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Genealogy of Garriot K. Broyles

Broyles, Bruhls, Broils,Broiles originated from northwestern Germany. There are two towns one of which is Bruhl along the west side of the Rhine River. The largest community has an 18th century castle called Augustburg. The archbishop of Cologne had created the town in 1285. The family Brohl had lived in the area as early as the 14th century as in 1332 one Brohl had received a coat of arms. Some of the Broyles family came to America in 1717 to Culpepper, Virginia. The first was John Broyles who had several sons who were the ancestors for many of the Broyles today. The Broyles story here begins with the first one who came to Shelby County, Illinois. There has been much difficulty trying to pinpoint the ancestry of Garriot K. Broyles’ parents. His ancestry will be printed in a later volume. Garriot K. Broyles was born circa 1810 in Madison Coop Virginia. He had one known brother Ephraim and one sister Martha. In later years Garriot stated on his second marriage application that he was the son of Moses and Susannah Broyles, Garriot married Eunice V. Wayman on 22 December 1831 in Madison Co., Virginia. Eunice was the probable daughter of John Henry and Margaret Frances Wayman. Apparently the Broyles family lived near Harrisonburg, Virginia since one of their sons was born there. Sometime in 1858 the family moved to Shelby Co., Illinois. Garriot bought a mortgage from Zee D. Nichols for $150 for ten acres in Sec 4 T 10 R 3 E in Dry Point Township. Garriot and his wife Eunice were still there in 1868 when his...

General Thomas C. Devin Assumed Command in Arizona

Early in 1868 General Thomas C. Devin assumed command in Arizona. He was an able and active officer and carried on vigorous and most difficult scouts into the very heart of the Apache territory south of the Mogollons, north of the Gila, and throughout the Salt River regions; but, in spite of his best efforts, he rarely found any Indians, though the troops came upon numerous deserted rancherĂ­as. He also broke new trails into hitherto almost inaccessible Apache haunts and made maps for the guidance of future expeditions. Sometime in 1868 General Devin broke up the temporary reservation at Fort Goodwin, established in 1866, because the Indians would not give up known murderers among them nor promise to settle down permanently. Also a temporary reservation at Camp Grant for Pinal Apaches was abandoned for the reason that these Indians would not agree to the required terms. Between April and September, 1868, the troops in Arizona made forty-six scouting expeditions; almost every Apache-infested part of the Territory was covered, but with meager results. Only thirty Indians were killed and seven captured in the course of these costly and difficult expeditions. It was a very different story during the year 1869. Early in 1868 General E. O. C. Ord succeeded McDowell as Commander of the Department of California. His attitude toward the hostile Apaches was grim and forceful. He instructed his “troops to capture and root out the Apaches by every means, and to hunt them as they would wild animals.” In his report of 1869 he states that his orders were carried out “with unrelenting vigor. . . . Over...

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