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Descendants of Hon. Horatio Leonard Cushman of Taunton, MA

CUSHMAN (Taunton family). The Cushman family of Taunton here briefly reviewed, the family and lineage of the late Hon. Horatio Leonard Cushman, long one of the leading citizens and substantial men of Taunton, at one time the city’s chief executive officer, and who had served most efficiently in both branches of the city government, as alderman and councilman, and who in turn has been followed by his son, Seth Leonard Cushman, Esq., who for many years has been president of the Bristol County National Bank, is a branch of the family bearing the name of ancient Plymouth, which with its allied connections is one of the historic families of New England. Its progenitor, though of short life in New England, was one of the leading spirits in all the preliminary movements in both England and Holland incident to the coming of the “Mayflower” Pilgrims to New England, where his descendants soon allied themselves with those of the “Mayflower” passengers. There follow in brief some of the incidents in the lives of members of this Taunton family, and in those of their forefathers, in chronological order beginning with Robert Cushman, one of the leaders among the Pilgrims. Robert Cushman, a wool carder of Canterbury, England, married (second) at Leyden, Holland, June 3, 1617, Mary, widow of Thomas Chingleton, of Sandwich, England. He was associated with William Brewster as agent of the Leyden Church in negotiations for removal. He came to New England in the “Fortune” in 1621, bringing with him his only son, Thomas. He returned to England on business of the Colony, and died there in 1626. He left...

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel. Woven in the narratives of it’s people, however, is the story of Colorado. Initial expeditions by European settlers in this area were for trade with the Natives or as a throughfare to California further west. It wasn’t until one of those wagon trains came a man name of Ralston and he dipped his pan into a creek which would later bare his name and pulled out a troy ounce of gold, worth $5 at the time. A decade later, and other miners began to claim the land in the eastern Colorado area. Pushing ever westward in search of the golden dust they eventually found their way into western Coloado. Some of these miners would eventually settle in the area of their mines and became Colorado’s first residents. Some would have their claim luck out and would stay taking up other responsibilities such as ranching, politics, merchandising, etc. In these people’s lives became the story of Colorado – so while this volume is comprised almost solely of biographies, it is also comprised of the history of early Western Colorado. Click on the page number to view the biography. SurnameGivenMiddleView Bio BurgerFrankMPage 17 TaylorEdwardTPage 18 ZerbeAllenLPage 21 VeatchWilliamLPage 23 HarpHoraceSPage 24 GeorgeAlfredPage 25 BrownHoraceGPage 26 HeatonWilliamVPage 27 ThompsonBenjaminHPage 28 WatsonBenjaminKPage 29 SherwoodBenjaminPage 30 DicksonAmosJPage...

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

McIntire Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

Jeremiah McIntire was not born at Blue Hill, but came to it a young man, from what place the records do not state. He was published to Lydia Knowles, of Sedgwick, June 8, 1818, and certified June 27, of the same year. Children: Abigail, John, Ingerson, Sarah, Deborah, Freeman, Nathan, Sylvanus and Francis.

Dedham Massachusetts Historical Society Register 1890-1903

From 1890-1903, the Dedham Historical Society in Dedham Massachusetts printed a quarterly pamphlet for it’s historical society called the “Dedham Historical Register.” In this pamphlet a variety of genealogical data was published on families of Dedham and the villages emanating from the early residents of Dedham, such as Dorchester, Franklin, Medfield, Medway, Needham, and Sharon, etc.

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

Allen Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

Amos Allen, born in Sedgwick, Oct. 3, 1772, married Joanna Herrick, of Sedgwick, Dec. 25, 1793, removed to Blue Hill in 1795, where he became owner of Carleton’s mills and of the land and buildings taken up and improved by the Carletons, He was a miller, farmer, ship owner, preacher and a representative to the Maine legislature in 1820-1-2-3, and in 1842, and a man of influence and force of character. He died Jan. 28, 1855, aged 84 years. His children were: Hepzibah, Amos, Ebenezer, Herrick, Amos 2d, Joanna, Joseph, Huldah, Harriet, George and Daniel.

Carleton Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

It appears by the records that there were four person who settled in the south part of the town by the name of Carleton, whose given names were Edward, Dudley, Moses and David, all from Andover, Massachusetts, and evidently brothers. They built the mills first known as Carleton’s mills, mentioned in the town records in 1770 for the first time when Dudley Carleton was elected a selectman, in 1771 was re-elected and in 1772 was chosen one of a committee to keep the fish course clear at Carleton’s mills.

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