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Couch, Lucy E. – Obituary

Lucy E. Couch, 92, of 1091 Creek Hollow Road, died Tuesday Aug. 13. A native and lifelong resident of Oconee County, Mrs. Couch was a daughter of the late Thomas N. Epps (Note: from Connie Epps Bond, this name was in error should have been Early Oscar Epps) and the late Annie Herndon Epps. She was married to the late H.D. Couch. She was a member of the Watkinsville First Baptist Church. Funeral services will be at 3 p.m. Thursday at Bridges Funeral Home chapel. The Rev Durell Rice will officiate, and burial will be in Evergreen Memorial Park. The body will be placed in the chapel at 2 p.m. Pallbears will be I. C. Thornton, Don Guyton Sr., Don Guyton Jr., T. J. Eppps, J. A. Mowrer and Basil Thornton. Survivors include a son Jack W. Couch, Watkinsville; four grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; six great-great grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews. The family is at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Jack W. Couch, 1091 Creek Hollow Road, and will received friends at the funeral home from 7-9 tonight. Additional Comments: Notes from Connie Epps Bond Lucy Belle Epps was the daughter of: Early Oscar Epps and Anna L. Herndon gdaughter of: Thomas North and Penelope Jennings Epps ggdaughter of: William and Sara Alexander Epps. She had a full sister Cora Lee Epps, full brother named Oscar Earl Epps. She had a half sister: Sara Epps. She had three half brothers: Otis, Willie, Luther Epps Athens Daily News, Athens, GA, August...

Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of government resembling that of the United States. It is a lesser known fact that there was considerably more intermarriage between Cherokees and Whites than any other tribe, so they have a genealogical significance far out of proportion to their historical numbers. There is also a great deal of genealogical data on the Cherokees, mostly in the form of census records and enrollment records. All of which is to point out the abundance of sources available to Emmet Starr when he came to pen his classic History of the Cherokee Indians and Their Legends and Folklore. Not to diminish Mr. Starr’s contribution in writing about the early Cherokees, their constitution, treaties with the federal government, land transactions, school system, migration and resettlement, committees, councils, and officials, religion, language, and culture, and a host of other topics upon which he writes eloquently, but his stated purpose in writing the History was “to make it as near a personal history and biography of as many Cherokees as possible.” And in fact more than...

Biography of Capt. John H. Couch

CAPT. JOHN H. COUCH. – A native of Newburyport, Massachusetts, he was one of the handful of hardy, brave, adventurous settlers who made the wilderness their home, and devoted the best portions of their lives in opening the way and preparing the land for the immigration and occupation of their brothers across the mountains. He was born February 21, 1811, and was perhaps influenced by the surroundings in his native place; for Newburyport is noted as one of the oldest and most famous seaports and nurseries of maritime enterprises in America. Be that as it may, he manifested in early boyhood a disposition to pursue a seaman’s life, and had an early opportunity to follow the bent of his inclinations, as he shipped on a voyage to the East Indies on the brig Mars while yet a lad. The brig was owned by an uncle of Captain Flanders (afterwards associated with Captain Couch in business for many years); and this first voyage opened the way to others with such good fortune that in 1840 the command of a vessel was given him by the leading shipowner and great merchant of his native place, none other than the father of that eminent lawyer and distinguished statesman, Honorable Caleb Cushing. This first voyage of Captain Couch’s command was to the land of the settling sun. His brig, the Maryland, carried a venture for the Columbia river, which was to be exchanged for a cargo of salmon for the return voyage. We can estimate to some extent the high opinion the great merchant entertained of the integrity and masterly seamanship of Captain...
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