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Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic; and yet candor and the truth of history compels us to confess that there were here, as in most other towns throughout the north, a few disloyal spirits who sympathized with the Slaveholders’ rebellion, who denounced the war from beginning to end, and who scarcely concealed their satisfaction when news came of rebel...

Biography of William F. Coon, M. D.

William F. Coon, M. D., whose talents and qualifications have brought him into prominence as a physician and as a citizen of Caney, came to this state from Minnesota, where he was in practice several years, and by birth he is a Wisconsin man. Born at Eau Claire, Wisconsin, September 20, 1875, he is a son of William F. Coon, and a descendant of ancestors who came from England to the United States in colonial times. His grandfather died in New York State. William F. Coon, Sr., was born in New York in 1825, grew up there, and when a young man went to Eau Claire, Wisconsin, at that time one of the foremost centers of the lumber industry in the state. He was a farmer and also bought and sold horses on a large scale. Politically he was a republican. When nearly fifty years of age he married Emily M. Roberts, who was born in 1853, and is still living at Eau Claire. Doctor Coon was the older of their two sons. His brother, John R., is a resident of Dallas, Texas, and is cashier and adjuster for the Southern Rock Island Plow Company. It was largely through his own determined efforts that Doctor Coon acquired a liberal education. He attended the public schools of Eau Claire, also Wayland Academy at Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, and his schooling was then interrupted by two years of work for self-support. In 1899 he entered the medical department of the University of Minnesota, and was graduated M. D. in 1903. Additional experience preparatory to practice was given him during a year he...

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