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Lovering Family Genealogy of Taunton Massachusetts

Through much of the nineteenth century there figured prominently in the business and social life of Taunton — continuing to do so at the present — the family bearing the name introducing this sketch. Reference is made to the late Hon. Willard Lovering, long one of the leading manufacturers not only of Taunton, but of the great manufacturing region thereabout, in both Massachusetts and Rhode Island, a representative in the Massachusetts Assembly, bank president, etc.; and to his sons and grandsons, the former being the late Charles L., the late Hon. William C. and Hon. Henry Morton Lovering, all of whom are or have been officers in the Whittenton Manufacturing Company and among the leading business men and citizens of their city, William C. having been the representative in the United States Congress from the 12th and 14th Massachusetts districts. The home town of this Taunton Lovering family for generations was Holliston, where the name was well represented in the struggle of the colonies for independence, and from which town and vicinity went out into other localities men of achievement. It was from this Holliston stock sprang the eminent lawyer, Hon. Warren Lovering, of Medway, born Feb. 21, 1797, who was often a member of the State Assembly, a member of the executive council for some years in the thirties, at the time being in warm personal relations with the then governor of Massachusetts, the Hon. Edward Everett, Bank Commissioner, etc.; and his brother, the late Hon. Amos Lovering, lawyer and judge, who figured prominently in the South and West. These were the sons of Amos and Lucy (Day)...

Victims of the Fugitive Slave Law – Fugitive Slave Law

The remainder of this Tract will be devoted to a record, as complete as circumstances enable us to make, of the Victims Of The Fugitive Slave Law. It is a terrible record, which the people of this country should never allow to sleep in oblivion, until the disgraceful and bloody system of Slavery is swept from our land, and with it, all Compromise Bills, all Constitutional Guarantees to Slavery, all Fugitive Slave Laws. The established and accredited newspapers of the day, without reference to party distinctions, are the authorities relied upon in making up this record, and the dates being given with each case, the reader is enabled to verify the same, and the few particulars which the compass of the Tract allows to be given with each. With all the effort which has been made to secure a good degree of completeness and exactness, the present record must of necessity be an imperfect one, and fall short of exhibiting all the enormities of the Act in question. James Hamlet, of New York, September, 1850, was the first victim. He was surrendered by United States Commissioner Gardiner to the agent of one Mary Brown, of Baltimore, who claimed him as her slave. He was taken to Baltimore. An effort was immediately made to purchase his freedom, and in the existing state of the public feeling, the sum demanded by his mistress, $800, was quickly raised. Hamlet was brought back to New York with great rejoicings. Near Bedford, Penn., October 1. Ten fugitives, from Virginia, were attacked in Pennsylvania—, one mortally wounded, another dangerously. Next morning, both were captured. Five...

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