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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Biography of Honorable Reuben Hatch

Reuben Hatch was born at Preston, Connecticut, July 7, 1763, and came to Norwich at an early age with his father, Joseph Hatch. He entered Dartmouth College in 1782, but was unable to complete his course of studies there by reason of ill health. Afterwards he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits and became a successful farmer; residing at different times at Tunbridge, Chelsea and Weathersfield. From “Life and Times of William Jarvis” we make the following extracts: “Mr. Reuben Hatch came from Norwich to Weathersfield Bow and bought the large brick house built by a Mr. Jennison, and considerable other property. He had a large family of sons and daughters. * * * Mr. Hatch also bought” (soon after, probably) “Mr. George Lyman‘s house, tavern and store,” (at the Bow) “and Mr. Lyman returned to Hartford, Conn.” “In 1801 or ’02 Mr. Francis Goodhue bought all of Mr. Hatch’s property except the Lyman house and a small store. Mr. Hatch then returned to Norwich,” [another account says he returned to Norwich in 1808.] Mr. Hatch represented Tunbridge in the General Assembly in 1792, ’93 and ’95, Chelsea in 1797, ’98 and 1801; was councilor in 1808. He was candidate for town representative from Norwich, but was defeated by Pierce Burton, and again defeated for the same office in 1812 by Dr. Israel Newton. Mr. Hatch was married to Eunice Dennison, and they had ten children. One daughter married Darius Jones of Weathersfield and Windsor; one, Harriet H., married Rev. Abraham Peters, a distinguished clergyman and author, October 25, 1819; one married Joseph Cutting of Weathersfield, who, afterwards, lived...

History of the Industries of Norwich VT

Although the products of the industries in Norwich have not been of great magnitude they have been quite varied in character. Such information in regard to these callings as we have been able to obtain we will present to our readers, though not in strict chronological order. Among the earliest establishments coming under this head was a grist mill established as early as 1770, by Hatch and Babcock on Blood Brook, on or near the site of the grist mill now operated by J. E. Willard, a short distance up the stream from where it empties into the Connecticut River. As has been stated in a previous chapter, it was voted at a proprietors’ meeting held September 17, 1770, to give to Joseph Hatch and Oliver Babcock the “tenth river lot on condition they execute a deed * * * * for upholding a grist mill where said gristmill now stands.” Since the ownership by Hatch and Babcock this property has been in the possession among others of Aaron Storrs, who sold it in 1793 to Doctor Joseph Lewis; Horace Esterbrook, who sold it to J. J. Morse; the latter to G. W. Kibling; Kibling to Crandall and Burbank; they to Doctor Rand of Hartford, Vt., and from the latter’s estate, J. E. Willard, the present proprietor, bought it. During Mr. Kibling‘s ownership of the property he had a department for making doors, window sashes, etc., in addition to a grist mill. In 1766, Jacob Burton built a saw mill on the north bank of Blood Brook, a little further down the stream than Messenger and Hazen‘s late tannery...

Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic; and yet candor and the truth of history compels us to confess that there were here, as in most other towns throughout the north, a few disloyal spirits who sympathized with the Slaveholders’ rebellion, who denounced the war from beginning to end, and who scarcely concealed their satisfaction when news came of rebel...

Biography of Francis Morrill Cutting

Francis Morrill Cutting, who died on November 15, 1888, was a valued citizen of Newport, Sullivan County. He was born in the neighboring town of Croydon, November 28, 1825, a son of Francis and Keziah (Hudson) Cutting. His grandfather, Benjamin Cutting, who enlisted in the Continental army when a young man, Croydon. Francis Cutting, son of Benjamin, was born in Croydon, and there spent his life of seventy-eight years. He owned about five hundred acres of land, and was extensively engaged in farming and stock-raising. His first wife, Keziah Hudson, a native of Goshen, N.H., died at the age of seventy-six; and he subsequently married Miss Mary Rollins. By the first wife he had nine children, by the second two; and of the whole family seven are now living. Francis Morrill Cutting grew up on a farm, acquiring his education in the schools of his native town. After reaching man’s estate, he engaged in farming and cattle-raising, purchasing land in the western part of Newport. A wise manager, square in his dealings, and a good practical farmer, he had a valuable property, comprising some five hundred acres, his farm in Newport alone covering one hundred acres. In politics Mr. Cutting was a Democrat, in religious belief a Methodist. He was a man of sterling character, conscientious and honest, and was respected by all who knew him. Mr. Cutting was married July 25, 1855, to Hannah A., daughter of Dimmick and Hannah (Colby) Baker. She was born in Meriden, N.H., October 4, 1832. Mrs. Cutting is a member of an old New England family. Her ancestors came from England. Joseph...

Biography of Freeman Cutting

Freeman Cutting, a prosperous farmer of Newport, was born in Croydon, N.H., July 19, 1821, son of Francis and Keziah (Hudson) Cutting. His grandfather, Benjamin Cutting, one of the first settlers of Croydon, was an energetic and successful farmer; and he served his country in the Revolutionary War. Benjamin and his wife, Anna Bemas Cutting, died at the respective ages of eighty-eight and ninety years. Of their thirteen children none are now living. Francis Cutting, who was next to the youngest, followed his father’s occupation, that of farming. He was also an extensive stock dealer, in fact, doing, it is claimed, the largest business in that line in Sullivan County. Shepherd Cutting, of Newport; Addison Cutting, of Croydon; Mrs. Diantha Young, the wife of Israel Young, of Newport; and Mrs. Philinda Pike. The others were: Alfred, Irena, Morrill, and Elan. Freeman Cutting grew up on the old farm in Croydon, receiving his education in the town schools. At the age of twenty-one he purchased one hundred and twenty-one acres of land adjoining his father’s property in Newport. After living on this estate for eleven years, he sold it and bought another in Claremont, on which he resided for eight years. At the end of that time he moved back to Newport, and in 1871 he bought the property on which he now resides. It contains four hundred acres, which, taken with what he owns elsewhere, makes about nine hundred acres belonging to him. He has one of the best sets of farm buildings in the town, and the appearance of thrift and progress is visible everywhere. He has worked...

Biography of Jonas Cutting, LL.D.

JONAS CUTTING, LL. D., son of Jonas Cutting and Betsey Eames Cutting, and grandson of Jonas, senior, was born in Croydon, on the 3d of November, 1800. He prepared for college, principally under the tuition of Otis Hutchins, then Principal of Kimball Union Academy in Plainfield, and entered the Freshman Class at Dartmouth College in 1819. He graduated in 1823, and subsequently read law, first with the late Hon. Henry Hubbard, of Charlestown, and the third year with Hon. Reuel Williams, at Augusta, Maine, where he was admitted to the bar in 1826. Thence he removed to the town of Orono, in Penobscot county, where he remained in the practice of his profession until October, 1831, when he removed to Bangor, the shire town of the same county. In 1833 he was married to Lucretia H., daughter of John Bennoch, Esq., of Orono. They had three daughters and one son, the eldest, Rebecca D., died in infancy; the second, Elizabeth J., at the age of 15, and his son, Frederick H., in his 21st year. His only surviving child is Helen A., who is married to Dr. Augustus C. Hamlin, only son of Hon. Elijah L. Hamlin, brother of the late Vice-President. His wife, Lucretia, died in 1842. In 1843 he was again married to Ann R., youngest daughter of the late Hon. Samuel Fales, of Taunton, Mass., with whom he now lives and resides in the city of Bangor. In 1854 Mr. Cutting was appointed Judge of the Supreme Judicial Court of his adopted State, and at the end of seven years, the duration of the judicial tenor,...

Biographical Sketch of Freeman Cutting

FREEMAN CUTTING, son of Francis Cutting, was born July 19, 1821. He was one of the Vice-Presidents on the day of Celebration, has raised up a large family, and been one of the most energetic and prosperous farmers in Sullivan County. FRANCIS M. CUTTING and SHEPHERD H. CUTTING, brothers of the above, both married daughters of Dimmick Baker, Esq., of Plainfield, and are among the most thriving farmers of...

Biographical Sketch of Jonathan Cutting

JONATHAN CUTTING, Son of Jonathan Cutting, early in life removed to Newport where he was extensively engaged in town business, and was an active and worthy deacon in the Baptist church. He was a man of “infinite jest.” I will relate only one of the many anecdotes told of him. Once laboring for a man whose love of gain required his hands to be up, eat breakfast, and be miles away to the woods with an ox team before light, he wished to give him a gentle reminder that he was asking too much-which was done in this wise: When asked to pray one morning, he commenced thus: “We thank thee, 0 Lord, that thou hast brought us in safety thus far through the night, and if in thy providence we are permitted to see the light of another day, may we go forth to its duties with a cheerful heart and in thy fear,” &c. The next morning he was permitted to eat his breakfast by...
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