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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Baker Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

Among the very early settlers at Steuben was Lemuel Baker, who came from Roxbury, Mass. He must have come about, or soon after, the time that the Leightons came. He married a Tracy, sister of Mrs. Thomas Leighton, 2d, and Mrs. Deacon Stevens. He settled near the shore of Joy’s Bay, on what is known as Baker’s Point, afterwards near where the George Baker house is. By his first wife he had four children. George, Nabby, Rhoda, and Dolly. After the death of his first wife, which occurred while these children were young, Mr. Baker moved to Massachusetts and there married Abigail Griggs, and by her had two children, Susanna and Eli F., both born in Roxbury, and while they were young again moved to Steuben, where Lemuel and Abigail lived for the remainder of their days.

1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Mary F., emp. H. S. & H., h. 16 East Main View the Complete Directory Surnames in the Town of Lakeville Massachusetts You will find the directory of Lakeville Massachusetts starts on page 161. Aldrich, Allen, Anderson, Ashley, Audet, Barnes, Barney, Barton, Bassett, Bennett, Benton, Best, Boman, Briggs, Brown, Bullock, Bump, Bumpus, Burgess, Canedy, Card, Carlin, Caswell, Chace, Clark, Clarke, Cole, Collins, Coombs, Cudworth, Cushman, Davis, Dean, DeMoranville, Dexter, Drake, Dushane, Ellers, Elmer, Elwell, Farmer, Farnham, Ford, Frades, Freeman, Frost, Gerrish, Gifford, Gilman, Gilpatrick, Godfrey, Grady, Griffith, Hackett, Hafford, Hale, Hall, Hammond, Harlow, Harrington, Harvey, Haskell, Haskins, Hayes, Haynes, Hinds, Hinkley, Hoard, Hoffman, Holloway, Horr, Horton, Morton, Howland, Johnson, Jones, Keith, Kelley, Kenney, Kinsley, Lang, Leach, Leonard, Letcher, Lincoln, Loner, Luther, Macomber, Mann, Manning, Marrah, McCulby, McDonald, McGowan, Moody, Morgan, Mosher, Murphy, Nelson, Nickerson, Norris, Orrall, Osborne, Parker, Parkhurst, Parris, Parry, Paun, Peirce, Perry, Phinney, Pickens, Pierce, Pittsley, Plummer, porter, Pratt, Quell, Ramsdell, Reed, Reynolds, Robbins, Robinson, Rogers, Russell, Sampson, Sanford, Sawyer, Scott, Seekell, Sharidan, Shaw, Shockley, Shove,...

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

A History of Seneca Falls New York Newspapers

The following information is an attempt to provide details into not only the history of Seneca Falls New York newspapers, but also the sources available online and offline for the genealogist and historian to access the newspapers, or transcriptions therefrom. Newspapers remain a vital source of material for genealogists. They often provide vivid insight into the lives of our ancestors unlike other factual records.

A History of Waterloo New York Newspapers

The pioneer printer of Seneca County was George Lewis, who, in the year 1815, started in the village of Ovid a small sheet entitled the Seneca Patriot. The office of publication was located on Seneca Street, in the upper story of a building on whose site the engine-house now stands. At the close of a single volume, Mr. Lewis changed the name of his paper to The Ovid Gazette, and when Elisha Williams secured the removal of the County seat to Waterloo, Lewis removed hither with his press in May, 1817, and continued the issue of his paper as The Waterloo Gazette, which thus became known also as the first paper published in that village. A partial file of these papers is preserved in the rooms of the Historical Society at Waterloo. The oldest copy is Vol. I., No. 6. It is printed upon coarse paper, and is simply plain in execution. Its terms were: Delivered, S2.00 a year; at office, $1.75; club rates, S1.50, and deductions made to post-riders. Herein John Goodwin informs the public that he has added another boat to his ferry, which will enable him to keep one on each side of the Lake Seneca. William Thompson, Esq., gives an order of sale at vendue of a part of the real estate of Thomas W. Roosevelt, of Junius. Lewis Birdsall, then sheriff, offers for sale his tavern-stand near the turnpike gate in Junius. John Watkins gives notice for debtors to settle under penalty of a positive prosecution, and a lover of beer enters his protest against adulterating his favorite beverage with Indian cockle. Postmasters Jesse...

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the world, have pursued “the even tenor of their way,” content to have it said of them, as Christ said of the woman performing a deed of mercy – “They have done what they could.” It tells how that many in the pride and strength of young manhood left the plow and the anvil, the lawyer’s office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country’s call went forth valiantly “to do or die,” and how through their efforts the Union was restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. Genealogists will appreciate this volume from the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which would otherwise be inaccessible. Great...

Postmasters and Postal Service in Norwich Vermont

It was fifteen years after the admission of Vermont into the Federal Union, and forty years after the settlement of the town, before Norwich had a post office. The first post office was established at Norwich Plain, July 1, 1805, and Jacob Burton was appointed postmaster. Postmaster Burton kept the office in his harness shop on the main street of the village, nearly opposite the present residence of Mrs. William E. Lewis. Probably the duties of the office were not so great as to interfere much with the prosecution of his trade. It is doubtful if Mr. Burton had more than two mails per week to distribute, and these were much smaller in bulk than either of the three daily mails now received at the village office. It is certain that less mail matter was then handled here in the course of a year than now in a week, although the territory accommodated at the office and the population of the town itself were each considerably greater than at present. It is safe to say, moreover, that the people now living in Norwich receive more letters and miscellaneous mail matter every year than did all the 150,000 inhabitants of Vermont in the year 1805. The post office is essentially a modern institution, whose importance and value increases year by year with cheaper postage and the general diffusion of cheap printed matter among the people. At the time of the admission of Vermont into the Union, in 1791, there were only five post offices in the State (at Brattleboro, Windsor, and Newbury on the Connecticut River, and at Bennington and...

Biography of Horace Childs

Horace Childs, a pioneer railroad bridge builder in New England, is a prominent resident of Henniker, Merrimack County, N.H. He was born in this town, August 10, 1807, son of Solomon, Jr., and Mary (Long) Childs. He is a lineal descendant of William Childs or Child, a brother of Ephraim Child, who emigrated from England, and settled in Watertown, Mass., in 1630. The family, which was a notable one in England, sustained the dignity of a coat of arms. William Child was made a freeman at Watertown in 1634, and became a landowner there. His son John was conspicuous in the public affairs of Watertown. He died at the age of forty years. The third in this line was John Childs, Jr., son of John and Mary (Warren) Child; and the fourth, his son Jonathan, born in Watertown in 1696, who settled in Grafton, Mass., where he died in 1787, in the ninety-second year of his age. From the “Genealogy of the Child, Childs, and Childe Families,” by Elias Child, published in 1881, chapter viii., relating to the Watertown branch, we learn that Jonathan Child married in 1729 Abigail Parker, and had eight children, the eldest, Josiah, born in 1730, the youngest, Joseph, born in 1753. Ruth, born in 1740, and the sixth, Solomon, born January 31, 1744. The same record of Jonathan Child’s family is in the History of Grafton, Mass., except that the year of the birth of Solomon is there given as 1743. The History of Henniker names Solomon as the “son of Josiah and Ruth Childs .” If the foregoing record be correct, he was...

Biographical Sketch of Lyman W. Childs

Childs, Lyman W.; physician; born, Lee, Ill., Oct. 1, 1867; son of Charles and Ann Eliza Smith Childs; graduate, Illinois State Normal University, 1890, at Western Reserve Medical College, 1894, studied in University of Vienna, 1899-1900; married, Waterloo, Ia., 1902, Colene C. Hogg; issue, Evelyn L., Frances B., Eleanor M., Lyman W., Jr.; member sanitation committee, Chamber of Commerce, for three years; instrumental in introduction of medical inspection in Cleveland public schools; introduced first fresh air school in Cleveland in 1911; house physician, City Hospital, 1894; medical examiner, Cleveland Public Schools, 1910-1913; member Cleveland Medical Society and American Medical Ass’n;...

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