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Clay Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

Benjamin Clay was the son of Jonathan and Mary (Roundy) Clay, born Oct. 17, 1781; married, first, Relief Green, Feb. 20, 1803, by whom he had the following children: Rebecca, Chesley, Amanda, and Clarinda. The mother of these children died of consumption May 10, 1830, aged fifty-three years, and Mr. Clay married second Sally Clough, Feb. 24, 1831, by whom he had children: Sarah (died young), Benja and Sarah.

1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Mary F., emp. H. S. & H., h. 16 East Main View the Complete Directory Surnames in the Town of Lakeville Massachusetts You will find the directory of Lakeville Massachusetts starts on page 161. Aldrich, Allen, Anderson, Ashley, Audet, Barnes, Barney, Barton, Bassett, Bennett, Benton, Best, Boman, Briggs, Brown, Bullock, Bump, Bumpus, Burgess, Canedy, Card, Carlin, Caswell, Chace, Clark, Clarke, Cole, Collins, Coombs, Cudworth, Cushman, Davis, Dean, DeMoranville, Dexter, Drake, Dushane, Ellers, Elmer, Elwell, Farmer, Farnham, Ford, Frades, Freeman, Frost, Gerrish, Gifford, Gilman, Gilpatrick, Godfrey, Grady, Griffith, Hackett, Hafford, Hale, Hall, Hammond, Harlow, Harrington, Harvey, Haskell, Haskins, Hayes, Haynes, Hinds, Hinkley, Hoard, Hoffman, Holloway, Horr, Horton, Morton, Howland, Johnson, Jones, Keith, Kelley, Kenney, Kinsley, Lang, Leach, Leonard, Letcher, Lincoln, Loner, Luther, Macomber, Mann, Manning, Marrah, McCulby, McDonald, McGowan, Moody, Morgan, Mosher, Murphy, Nelson, Nickerson, Norris, Orrall, Osborne, Parker, Parkhurst, Parris, Parry, Paun, Peirce, Perry, Phinney, Pickens, Pierce, Pittsley, Plummer, porter, Pratt, Quell, Ramsdell, Reed, Reynolds, Robbins, Robinson, Rogers, Russell, Sampson, Sanford, Sawyer, Scott, Seekell, Sharidan, Shaw, Shockley, Shove,...

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Seneca County New York Newspapers

The first settlers in Seneca County had little time for reading papers, and they had very few to read. At Geneva was published in 1797 the Ontario Gazette and Genesee Advertiser, by Lucius Carey; in 1800 the Impartial American, or Seneca Museum, by Ebenezer Eaton; and in 1806 The Expositor, later, Geneva Gazette, by James Bogart. Other of those primal presses were located at various points, but the difficulties of distribution made their circulation local. The pioneer printer of Seneca County was George Lewis, who, in the year 1815, started in the village of Ovid a small sheet entitled the Seneca Patriot. As will be observed, the history of journalism in Seneca County has been little less than a struggle for existence. For more information consult: History of the Seneca County New York Press Unfortunately, no historical paper published in Seneca County has had any issues published online. We know of microfilm, however, which has been created of various issues, some quite voluminous and we can only hope that in the near future somebody will convince one of the local historical societies or libraries to share that microfilm with them so that it can be more widely published online. The following information is an attempt to provide details into not only the history of Seneca County New York newspapers, but also the sources available online and offline for the genealogist and historian to access the newspapers, or transcriptions therefrom. Newspapers remain a vital source of material for genealogists. They often provide vivid insight into the lives of our ancestors unlike other factual records, and should not be overlooked when...

The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his mapsĀ and geographical charts, and also wrote, at his dictation, his journals concerning his voyages. Shortly after the marriage of Columbus and Felipa at Lisbon, they moved to the island of Porto Santo which her father had colonized and was governor at the time of his death, and settled on a large landed estate which belonged to Palestrello, and which he had bequeathed to Felipa together with all his journals and papers. In that home of retirement and peace the young husband and wife lived in connubial bliss for many years. How could it be otherwise, since each had found in the other a congenial spirit, full of adventurous explorations, but which all others regarded as visionary follies? They read together and talked over the journals and papers of Bartolomeo, during which Felipa also entertained Columbus with accounts of her own voyages with her father, together with his opinions and those of other navigators of that age his friends and companions of a possible country that might be discovered in the distant West, and the...

Margaret O’Neill, Mrs. John H. Eaton

To the student of social history few careers surpass in interest that of Margaret O’Neill. Born of humble parentage, she ran the gamut of social possibilities, exercising more influence over the political destinies of her country than any other American woman has ever done. Unlike other great belles who owe their fame to the universal admiration they evoke, Margaret O’Neill owed hers quite as much to the animosity she roused. Her cause hotly espoused by the President of the United States, her conduct made the subject of cabinet debates, she rose to fame as broad as the land of her birth, and later beyond the seas to a fame un-shadowed by enmity, though not dearer to her patriotic soul. Born late in the last century, she came to be a belle in so far as having beaux makes a girl a belle in the days when the native Washington girl had few rivals. The shriek of Fulton’s steamboat had not yet startled the world. The stagecoach was the universal means of conveyance, though the daughters of some Southern and Western Congressmen, from districts unfamiliar even with its lumbering proportions, ambitious to taste the pleasures of a season at the capital, used frequently to make the tedious journey on horseback. Her girlhood belleship had well terminated, indeed she had married and brought children into the world, before the completion of the great canal in 1826, which made the more sanguine voyager of that day hopeful that eventually eight miles might be travelled in an hour! Though she never knew the exact date of her birth, she had heard it frequently...

Biography of Horace Perkins Eaton

Horace Perkins Eaton, for many years a resident of Franklin, Merrimack County, and a highly esteemed and influential citizen, was a native of Weare, N.H. He was born August 30, 1811, and was the eldest son of Wheeler and Abigail (Perkins) Eaton. His father, also a native of Weare, was a shoemaker and tanner by trade. He lived for a while in Seabrook, from which place he removed to Franklin, N.H., where he settled in the northern part of the town and engaged in general farming. He spent the rest of his life on this farm; but in his latter years he sold out to his son-in-law, Dana W. Call, with whom he thenceforward made his home. He died September 1, 1871, Abigail Perkins, bore five children, all of whom are now dead. Their names were: Horace Perkins, Cyrus, Gorham, Emily W., and William. Mrs. Abigail P. Eaton died in 1838; and Mr. Wheeler Eaton married for his second wife Mrs. Nancy Burleigh Sleeper, of Sanbornton, N.H., by whom he had one daughter, Emily, who married Dana W. Call, and is now deceased. Horace Perkins Eaton received his education in the best schools of Weare, and, after he had finished his studies, turned his attention to farming. He was an energetic man and a progressive farmer. In politics he was a Republican, and he was the Representative for the town of Franklin for several years. He also served as Selectman a number of times. He was always an earnest member of the Franklin Christian Church, and took great interest in all church work. He died August 26, 1886. He...

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