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Muster Roll of Captain John D. Barnard’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain John D. Barnard’s Company of Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the sixth day of March, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Augusta, Maine, to the twenty-eighth day of March, 1839, when discharged or mustered.

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Biography of James S. Elkins

James S. Elkins, a prominent citizen of Canterbury, N.H., was born in Rye, N.H., December 24, 1809, son of James and Mehitable (Rand) Elkins. His paternal grandfather, Samuel Elkins, was a native of Rye, where he was engaged in agriculture during the active period of his life. James Elkins was a farmer and fisherman, following the first-named occupation in Rye, where he was born May 3, 1777. He died in Canterbury, November 29, 1855. His wife, Mehitable Rand Elkins, was born in Rye, June 19, 1787, and died in Canterbury, July 20, 1859. James S., the subject of this sketch; David, born November 4, 1812, and now deceased; and Moses, born February 21, 1814, who died September 20, 1889. James S. Elkins received his education in the public schools of his native town. He remained at home, and helped on the farm until he was twenty years of age. His parents removed to Little Boar’s Head and then to Stratham, N.H., remaining four years in each place. In 1834 they moved to Canterbury. He was engaged in stone-cutting in Quincy, Gloucester, and Boston, where he helped build the First Merchants’ Exchange. In 1834 he bought a farm near the village of Canterbury. About 1873 he purchased the property where he now resides, and where for the last twenty years he has lived retired from business. In politics Mr. Elkins has always been a strong Democrat and an active politician. He served three years as Selectman, and was the Representative of his district two years, besides holding other minor offices. He has been twice married. His first wife was Abbie...

Slave Narrative of Alice Douglass

Person Interviewed: Alice Douglass Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Sumner County, Tennessee Date of Birth: December 22, 1860 Age: 73 I was born December 22, 1880 in Summer County, Tennessee. My mother, I mean mammy, ’cause what did we know ’bout mother and mama. Master and Mistress made dey chillun call all nigger women. “Black Harmy.” Jest as I was saying my mammy was named Millie Elkins and my pappy was named Isaac Garrett. My sisters and brothers was Frank, Susie and Mollie. They is all in Nashville, Tennessee right now. They lived in log houses. I ‘member my grandpappy and when he died. I allus slept in the Big House in a cradle wid white babies. We all the time wore cotton dresses and we weaved our own cloth. The boys jest wore shirts. Some wore shoes, and I sho’ did. I kin see ’em now as they measured my feets to git my shoes. We had doctors to wait on us iffen we got sick and ailing. We wore asafedida to keep all diseases offen us. When a nigger man got ready to marry, he go and tell his master that they was a woman on sech and sech a farm that he’d lak to have. Iffen master give his resent, then he go and ask her master and iffen he say yes, well, they jest jump the broomstick. Hens could jest see their wives on Sadday nite. They laid peoples ‘cross barrels and whupped ’em wid bull whups till the blood come. They’d half feed ’em and niggers’d steal food and cook all night....

Biography of Dr. C. B. Elkins

DR. C. B. ELKINS. The noble profession of medicine affords to the student in that science a never-ending source of investigation and experiment. New remedies are constantly being discovered, steady progress is being made in surgery and new diseases are presenting themselves under varying forms of civilization. In the noble army of workers in this great field may be found the name of Dr. C. B. Elkins, who, since 1888, has resided in Ozark, Christian County, Missouri. He came from Cannon County, Tennessee, in 1870, and with his father settled in Christian County about three miles from Ozark. There his father, H. R. Elkins, still resides. Dr. Elkins owes his nativity to Tennessee; in which State his birth occurred in 1862. His mother, Ruth Neely, was also born in that State and was a daughter of Alexander Neely. The Elkins family have been known in America ever since colonial days and have been residents of Tennessee from the very early history of that State. When Dr. Elkins was five years old he was left motherless with a brother and sister. The former, Euclid Elkins, became a man of family and died in Ozark County, Missouri, in 1881, and the latter, Melissa, became the wife of W. L. Phillips of Christian County. After the death of the wife and mother, the father married again and by his second wife became the father of two sons, James T. and William B. James T. is with the Johnson Witty Drug Company, and William B. is with J. L. Lee Tie and Timber Company, Sparta, Missouri The Doctor first attended the district schools...

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