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Descendants of John Paull of Taunton, MA

JOHN PAULL, for over fifty years at the head of the firm of John Paull & Co., hay and grain dealers in Taunton, was throughout that long period a business man of the highest standing, trusted by all who had relations with him. His honorable methods and upright standards were recognized by all his associates. His success evidenced his ability and placed him among the leading men of the community, although he did not identify himself particularly with its affairs outside the field of commerce. The Paull family of which John Paull was a descendant is one of the oldest and best known among the old families of Southeastern Massachusetts. The first of the name in New England, William Paull, was, according to tradition, a native of Scotland, and was a weaver by occupation. He located in Taunton, where he was an early inhabitant, where also was Richard Paull, who was supposed to have been a brother of William. William Paull married Mary Richmond, daughter of John Richmond, of Taunton. He became one of the original proprietors of what was known as “Taunton South Purchase,” which was purchased from the Indians in 1672. He was a large landowner in that territory which in 1712 was incorporated as the town of Dighton, Mass. He died, according to the inscription on tombstone, on Nov. 9, 1704, aged eighty years, while his wife Mary died Oct. 3, 1715, aged seventy-six years. Their children were: James, born April 7, 1657; John, July 10, 1660; Edward, Feb. 7, 1665; Mary, Feb. 8, 1667; Sarah, July 5, 1668; Abigail, May 15, 1673. James Paull, son...

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

Slave Narrative of Mattie Hariman

Person Interviewed: Mattie Hariman Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Gunalis, Texas Date of Birth: January 2, 1859 Age: 78 I was born January 2, 1859, at Gunalis, Texas. My father’s name was William Tensley and my mother’s name Mildred Howard. They was brought from Virginia. I did have 8 brothers and sisters but all of them are dead. My Master was name William Henry Edward. Since I was too young to work I nursed my sisters’ children while they worked. The cooking was done all up to the general kitchen at Masters house and when slaves come from work they would send their children up to the kitchen to bring their meals to their homes in the quarters. Our Mistress would have one of the cooks to dish up vegetables and she herself would slice or serve the meat to see that it wasn’t wasted, as seemingly it was thought so precious. As my mother worked ’round the Big House quite a deal I would go up to the Big House with her and play with the white children who seemed to like for me to come to play with them. One day in anger while playing I called one of the white girls. “old black dog” and they pretended they would tell their mother (my Mistress) about it. I was scared, as they saw, and they promised me they would not tell if I’d promise to not do it again, and which I was so glad to do and be let off so lightly. For summer I wore a cotton slip and for winter my mother...

Biography of Thomas Edward

Thomas Edward, Shoemaker. It is the object of this volume to set forth the lives of working men who through industry, perseverance, and high principle have raised themselves by their own exertions from humble beginnings. Raised themselves! Yes; but to what? Not merely, let us hope, to wealth and position, not merely to worldly respect and high office, but to some conspicuous field of real usefulness to their fellow men. Those whose lives we have hitherto examined did so raise themselves by their own strenuous energy and self-education. Either, like Garfield and Franklin, they served the State zealously in peace or war; or else, like Stephenson and Telford, they improved human life by their inventions and engineering works; or, again, like Herschel and Fraunhofer, they added to the wide field of scientific knowledge; or finally, like Millet and Gibson, they beautified the world with their noble and inspiring artistic productions. But in every one of these cases, the men whose lives we have been here considering did actually rise, sooner or later, from the class of labourers into some other class socially and monetarily superior to it. Though they did great good in other ways to others, they did still as a matter of fact succeed themselves in quitting the rank in which they were born, and rising to some other rank more or less completely above it. Now, it will be clear to everybody that so long as our present social arrangements exist, it must be impossible for the vast mass of labouring men ever to do anything of the sort. It is to be desired, indeed, that...

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