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Melungeons

The word, Melungeon, dates at least back to the late 1700s and has several interpretations. The most obvious is that it is frontier derivation of the French word, mélange, which means “blend.”

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

An Historical Sketch of the Tionontates or Dinondadies, now called Wyandots

The tribe which, from the time of Washington’s visit to the Ohio, in 1753, down to their removal to the West, played so important a part under the name of Wyandots, but who were previously known by a name which French write Tionontates; and Dutch, Dinondadies, have a history not uneventful, and worthy of being traced clearly to distinguish them from the Hurons or Wyandots proper, of whom they absorbed one remnant, leaving what were later only a few families near Quebec, to represent the more powerful nation.

Seneca County New York Biographies

In the 1980’s a series of newsletters were published four times a year by Seneca County NY featuring historical information concerning Seneca county and her past residents. The current historian for Seneca County placed these online using PDF files. One of the main features of each edition were biographical sketches of early settlers of Seneca County. Unfortunately, while they provided an index inside of a spreadsheet for the 189 biographies, it is difficult for the average user to quickly get around. I’ve taken their spreadsheet and linked each edition to the PDF file. Once you’ve found the biography you want, click on the newsletter edition and then browse the pages until you find the specific biography you were looking for. This should help you find these wonderful biographies a little easier. SurnameGivenNewsletter Edition AckleyBenjaminSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4 AckleyJacobSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4 AckleySamuelSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4 AckleySamuel J.Seneca County History newsletter Vol. 3 No. 3 AlexanderWilliam H.Seneca County History newsletter Vol. 4 No. 2 AllenSilasSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 AlmySamuelSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 4 No. 1 ArmstrongJohnSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 3 No. 1 BachmanJosephSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 2, No. 1 BaileyEbenezerSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 2, No. 4 BaileyGeorge & SamuelSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgeJohnSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgeMahlonSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgePeterSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgeSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BaldwinJonas C.Seneca County History newsletter Vol. 2, No. 2 BangsAbnerSeneca County History...

Narrative of Marie Le Roy and Barbara Leininger

The Narrative of Mary le Roy and Barbara Leininger. Who for four and a half years were captive among the Indians, and on the 6th May 1759 arrived happy in this city. From her own lips never written and promoted to the Press. This manuscript gives an account of the captivity and escape of these two girls, whose families lived on Penn’s Creek, in the present Union County, Pennsylvania. It also provides a lengthy list of names of other prisoners met by the two ladies in their captivity.

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George A. Godsmark, George Wigent, Daniel Place, John J. DeWitt, Jay Henderson, William H. Barr, Josephus Sanborn, John C. Thomas, Michael Hamill, William Mitchell, Henry Thrall, William Motter, George Upright, Thomas J. Hitchcock, Asa Goodrich, Charles Albright, George Hoag, David Wise,...

Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

Biography of Frank H. Chapman

Frank H. Chapman, a leading druggist of Franklin Falls, was born in Lowell, Mass., May 29, 1848, son of Eben L. Chapman, of New Market, N.H. The father, who was born in 1807, removed to Lawrence, Mass., and was there a successful grocer for forty-one years, retiring from active business in 1860. He married for his first wife a Towle, of New Market, who died leaving no children. For his second wife he married Mrs. Martha J. Hilton Hanscomb, and their children were: Frank H., the subject of this sketch; and Charles, who died at the age of six years. Frank H. Chapman received his education in the common and high schools of Lawrence, Mass. In 1864 he entered the employ of H. M. Whitney, a druggist, to learn the business, remaining there for five years. Afterward, in Brooklyn, N.Y., he was employed in the store of Emil Heydenreich & Co. for three years. In 1875 he came to Franklin Falls, and purchased the drug store of E. H. Sturtevant, whom he succeeded in the business, continuing alone until 1893, when he sold one-half interest to Charles Eddy. The store is now carried on under the style of F. H. Chapman & Co. They have a full line of drugs, medicines, etc., and have succeeded in building up a large and successful business. Mr. Chapman now leaves the entire charge of the store to his partner, Mr. Eddy. He is also connected with the well-known wholesale druggists, Rust & Richardson, of Hanover Street, Boston, Mass. At one time he was the President of the New Hampshire Pharmaceutical Association. In...

Biography of Stephen Chapman

Stephen Chapman, of England, came to America when he was only fifteen years of age. When the revolution began he joined the American army under Washington, and fought throughout the whole war. After the close of the war, he married Eliza Floyd, of Virginia, by whom he had Frank, George, William, James, John, Andrew, Isaiah, Benjamin, Rachel, and Peggy. Frank was a soldier in the war of 1812. He married Nancy Chester, of Virginia, whose father, Dr. Stephen Chester, was a surgeon in the American army during the revolution. Their children were Sally, Polly A., John W., James B., and Wesley. James B. married Susan Fipps, of Virginia, and settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., in 1838. Mr. Chapman was a cabinet maker by trade, and before he left his home, in Virginia, he made the coffins for the parents of General Joseph E. Johnston, who became so celebrated during the late war between the North and South. After he came to Missouri Mr. Chapman took up the carpenter’s trade, and became one of the most rapid workmen in his part of the country. He possessed great powers of endurance, and on one occasion, while building a house for George Britt, he worked sixty hours without stopping, for which he received $25 in gold. When he first came to Montgomery County there were no roads through the prairies, and the grass was nearly as high as his horse’s back. When he traveled anywhere he would tie a small log to his horse’s tail, and drag it through the grass, so it would make a trail he could follow back home....

Biographical Sketch of James L. Chapman

James L. Chapman is a native of West Virginia, born near Manchester, Hancock County, in the widely quoted “Pan-handle district,” March 23, 1818, and there he was reared, educated, and lived until the 5th of April, 1854. In that year he migrated to the “land of the Hawkeye,” settling in Jefferson county, but remained in that county only till the following fall, then removed to Wayne county, Iowa, and there continued to live and engage in farming until 1864, when he made his home in Missouri, locating in Harrison county. Six years he pursued farming avocations in that county, then removed to Daviess county and settled in Salem township, where he farmed until 1876, and then engaged in the mercantile and hotel business, at Coffeysburg, with his son, William A., under the firm name of Chapman & Son, continuing the business until 1880, when they sold out and came to Gallatin and engaged in the hotel business, for six months, then dissolved partnership. Mr. Chapman then purchased his present fruit farm on the southern limits of Gallatin, where he is engaged in the growing and cultivating of the excellent fruits indigenous to the soil of Daviess county, having made fruit culture a study since early boyhood. He has one hundred and eleven apple trees, two hundred peach trees, two cherry trees, thirty pear trees, beside strawberries, gooseberries, and one acre in Concord grapes. Mr. Chapman was united in matrimony, on the 10th of May, 1849, to Miss Nancy J. Daugherty, of Pennsylvania. They became the parents of six children; named, respectively, William A., now residing in Kansas; Francis M.,...
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