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History of the Methodist Church at Norwich Vermont

Prior to the year 1800, Methodism had scarcely gained a foothold in Vermont. The first Methodist society in the State is said to have been formed at Vershire by Nicholas Suethen in 1796. Two years later, only one hundred church members were returned as residents in the Vershire Circuit, then including the whole of eastern Vermont. Zadock Thompson, in the first edition of his Gazetteer of Vermont, published in 1824, gives the number of preachers, traveling and local, at that time as about one hundred, and the number of societies much greater. Probably no religious body ever made so rapid a growth in the state or the country as did the Methodists during the first twenty-five years of the nineteenth century. Although largely outnumbering every other at the present time, its later rate of increase is comparatively slow. We have no information that fixes the time at which Methodist meetings began to be held in Norwich. The earliest preaching was by circuit preachers, and of these Eleazer Wells and Nathaniel Stearns were among the first. Both of these men had the certificates of their ordination to the ministry (as early as 1810 or 1811) by Bishop McKendree entered upon the town records, and both doubtless labored here more or less about that time. Rev. Amasa Taylor was also here some part of the time about 1813. About 1815, the first church building was erected by the Methodists, a wooden structure of modest dimensions, which stood near the forks of the highway leading from Union Village to Norwich Plain, and about two miles south of the former place. Some members...

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George A. Godsmark, George Wigent, Daniel Place, John J. DeWitt, Jay Henderson, William H. Barr, Josephus Sanborn, John C. Thomas, Michael Hamill, William Mitchell, Henry Thrall, William Motter, George Upright, Thomas J. Hitchcock, Asa Goodrich, Charles Albright, George Hoag, David Wise,...

Biography of George West Flanders

George West Flanders, who lives on a small farm in West Concord, was born there, November 9, 1831. The great-grandfather was an extensive land-owner at Millville, and had possession of the water-power privilege of that section. His residence stood on the site now occupied by St. Paul’s School. At the close of his active life he left his land to be divided among his sons. His wife’s maiden name was Fowler. The grandfather, Richard Flanders, was engaged in interests connected with a mill. Afterward he purchased a farm in the west part of the town, and became a farmer. At first he had no barns on the land, and he stacked his crops in the open air. Later he was able to build a barn, and extend his property, which his sons further increased. He was ninety years old when he died. His wife, Mary Chandler (West) Flanders, had ten children. A brother of his was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. John Flanders, the father of George, worked at the shoemaker’s trade, and was also occupied to some extent in farming. He was especially skilful in raising fruit and grafting trees. After receiving his education in the public schools of Concord, he began life about a century ago upon the property now in possession of his son George. Here he built the old homestead, and died in 1856, at the age of seventy years. On the training days of the old militia he was fife major of a regiment. His sons subsequently played the fife on similar occasions. He married Rachel Abbott, a daughter of Samuel and Mary...

Biography of Jacob N. Flanders

Jacob N. Flanders, an influential citizen of West Concord, N.H., was born on the estate which is now his home, March 25, 1825, son of Jacob and Huldah (Abbott) Flanders. His great-grandfather, Richard Flanders, was a large landed proprietor of Millville and owner of all the Concord in the latter part of his life, and divided his land among his sons. His wife was a Fowler. Richard’s son, Richard, Jr., was a mill hand and a farmer, and helped in clearing the land now owned by his grandson. The first crops had to be stacked in the open air without shelter; but later on he built a barn, and his sons afterward added to it. He lived to be ninety years old. His brother was one of the patriot soldiers who fought for freedom in the Revolutionary War. Richard Flanders, Jr., married Mary Chandler West, and they had ten children. Their son, Jacob, father of Jacob N., was educated in the old district school located near the pond; and after he left school he began farming. His life of fifty-one years was spent at the family homestead. He was a fife major in the old State militia. He was musical, had a fine strong voice, and taught singing-school here for several years. His wife, Huldah, was a daughter of Samuel and Mary Story Abbott, of Hopkinton, N.H. She became the mother of five children; namely, Richard M., Lucy Ann, Jacob N., Samuel A., and William H. Jacob N. is the only one of these children now living. He passed his boyhood and youth on his father’s farm, and, like...

Biography of Sullivan Flanders

Sullivan Flanders, a farmer of Hopkinton, was born in Bradford, N.H., October 6, 1822, son of Nathaniel and Betsey (Wright) Flanders. His grandfather, Jeremiah, came here from South Hampton some time between 1780 and 1783, and managed for one McCard large tracts of land covering several miles in the west part of Hopkinton. In 1794 Jeremiah purchased and settled on land where Thomas White now lives. He married Miriam George; and they had a family of nine children, seven sons and two daughters. His death occurred in Hopkinton, June 14, 1845, and that of his wife, April 14, 1856. Nathaniel Flanders in early life was a shoemaker. Later on he took up farming, buying in 1841 the present farm of the Copps family. This place was called the Straw farm; and the house was erected by the proprietor bearing that name, who also planted the large elm in front. Captain Aaron Adams, who belonged to the Massachusetts Adamses, was the first owner of the place, having bought it of the “Lords Proprietors,” as the deed says. Here Nathaniel died February 14, 1890; and his wife died February 16, 1869. Their children, six in number, were: Melissa, Sullivan, Lydia W., Joshua W., Nathaniel, and George. Melissa married Rufus P. Copps, of Hopkinton; Lydia W. married John Holbrook, of Swanzey, N.H., and died in 1891; Joshua W. married Ophelia Paige, of Weare, where they reside; Nathaniel, who did not marry, lives with Sullivan; George was killed by a falling tree at the age of thirty. Sullivan Flanders undertook the management of the farm when quite a young man, and with the...

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