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Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the world, have pursued “the even tenor of their way,” content to have it said of them, as Christ said of the woman performing a deed of mercy – “They have done what they could.” It tells how that many in the pride and strength of young manhood left the plow and the anvil, the lawyer’s office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country’s call went forth valiantly “to do or die,” and how through their efforts the Union was restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. Genealogists will appreciate this volume from the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which would otherwise be inaccessible. Great...

War With The Modoc – Indian Wars

Early April 16th, the Modoc had a big fire in their camp. Major Thomas dropped a shell directly into it, provoking a frantic war whoop, and causing the sudden extinguishing of the fire. Another shell was dropped in the same locality, and was followed by yells of pain and dismay. The Modoc then appeared and challenged the soldiers to come out and fight. Another shell was the answer, and they were driven back. At 4 o’clock A. M. , after another fight, the Modoc gave up the attempt to break through the line and retired. Scattering shots were fired on the men who attempted to advance on them. At 9 o’clock Gen. Gillem‘s command moved forward from the position gained on Tuesday, and soon occupied the ledge next to Jack’s camp. Col. Mason moved the right forward as rapidly as possible to form a junction with Gen. Gillem‘s left, cutting off the Modoc from the lake, their only source of water supply. The junction was affected at noon. At 2 p. m. the mortars were throwing shells within excellent range. Col Greene fell back behind the ledge, awaiting the Modoc, should the shells drive them out. After the firing the Modoc replied with yells. After the fifth shell there came a raking fire and a small party of men sprang out of the chasm and came into the lines amid a shower of bullets. The falling back was caused by the Modoc flanking and opening a crossfire. Col. Miller, attempting to form a junction with the Warm Spring Indians, missed them as he swung down into the great chasm with thirteen men, whereupon Miller...

Biography of James F. Egan

JAMES F. EGAN – Possessed of brains, initiative, energy, and capacity for thorough and profound study, James F. Egan has already made a name for himself as a dependable young lawyer. He has a wide circle of acquaintances whom he has impressed with his quality, and he is constantly extending his clientele. James F. Egan, son of James and Winifred (Tighe) Egan, was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, June 20, 1896. His father, a hard-working and reliable brick mason, was born in Ireland, September 4, 1866, and his mother was born there May 3, 1868. James Egan, senior, died in 1922, after a long and useful life. James F. Egan received his early education in the public schools of Springfield, and graduated from Commercial High School with the class of 1915. With his love of study and his promising academic work, he decided on further education and secured a degree of Bachelor of Arts at Holy Cross College, graduating with the lass of 1921. From there he advanced to Harvard Law School, obtaining his degree of Bachelor of Law in 1924. That same year he was admitted to the Massachusetts bar. He began his legal career with general law practice in the office of William G. McKechnie, No. 31 Elm Street, Springfield, Massachusetts. During the World War Mr. Egan interrupted his career by offering for service, and he became an ensign in the Navy. He maintains his membership in the American Legion. He is also a member of the Hampden County Bar Association, and in politics is Democratic. Mr. Egan, a member of the Holy Family Church, is an enthusiastic...

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