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Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the world, have pursued “the even tenor of their way,” content to have it said of them, as Christ said of the woman performing a deed of mercy – “They have done what they could.” It tells how that many in the pride and strength of young manhood left the plow and the anvil, the lawyer’s office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country’s call went forth valiantly “to do or die,” and how through their efforts the Union was restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. Genealogists will appreciate this volume from the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which would otherwise be inaccessible. Great...

Bethany Baptist Church Cemetery Graham Indiana

This is an historical transcription of Bethany Baptist Church Cemetery, Graham, Jefferson County, Indiana which was transcribed in 1941 as part of the DAR cemetery transcription project. The value of this transcription is that in many cases they transcribed headstones which may today no longer exist. Had it not been for this project these records may have been lost due to the natural regression of cemeteries. Many of the cemeteries may be known by a different name today, we use the name they were identified as in 1941. Arbuckle, J. N., 07 Aug 1837 – 10 Dec 1882 Boyd, Robert H., 09 May 1830 – 22 June 1917, Co. B. 10th Iowa Regiment Cain, John, 23 Aug 1868 – 15 Apr 1892 Cain, Melissa J., w/o John Cain, 12 Mar 1813 – 07 Aug 1867 Cain, Martha, w/o John Cain, 20 Jun 1838 – 17 Jan 1893 Cain, Emma, 1867 – 1927 Cain, Marcellus, 22 Sep 1842 – 25 Mar 1878 Chambers, Rose N., d/o of Chas & Nancy Chambers, 25 Sep 1864 – 08 Jun 1886 Chambers, Nancy, 25 Jun 1819 – 24 Jan 1891 Chambers, James B., 07 May 1822 – 24 Dec 1893 Chambers, Melita, w/o Alex Chambers, d. 04 Feb 1878, age 47 years Chambers, Avery, consort of Rhoda Chambers, d. 08 Mar 1865, age 67 years Chambers, Rhoda, w/o Avery Chambers, d. 21 Aug 1875, age 75 years Chasteen, inf. Son of Chasteen, 1863 Chasteen, James, 07 Aug 1818 – 07 Jun 1889 Chasteen, Elizabeth, 1820 – 1902 Chasteen, Ephraim, 25 Nov 1847 – 01 Sep 1927 Chasteen, Christenia, w/o E. Chasteen, 28 Mar...

Early Incidents in the Mississippi Territory

Napoleon Bonaparte had turned his eagle eye to the rich province of Louisiana, and it was ceded by Spain to France. He contemplated its occupation, with a large army, and probably entertained designs of conquest against portions of the United States; but, becoming deeply involved in wars with the whole of Europe, he reluctantly relinquished these intentions, and ceded Louisiana to the United States for sixty millions of francs. Governor Claiborne, with a large number of emigrants, who had already flocked to Natchez from all parts of the Union for the purpose of occupying Louisiana, sailed down the Mississippi, with Wilkinson and his forces, and took formal possession of the city of New Orleans, in behalf of the United States. He had been appointed the Governor of the Louisiana Territory. He left the people of the Mississippi Territory duly impressed with a deep sense of obligation for his valuable public services. Cato West, the Territorial Secretary, discharged the executive duties until his successor arrived. The distance of Natchez from the Tombigby was so great that Congress authorized the President to appoint an additional Superior Court Judge for the benefit of the people settled upon that river. The Hon. Harry Toulmin was selected. He was born at Taunton, in England, the 7th April 1766, and descended from a learned and respectable family. He became a pastor of the Unitarian church, at Chowbert, in Lancashire, in 1788, where he occupied a prominent position, officiating before a congregation of a thousand hearers. Becoming an object of suspicion to the government, it determined to silence not only his efforts, but those of every...

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George A. Godsmark, George Wigent, Daniel Place, John J. DeWitt, Jay Henderson, William H. Barr, Josephus Sanborn, John C. Thomas, Michael Hamill, William Mitchell, Henry Thrall, William Motter, George Upright, Thomas J. Hitchcock, Asa Goodrich, Charles Albright, George Hoag, David Wise,...

Fanny Taylor, Mrs. Thomas Harding Ellis

The loveliness of Virginia women has been a theme of song and verse. Among the Richmond belles of sixty years ago none were more justly celebrated than that trio known as the Richmond Graces, Sally Chevalier, Fanny Taylor, and Sally Watson. Close companions from early childhood, their unusual beauty as they grew to womanhood brought them fame individually and collectively. Sally Chevalier became the wife of Abram Warwick, Sally Watson, of Alexander Rives, and Fanny Taylor, of whom this sketch is designed to treat at greater length, was twice married. She was educated at the excellent school of Miss Jane Mackenzie, in Richmond, at a time when a young lady’s education embraced a rather superficial dip into the languages, a good deal of poetry, some history, a neat Italian handwriting, and a care of their peach-blossom complexions and slender hands. Frivolous as it sounds compared with the curriculum of girls’ schools in good standing at this end of the century, the history of the South furnishes many evidences of the profundity as well as the brilliancy of its women. With her friends, Sally Chevalier and Sally Watson, Fanny Taylor was a pupil in the dancing academies of Mr. Xaupi and Mr. Boisseau. They excelled in the grace and beauty of their dancing, and at the Assembly balls it was their custom to occupy places in the same cotillon. They enjoyed the delicate celebrity of having pieces of dancing-music named after them, and when “Sally Chevalier,” “Fanny Taylor,” or “Sally Watson,” was called for, Judah, Ruffin, and Lomax, those dusky magnates of the ballroom, brought forth the melody with an...

Biography of Rewell J. Ellis

Rewell J. Ellis, a well-known Grand Army man and a prominent farmer of Cornish, was born at Brandon, Vt., September 5, 1840, son of Seneca and Aurilla (Bagley) Ellis. His grandfather was John Ellis, who married Margaret Holt, and was the father of Seneca and William Ellis. William, who was born at Shoreham, Vt., went West a number of years ago, and has not since been heard from. The family do not know whether he is living or not. Seneca Ellis was born at sea, July 26, 1809. He was educated in the schools at Brandon, Vt., and subsequently followed the occupation of farmer in Vermont and New Hampshire. The last thirty years of his life were spent in Cornish. In August, 1862, he enlisted in the Sixteenth New Hampshire Regiment, and afterward was in action at New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and in Florida. Although his term of enlistment was but nine months, he remained in the service for nearly a year. He August, 1863, suffering from a mortal illness contracted in the war. The desire of seeing home faces appears to have kept him alive until it was gratified. He died a few days later, having given his life for his country as surely as if he had been shot down on the battlefield. His wife was Aurilla, daughter of Curtis and Phylinda (Downing) Bagley; and their eleven children were: William H., Julia, Annie M., Joel C., Newell J., Jason, George, Orrilla N., Louisa J., Frank P., and Emmeline. William H., a native of Brandon, born in January, 1832, married Harriet Ellison, of Rockingham, Vt., and resides in...

Biographical Sketch of Benjamin Ellis

Benjamin Ellis settled on South Bear creek in 1815. He was a wheelwright and chair maker, and also had a hand-mill. He had ten children. James Ellis settled on Bear creek in 1819. He married Elizabeth Bowen, and they had six children Edmund, Benjamin, Leeper, William, Fanny, and Martha. Benjamin married Catharine McGarvin, and now lives in Callaway...

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Thomas J. Ellis

(See Adair and Grant)-Mary May, daughter of Robert Taylor and Sue Krebs (McCoy) Morrison born April 12, 1884 in Sequoyah District. Educated in the Cherokee National Schools. Married in Bartlesville Jan. 28, 1901 Thomas Jefferson, son of Thomas Jefferson and V. Elks, born Dec. 16, 1881 in Sedan, Chautauqua County, Kansas. They are the parents of Gladys, born May 10, 1905; Evelyn, born June 23, 1907 and Judson Ellis, born Oct. 29, 1909. Thomas Jefferson Ellis is a member of the Masonic fraternity and is one of the substantial cattlemen and bankers of Washington County. One of the leading democrats of Washington County, he was appointed as the first county assessor in 1911 and elected to the same office in 1912. Ellen, daughter of Andrew and Mary (Miller) Adair married Richard Martin, son of Alexander and Sarah Elizabeth (Hicks) McCoy and they were the parents of Mrs. Sue Krebs (McCoy)...

Slave Narrative of Elsie Pryor

The first Mistis I remember was named Mary Ellis, she was part Choctaw Indian. I don’t remember ole Marster at all. When ole Miss’s daughter got married, ole Miss give her a little nigger girl. That was me an’ when I was a little thing, too. I don’t remember who young Miss married. They didn’t tell little niggers nothin’, we just found out what we could and din’t pay much tention to that. An’ not much ‘tention to what we saw. We was jes like little varmints. They’d cut arm holes and head holes in croker sacks and tell us to put them on and go along to work and we did, too. That was the only garment we would wear. We’d go ‘long totin’ in chips, and wood and just anything they had for us to do. I was sold so many times I hardly knew who my marster and mistis were. First good price come ‘long, away I’d go. They said I was nine years old when the niggers were freed. I din’t know ’cause I couldn’t read nor spell nor nothing. I only knew what they told me and they didn’t tell us little niggers much, and they’d give us a whack up the side of the head if we asked too many questions. The first dress I remember having besides croker sacks, was cotton homespun. They gave us dresses for Christmas. It was plain white. Later we got striped ones. They made our dresses for Christmas. They didn’t waste any sheep wool on us little niggers. We done well to get cotton ones. What they...
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