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Descendants of Nicholas Snow of Eastham, MA

Nicholas Snow, a native of England, came to this country in 1623 in the ship “Ann,” locating in Plymouth, where he had a share in the division of land in 1624. In 1634 he removed to Eastham, where he became a prominent citizen. His home was on the road from Plymouth to Eel river, on the Westerly side. He was admitted a freeman in 1633, and was elected town clerk at the first meeting of the town of Eastham, holding that office sixteen years. He was deputy to the General Court from 1648, three years; selectman from 1663, seven years. He and his son Mark signed the call to Rev. John Mayo to settle as their minister in 1655. He was one of Gov. Thomas Prence’s associates. He married at Plymouth, Constance, daughter of Stephen Hopkins, who came over in the “Mayflower.” Constance herself came in the “Mayflower.” She died in October, 1677. Mr. Snow died Nov. 15, 1676, in Eastham, Mass.

Knowles Family of New Bedford, MA

The family bearing this name in New Bedford, where it is one of nearly one hundred years’ standing one, too, of prominence and wealth, is a branch of the ancient Knowles family of the town of Eastham, Barnstable county, this Commonwealth. Reference is made to some of the descendants of the brothers Thomas and James H. Knowles of Eastham, several of whose sons – at least two of the former and one of the latter – in their earlier manhood cast their lot with the people of New Bedford. The firm of Thomas Knowles & Co. for many years was one of the greatest engaged in the whale fishery business in New Bedford; and its members in turn have been succeeded in business by younger generations who have most worthily worn the family name and sustained its reputation; and today the name continues of record in and about the city of their birth connected prominently with many of the most extensive commercial establishments and banking institutions of the locality.

Descendants of Thomas Boyden of Bridgewater, MA

BOYDEN (Walpole-Bridgewater family). For a half century – for fifty and more years: – the name Boyden has stood in the town of Bridgewater, Mass., as a synonym for the highest type of useful, ennobling and elevating citizenship, as exemplified in the life of the now venerable principal emeritus of the Bridgewater State Normal School, Prof. Albert Gardner Boyden, who for the long period of fifty and more years has been identified as student, teacher and principal with the noted institution of learning alluded to, and has reared a son who has taken up the work so recently laid down by the father and is now carrying it forward in a manner worthy of him whose mantle he wears. Reference is made to Prof. Arthur Clarke Boyden. This Boyden family of Bridgewater is descended from Thomas Boyden, of Watertown, who came in the ship “Francis” from Ipswich, England, in 1634, when aged twenty-one years. He was of Scituate in the following year, uniting with the church there May 17th of that same year. He was made a freeman in 1647. By his wife Frances he had children: Thomas, born Sept. 26, 1639; Mary, born Oct. 15, 1641; Rebecca, born Nov. 1, 1643; Nathaniel, born in 1650; Jonathan, born Feb. 20, 1652; and Sarah, born Oct. 12, 1654. The father removed to Boston in 1651 and Jonathan and Sarah were born there. The mother of these died March 17, 1658, and he married Nov. 3d, following, Mrs. Hannah Morse, widow of Joseph, and removed in a few years to Medfield. So far as is known only one of the sons...

Chase Family of Fall River MA

CHASE (Fall River family). The Chase family here considered is strictly speaking a Massachusetts-Rhode Island one, springing as it does from the early Roxbury Yarmouth family, a later generation of which located in Portsmouth, R. I. In the third generation from the immigrant ancestor through Joseph Chase, who located in Swansea, Mass., and Benjamin, who settled in Portsmouth, R. I., have descended the Chases who have come from those respective localities. And both branches have shared largely in the commercial and industrial life of this section of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. From the Portsmouth branch came the late Borden Chase, who for years was a coal dealer in Fall River, and his son, the present Simeon Borden Chase, has long been one of the fore-most cotton manufacturers of that same city and as well a most active and influential citizen. There follows in chronological order from the immigrant settler, William Chase, the genealogy and family history of the Portsmouth-Fall River family just alluded to. William Chase, born about 1595, in England, with wife Mary and son William came to America in the ship with Governor Winthrop and his colony in 1630, settling first in Roxbury. He soon became a member of the church of which the Rev. John Eliot, the Apostle to the Indians, was pastor. On Oct. 19, 1630, he applied for freemanship and was admitted a freeman May 14, 1634. In 1637, or thereabout, he became one of the company who made a new settlement at Yarmouth, of which town lie was made constable in 1639. He resided at Yarmouth the rest of his life, dying in...

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Descendants of John Saxton Kent of North Bridgewater, MA

HON. JOHN SAXTON KENT, ex-mayor of the city of Brockton, and one of that city’s leading manufacturers, is as well one of the most enterprising and progressive citizens who have made their way to success in this Commonwealth. Merit commands recognition, and the deserving find doors opening and the way growing plainer as they go onward. In the life of Mr. Kent we have a noble example of the result of pluck, untiring energy and perseverance, combined with natural business acumen, he being the architect of his own successful career, and having acquired, through his own capabilities, a place among the foremost and prosperous shoe manufacturers of the State. Mr. Kent is a native of Brockton, which at the time of his birth was known as North Bridgewater, born April 18, 1860, only son of Patrick and Susan (Saxton) Kent. Patrick Kent, the father, came to North Bridgewater in 1854, and has been a respected resident of the community in which his long and industrious life has been spent. For about forty years he was a trusted employee of the well known firm of Howard & Clark, furniture dealers, since which time he has been living retired, enjoying the comforts of life surrounded by his children and grandchildren, and although in his eighty-third year is still possessed of his faculties and good health. Mr. Kent was united in marriage with Susan Saxton, who passed away in Brockton in June, 1905, aged seventy-four years, the mother of three children: John Saxton is the subject of this review: Mary Alice is the wife of William H. Fitzpatrick, of Brockton, where they...

1918 Warren County Farmers’ Directory – C Surnames

Abbreviations Used in this Directory a–Acres; Ch — Children; O–Owner; T–Tenant or Renter; R –Rural Route; Sec-Section; Maiden name of wife follows directory name in parentheses (); figures at end of information–year became resident of county. Star (*) indicates children not at home. Name of farm follows names of children in quotations marks. In case of a tenant, the farm owner’s name follows the figures giving size of farm. Example: ABBEY, William L. (Lena Riggs) Martha and Cora Abbey, Mother and Sister; Kirkwood R1 Tompking Sec8-5 T80a H.M. Abbey Est. (1886) Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood MEANS ABBEY, William L. – Name (Lena Riggs) – Wife’s maiden name. Martha and Cora Abbey – Mother and Sister Kirkwood R1 – Postoffice Kirkwood, R.F.D. 1. Tompking Sec8-5 – Township Tompking, Sections 8-5. T80a – Tenant on 80 acres. H.M. Abbey Est. – Owner of 80 acres. (1886) – Lived in county since 1886. Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood – Farmers’ Line Telephone Kirkwood. C Surnames CABLE BROS., Arthur L. Benn D., Monmouth R6 Floyd Sec18-30 O160a (1860) Mutual Tel. Monmouth CABLE, Charles H. (Phebe Jane Baldwin) Ch *Florence M., *Newton B.; Monmouth R6 Floyd Sec29 O60a (1860) Mutual Tel. Berwick CABLE, Frank E. (Irene Sheldon) Ch Ruth, *H Sheldon; Berwick R1 Berwick Sec8-17 O400a (1862) Private Tel. Berwick CABLE, Hiram Sheldon (Eunice Ralston)Ch Martha; Berwick R1 Berwick Sec8 T76a Mrs. Irene Cable (1893) Berwick Tel. Berwick CABLE, Newton B. (Della Stilfield) Ch Jane; Berwick Floyd Sec32 T158a Donald L. Atkin (1888) CALDEN, Fred W. (Gertrude Beard) Ch Dorothy; Alexis R2 Kelly Sec8-5 O320a Sec4 T80a Fannie E. Calden (1870) Tel. Farmers’ Line Alexis...

Captain McGehee, G. M. D. No. 673, Harrisonville District

Captain McGehee, G. M. D. No. 673, Harrisonville District Allen, James A. Allen, John A. Allen, Matthew Arnold, John Bailey, Jeremiah Bailey, Joseph Bailey, William Baley, James W. Barnes, Micajah R. Beck, Jacob Bird, John Black, Joseph Brooks, Biving Brooks, Julius H. Brown, Robert W. Bruster, Sheriff Bryant, Ransom R. Butt, Frederick A. Cardin, Jesse Cardwell, James Cardwell, John Cawsey, Absalom Cawsey, William Chapman, Berry Clark, John Cobb, Samuel B. Coney, William Cook, Philip Cox, Thomas W. Dewberry, Giles Dewberry, John Duke, John M. Duke, Thomas Duncan, Nathaniel Edwards, Asa Evans, William G. Ford, Bartholomew Ford, Jesse Freel, Howell Fuller, David Furgerson, William Galding, Robert Germany, Augustus B. Germany, John P. Glenn, James, Esq. Goode, James S. Goode, Mackarness Gray, Thomas Greer, Henry Grice, Larry Hallsey, Benjamin L. Harrist, Archibald M. Harrist, Daniel Harrist, John Harrist, Thomas M. Hewston, James Hightower, Arnold Holderfield, John Holsey, Benjamin W. Holt, Thomas S. Horn, Joshua Howell, Philip Hutchins, Littleberry Jennings, Coleman Jennings, James R. Jennings, John Johnson, James F. Johnson, Sankey T. Johnston, Isham Johnston, James Johnston, Lindsey Johnston, Posey Johnston, Samuel A. Jones, Jefferson Justice, William Leath, William C. Lee, Athanatius Looser, John C. Loran, John Lyons, Robert Matthews, Frederick McGehee, William McKnight, William McLain, James Meacham, John Menefee, William Miller, Homer P. M. Mitcham, Hezekiah Mitcham, James Morton, Duke O’Kelly, Stephen O’Neal, Bryan Owen, Jeremiah Pane, Joseph Patterson, John, Sr. Peavy, Hiram P. Peavy, James Peavy, James (2) Peavy, James E. Phillips, Hardy Phillips, Henry J. B. Phillips, James T. Poe, William Pugh, John Reason, Richard A. Richardson, Jacob Richardson, Lucian H. Richardson, Moses Saint John, Thomas B. Scroggins, Sanders...

Washington Irving at Fort Gibson, 1832

The McIntosh Creeks had been located along Arkansas River near the Verdigris on fertile timbered land which they began at once to clear, cultivate, and transform into productive farms. The treaty of 1828 with the Cherokee gave the latter a great tract of land on both sides of Arkansas River embracing that on which the Creeks were located. This was accomplished by a blunder of the Government officials, in the language of the Secretary of War,1 “when we had not a correct knowledge of the location of the Creek Indians nor of the features of the country.” This situation produced much unhappiness and contention between the people of the two tribes. The Indians had other grievances, and the Creeks took the lead in calling the attention of the officials to their needs by the preparation of a memorial in which they complained of frequent attacks upon them by bands of wild Indians from the south and west of their location. They asked the Government to appoint a commission to meet with them for the redress of their wrongs, and to call a council of the different tribes for the adoption of measures to establish peace and security in their new home. The Creek memorial and a long report by the Secretary of War on February 16, 1832, were transmitted to Congress by President Jackson,2 who recommended that three commissioners be appointed as requested in the memorial, and recommended by the Secretary. It appeared from the report of the Secretary of War that there were then west of the Mississippi twenty-five hundred Creeks, six thousand Choctaw, thirty-five hundred Cherokee and...

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