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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Exira Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Akers, Lincoln. Wf. Mary; ch. Otto, Laura, Cleo, Bryon, Trilby, Lincoln, Lilly, Vinona, Frank,Alvia, Lewis, Robert and Carol. P. O. Brayton,R. 1. O. 25 ac., sec. 21. (52.) Albertson, Lars. Wf. Hannah; ch. Harry P., Mabel C. and ArnoldN. P. O. Brayton, R. 1. O. 80 ac., sec. 32; O. 80 ac., sec. 29. (11.) Anderson, A. F. Wf. Otilla; ch. Arthur, Vera, Edith, Max and Raymond. P. O. Brayton, R. I. O. 40 ac., sec. 29; O. 119.50 ac., sec. 3O.(19.) Anderson, A. G. Wf. Mildred; ch.Izetta, Ronald and Phil. P. O. Brayton, R. 1. R. 5O.74 ac., sec. 30; R. 120 ac., sec. 29, and in Oakfield Twp., O. 80 an., sec. 35. (21.) Owner, S. L. Kringel Estate. Anderson, George J. Wf. Nellie L.; ch. Harry W., Lester H. and Merald L. P. O. Exira, R. 2. R. 120 ac., sec. 9 (31.) Owner, Chas. Kommes. Andersen, Peter C. Wf. Anna; ch. Lars, Christ, Holga, Marinus, Wm., Arthur and Christina. P. O. Brayton, R. 1. R. 160 ac., sec. 23.(8.) Owner, A. M. Christansen. Anderson, S. R. Wf. Mary. P. O. Brayton, R. 1.R. 40 ac., sec. 29; R. 119.59 ac., sec. 3O. (19.) Owner, A. F. Anderson. Back, Fred. Wf. Maren; ch. Minnie, Christ, Inger, Hattie, Signe and Hilger. P. O. Exira, R. 2. O. 157.79 ac., sec. 6. (29.) Baier, Louis F. Wf. Mary; ch. Kathrine, Norman and Anna M. P. O. Exira, R. 3. O. 171.36 ac., sec. 1.(37.) Baker, Chas. Wf. Anna; ch....

The Spaniards in Alabama and Mississippi

England, having lost her West Florida provinces by the victories of Galvez, and having the American Whigs, as well as the natives of France, Spain and Holland, arrayed against her, was finally forced to retire from the unequal contest. A preliminary treaty of peace was signed at Paris. England there acknowledged our independence, and admitted our southern boundary to be as follows: A line beginning at the Mississippi, at 31° north of the equator, and extending due east to the Chattahoochie River; down that river to the mouth of the Flint, and thence to the St. Mary’s, and along that river to the sea. Great Britain also expressly stipulated, in that treaty, our right to the navigation of the Mississippi River, from its mouth to its source. Jan. 20 1783: Great Britain and Spain entered into a treaty. The former warranted and confirmed to the latter the province of West Florida, and ceded to her East Florida.1 But although England, by the treaty of 1782, assigned to the United States all the territory between the Mississippi and the Chattahoochie, lying between the parallels of latitude 31° and 32° 28′, embracing the same portion of the territory of Alabama and Mississippi, which lay in the British province of West Florida, yet it was not surrendered to us by Spain for years afterwards. Spain occupied it, contending that Great Britain, in the treaty with her, in 1783, warranted the province of West Florida to her, not defining its northern limits, and that England had no right to restrict her limits, even if she had attempted it, for Spain had, before the...

English Settlement on the Holsten River

In the meantime, the wild region upon the Cumberland river was explored, and some temporary establishments formed at the bluff, on which is now situated the city of Nashville. Captain James Robertson was the hero of these bold adventures, and had several times, with a small party of men, cut his way from extreme East Tennessee to that country, passing over the lofty Cumberland mountains and through dangerous Indian settlements. Returning to the Holston, after having made several of these trips, he raised a large company of emigrants, and built boats at Long Island. When they were nearly ready to be launched, he placed himself at the head of a horse party, and set out over the mountains for the Cumberland, intending to leave signs upon the trees at the head of the Muscle Shoals, after going from Nashville to that place. These signs he intended for the purpose of letting the voyagers know whether it would be practicable for them to disembark at the Muscle Shoals and go to the Cumberland by land. A large number of flat boats, filled with emigrants and their effects, began the voyage from Long Island, upon the Holston. Those recollected will be mentioned, for the gratification of descendants. The large Donaldson family, who, after reaching the Cumberland, settled upon Stone’s river, and became connected by affinity with General Andrew Jackson, all embarked on this occasion. Among the others were Robert Cartwright, Benjamin Porter, Mary Henry, Mary Purnell, James Cain, Isaac Neely, John Cotton, — Rounsever, Jonathan Jennings, William Cutchfield, Moses, Joseph and James Renfroe, Solomon Turpin, — Johns, Francis Armstrong, Isaac Lanier,...

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George A. Godsmark, George Wigent, Daniel Place, John J. DeWitt, Jay Henderson, William H. Barr, Josephus Sanborn, John C. Thomas, Michael Hamill, William Mitchell, Henry Thrall, William Motter, George Upright, Thomas J. Hitchcock, Asa Goodrich, Charles Albright, George Hoag, David Wise,...

Biographical Sketch of Enoch S. M. Donaldson

Enoch S. M. Donaldson, son of John H. Donaldson, was born January 19, 1840, in Muskingum County, Ohio. When Enoch was two years of age his father moved to Morgan County, Ohio. He remained with his father until he was twenty-two years of age, during which time he worked on the farm and attended school. He was engaged in fanning until 1864, when he went to Venango County, Pennsylvania, where he worked for three years. During part of this time he was employed by an oil company, and a part of the time worked at the shoemaker’s trade. He also learned to be a practical engineer, and followed that profession for a while. In 1867 he went to Morgan County, Ohio, where he remained a few months, when he went to Caldwell County, Missouri, where he was engaged in farming for several years. After this he moved to Sheridan Township in Daviess County, Missouri, where he purchased a farm and engaged in farming. In 1868 he was married to Miss Charity E. McGarvin. They have had six children: Eva, Emmet, Myrtle, Walter, Joseph and Ella...

Biographical Sketch of I. B. Donaldson

I. B. Donaldson, of the firm of I. B. Donaldson & Co., Norfolk City Bank, is a native of Morrison, Whiteside Co., Ill. In 1869, he was employed in book-keeping at the First National Bank, Morrison, Ill. Has since been engaged at this business. February, 1882, came to Norfolk, and established this...

Biographical Sketch of Milton Donaldson

Milton Donaldson (deceased), the largest capitalist of Lake County, was a native of Alabama, but spent part of his youth in Nashville. After moving to Donaldson’s Point, Missouri, he married Theresa Baird. Mr. Donaldson was a self made man. When he married he had nothing, and by hard work and good management he accumulated an estate worth $150,000. He had but one son, who died in childhood. He was a democrat in politics. Mrs. Donaldson was a Methodist. In 1877 Mr. Donaldson left his home one afternoon to look after his stock. While absent a villain by the name of Murphy entered the house for the purpose of robbing. He first knocked the servant girl down, and thinking she was dead, returned to close the doors, but finding she was not dead, he repeated the blows. He then entered Mrs. Donaldson’s room, and murdered her. As soon as the crime was discovered, the neighbors turned out and found the murderer, and hung him at once. Mr. Donaldson remained a widower until his death, in 1881, and having neither wife nor children to inherit his large estate, it passed into the hands of his nieces and nephews. He was a kind and generous...

Biography of Lauchlan Donalsdon

Lauchlan Donaldson, one of the ablest lawyers of Tiptonville, is the son of Wellington and Elizabeth A (Meriweather) Donaldson. His father was born in St. Johns N.B., and when a young man went to the republic of Texas, where he was engaged with a corps of engineers to survey the Guadalupe River, receiving as compensation a large tract of land. In 1843 he moved to Tennessee, and married Miss Meriweather, in Obion County, who was a native of Montgomery County, Tennessee Soon after they were married they settled at Meriweather’s Landing, and made it their permanent home. Mr. Donaldson, Sr., was by preference an Episcopalian, though neither his wife nor he was connected with any church. He was a Whig until after the war, then a democrat. He enlisted in the Confederate Army during the late war, and became one of the defenders of Island No. 10. During the siege he died. He had four sons, three of them in the Confederate Army. He was for awhile magistrate in Obion County. His wife is still living, and is now seventy two years old. In early life she was quite a huntress, being very expert in using firearms and killing game. Her father moved to Meriweather’s Landing in 1827, when it was thinly settled, only an Indian trail running from Stone Ferry to New Madrid. Our subject, Mr. Lauchlan Donaldson’s ancestors, was Scotch on his father’s side, being the last of the McDonalds, of Glencoe, and on his mother’s side Welsh and English. He was born January 4, 1844, in Hickman, Kentucky, and received his early education in Obion County....

Slave Narrative of Sarah Ross

Interviewer: Alfred Farrell Person Interviewed: Sarah Ross Location: Live Oak, Florida Born in Benton County, Mississippi nearly eighty years ago, Sarah is the daughter of Harriet Elmore and William Donaldson, her white owner. Donaldson was a very cruel man and frequently beat Sarah’s mother because she would not have sexual relations with the overseer, a colored man by the name of Randall. Sarah relates that the slaves did not marry, but were forced – in many cases against their will – to live together as man and wife. It was not until after slavery that they learned about the holy bonds of matrimony, and many of them actually married. Cotton, corn and rice were the chief products grown on the Donaldson plantation. Okra also was grown, and from this product coffee was made. The slaves arose with the sun to begin their tasks in the fields and worked until dusk. They were beaten by the overseer if they dared to rest themselves. No kind of punishment was too cruel or severe to be inflicted upon these souls in bondage. Frequently the thighs of the male slaves were gashed with a saw and salt put in the wound as a means of punishment for some misdemeanor. The female slaves often had their hair cut off, especially those who had long beautiful hair. If a female slave was pregnant and had to be punished, she was whipped about the shoulders, not so much in pity as for the protection of the unborn child. Donaldson’s wife committed suicide because of the cruelty not only to the slaves but to her as well....

Biographical Sketch of Mary A Donaldson

When Carrie E. Crowe was called away in January 1906, the place was rather reluctantly assumed but very acceptably filled by Mrs. Sarah L. Wallace of Fairhope, Alabama. After two months she also was called away. The place was then filled by Mary A. Donaldson of Paris, Texas. She had been an attendant at the first Oak Hill Normal, in 1905, and then became a missionary teacher at Grant. Attendance at the Normal led to her recognition, both at Grant and Oak Hill. After teaching several years she pursued another course of training at New Orleans and has become a professional...
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