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Disbursements to Cherokees under the Treaty of May 6, 1828

Abstract of disbursements and expenditures made by George Vashon, Indian Agent for the Cherokees west of the Mississippi, under the stipulations of the Treaty with said tribe of 6th May, 1828, between the 16th September, 1830, and the 31st December, 1833. In total this list represents 390 Cherokee families and 1835 individuals who each received 25.75 as part of their payment under the 5th article of the treaty of 6th May, 1828.

Sons of Quebec 1778-1843

The Sons of Quebec (Fils de Qu├ębec) were written by Pierre-Georges Roy and published in 1933 in a four volume set. They provide a series of short biographies of one to three pages of Quebec men from 1778-1843. Warning… this manuscript is in French!

Treaty of May 6, 1828

Articles of a Convention, concluded at the City of Washington this sixth day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-eight, between James Barbour, Secretary of War, being especially authorized therefore by the President of the United States, and the undersigned, Chiefs and Head Men of the Cherokee Nation of Indians, West of the Mississippi , they being duly authorized and empowered by their Nation. Whereas, it being the anxious desire of the Government of the United States to secure to the Cherokee nation of Indians, as well those now living within the limits of the Territory of Arkansas, as those of their friends and brothers who reside in States East of the Mississippi, and who may wish to join their brothers of the West, a permanent home, and which shall, under the most solemn guarantee of the United States, be, and remain, theirs forever- a home that shall never, in all future time, be embarrassed by having extended around it the lines, or placed over it the jurisdiction of a Territory or State, nor be pressed upon by the extension, in any way, of any of the limits of any existing Territory or State; and, Whereas, the present location of the Cherokees in Arkansas being unfavorable to their present repose, and tending, as the past demonstrates, to their future degradation and misery; and the Cherokees being anxious to avoid such consequences, and yet not questioning their right to their lands in Arkansas, as secured to them by Treaty, and resting also upon the pledges given them by the President of the United...

Biographical Sketch of George Duval

George Duval, precis writer and secretary of the chief justice and the judges of the Supreme Court of the Dominion, was born in the city of Quebec, on the 19th of December, 1843. His parents were Joseph Duval, merchant, and Adelaide Dubuc, the latter now being the wife of John F. Duval, late chief justice of the Province of Quebec. George was educated at the Jesuits’ College, Montreal, graduating in 1861; studied law first with Messrs. Holt and Irvine, then with L. B. Caron, advocate, being called to the Bar in 1865. He immediately entered upon practice in partnership with Mr. Caron, who has since been appointed judge of the Superior Court of the Province of Quebec. Mr. Duval practiced in his native city until 1874, when he was appointed private secretary to the Hon. Antoine A. Dorion, minister of justice. Subsequently Mr. Duval was appointed private secretary of Hon. T. Fournier, minister of justice, and chief clerk in the department of justice, receiving his appointment to his present position in the Supreme Court, in January, 1876. As precis writer, Mr. Duval is the official law reporter of the court. The Supreme Court’s reports are published in numbers, making yearly a volume of over 750 pages. He is also a Commissioner under the great seal of Canada, for administering oaths in the Supreme Court and in the Exchequer Court of Canada. In June, 1872, Isabella, fourth daughter of Hon. William Power, one of the Judges of the Superior Court of Lower Canada, and of Susanna Aubert de Gaspe, and grand-daughter of the late P. Aubert de Gaspe, became the...

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