, discharged the executive duties until his successor arrived. The distance of Natchez from the Tombigby was so great that Congress authorized the President to appoint an additional Superior Court Judge for the benefit of the people settled upon that river. The Hon. Harry Toulmin was selected. He was born at Taunton, in England, the 7th April 1766, and descended from a learned and respectable family. He became a pastor of the Unitarian church, at Chowbert, in Lancashire, in 1788, where he occupied a prominent position, officiating before a congregation of a thousand hearers. Becoming an object of suspicion to the government, it determined to silence not only his efforts, but those of every...

Hardships of the Early Natchez Emigrants

Taking the reader with us, to the settlements of the distant Natchez region, he will find that emigrants continued to pour in, upon those fertile hills and alluvial bottoms, from all parts of “his majesty’s Atlantic plantations.” Many were the hardships and perils they encountered, in reaching this remote and comparatively uninhabited region. It is believed that the history of one party of these emigrants will enable the reader to understand what kind of hardships and deprivations all the others were forced to undergo. Major General Phineas Lyman, a native of Durham, a graduate of Yale, a distinguished lawyer, and a member of the legislature of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, became commander of the Connecticut forces in 1755. He served with so much distinction, during the Canadian war, that he was invited, by persons high in office, to visit England. He had formed an association composed of his brothers in arms, called the “Military Adventurers,” whose design was, the colonization of a tract of country upon the Mississippi. He sailed to England, as agent for this company, with the sanguine, yet reasonable hope, that the King would make the grant. Arriving there he found, to his astonishment, that land in a wilderness was refused to those who had fought so valiantly for it, and whose contemplated establishment would have formed a barrier against enemies, who might seek to acquire it. In his own country Lyman had never solicited favor, otherwise than by faithful public services. The coolness which he now experienced deeply mortified him — his spirits sank, and he lost all his former energy. Shocked at the degradation...

Flowers, Dewey – Obituary

Baker City, Baker County, Oregon Dewey Flowers, 66, of Star, Idaho, a former Baker City resident, died June 25, 2005, at Boise after an extended illness. His funeral will be at 10 a.m. Friday at the First Christian Church in La Grande. His graveside service will be immediately afterward at Mount Hope Cemetery in Baker City. Visitations will be from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday at Loveland Funeral Chapel in La Grande. Dewey was born at Baker City on Sept. 29, 1938, to Ardes I. Regan Flowers and Dewey G. Flowers. While attending Baker schools, he achieve the rank of Eagle Scout. He attended the national Eagle Scout convention at Irvine, Calif., in 1953. Dewey was the first drum major for the Baker Elks Drum and Bugle Corps, which he held dear to his heart. He gave many years as a leader, taking many kids through their memorable years to state and national Elks conventions. He was a 43-year member of the Baker Elks Lodge. He attended Eastern Oregon University at La Grande from 1957 to 1959. He married Mardene Estes in December of 1959. He worked for the U.S. Forest Service for 37 years, retiring in 1994. Dewey married Janice Conklin in August of 1997 and later relocated by himself to Star, Idaho. He enjoyed hunting, fishing and his cabin he shared with his son, Don, at New Bridge. His love was his children, grandchildren and family. He will be deeply missed by his family and friends. Survivors include his three children and their spouses, Don and Brenda Flowers of La Grande, Jani and Duane McLaughlin of...

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