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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Leroy Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Albertsen, Albert. P. O. Audubon, R. 2. R. 274.63 ac., sec. 1. (16.) Owner, Edwin F. Johnson. Anderson, A. R. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 360 ac., sec. 25. (33.) Anderson, Chris. Wf. Christina; ch. Christina, Lauritz, Amelia, Iler, Alfred, Samuel and Clarence. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 80 ac., sec. 26. (8.) Anderson, Jens C. Wf. Marie; ch. A. H. C., Carrie, Dagmar, Samuel, Dorcas and Theodora. P. O. Audubon, R. 6. O. 240 ac., sec. 19, and in Sharon Twp., O. 80 ac. (40.) Anderson, L. J. Wf. Mary; ch. Edwin, Esther, Elvia, Edna and Raymond. P. O. Audubon, R. 6. O. 323.04 ac., sec. 7. (38.) Andreasen, A. M. P. O. Audubon, R. 1. R. 154 ac., sec. 17. (32.) Owner, Jens Andreasen. Andreasen, Marius. Wf. Dagna. P. O. Audubon, R. 1. R. 154 ac., sec. 17. (25.) Owner, Jens Andreasen. Anthes, Emmit. Wf. Rose. P. O. Audubon, R. 2. R. 80 ac., sec. 12. (21.) Owner, Don J. Preston. Anthes, Oscar. Wf. Sarah; ch. Mildred and Fay. P. O. Audubon, R. 4. O. 80 ac., sec. 32. (10.) Bamsey, Ray. Wf. Alice; ch. Gertrude, Alice, Florence and Raymond. P. O. Audubon, R. 2. O. 80 ac., sec. 22. (28.) Barger, Lewis. Wf. Alice; ch. Eleanor, Paul, Herbert and Elizabeth. P. O. Audubon, R. 1. O. 160 ac., sec. 9. (30.) Bauer, Chris. Wf. Henrietta; ch. William. P. O. Ross. O. 1 1/2 ac., sec. 3. (39.) Blohm, Wm. Wf. Anna; ch. Leonard, Arlene and...

Claybank Cemetery Ozark Alabama

Margaret Claybank Cemetery is located about two miles from Ozark, Alabama on Ozark – Daleville Highway. This cemetery enumeration was performed in 1948 by Eustus Hayes and as such will provide details on headstones which may no longer be present in the cemetery. Lizzie E. Dowling June 25, 1853 – Oct 31, 1938. Wife of N. B. Dowling. N. B. Dowling Aug 15, 1853 – Mar 28, 1938. Hus of Lizzie E. Dowling. Leila Belle Dowling May 26, 1876 – Jan 14, 1933. Dau of S. L. & Sarah Jane Dowling. Samuel L. Dowling Nov 3, 1841 – Jan 15, 1919. Sarah Jane Windham Feb 22, 1839 – June 15, 1925. Wife of Samuel L. Dowling. Rev. John Dowling July 20, 1818 – Feb 28, 1900. Son of Rev. Dempsey Dowling. Charlotte Dowling Oct 20, 1888 -. Wife of Rev. John Dowling Sr. Erin Elizabeth Dowling Feb 10, 1902 – Sep 11, 1902 Inf. Dau of R.Y. & Melissa Dowling. Pauline Dowling Feb 13, 1897 June 24, 1899 Inf. Dau of RY & Melissa Dowling. Alonzo G. Dowling Dec 26, 1888 June 16, 1922. F. Melissa Prigden July 1, 1866 Apr 18, 1943. Wife of R.Y. Dowling. Robert Y. Dowling June 14, 1865 Aug 30, 1924. J. B. Dowling July 16, 1903 Oct 20, 1928. Sarah E. Thomas Feb 23, 1839 – Sep 10, 1917. Wife of F.M. Prigden. F.M. Prigden Apr 10, 1838 – Feb 21, 1908. Jefferson Dowling May 6, 1848 – Mar 12, 1887. Margaret Dowling Oct 7, 1850 – Aug 16, 1887. Wife of Jefferson Dowling. Nellie Parker July 16, 1855 – Nov 2, 1887....

Moravian Massacre at Gnadenbrutten

In the early part of the year 1763 two Moravian missionaries, Post and Heckewelder, established a mission among the Tuscarawa Indians, and in a few years they had three nourishing missionary stations, viz: Shoenbrun, Gnadenbrutten and Salem, which were about five miles apart and fifty miles west of the present town of Steubenville, Ohio. During our Revolutionary War their position being midway between the hostile Indians (allies of the British) on the Sandusky River, and our frontier settlements, and therefore on the direct route of the war parties of both the British Indian allies and the frontier settlers, they were occasionally forced to give food and shelter to both, which aroused the jealousy of both the Indian allies of the English and the American frontiersmen, although they preserved the strictest neutrality. In February 1772, the American settlers (nothing more could be expected) assumed to believe that the Moravian, or Christian Indians; as they were called, harbored the hostile Indians; therefore they pronounced them enemies, and at once doomed them to destruction. Accordingly on the following march, ninety volunteers, under the leadership of one David Williamson, started for Gnadenbrutten where they arrived on the morning of the 8th, and at once surrounded and entered the station; but found the most of the Indians in a field gathering corn. They told them they had come in peace and friendship, and with a proposition to move them from their unpleasant and dangerous position between the two hostile races to Fort Pitt for their better protection. The unsuspecting Indians, delighted at the suggestion of their removal to a safer place, gave up their few...

Massacre at Howard’s Well and Other Depredations – Indian Wars

Closely following the outbreak of the Cherokees and half -breed renegades at Whitemore‘s, Barren Fork, came on attack by a similar party of Indians, half breeds, and Mexicans combined, on a train of supplies, en route to Fort Stockton, at Howard’s Well, near old Fort Lancaster. The facts of this one of the most inhuman massacres in history were reported to the “War Department, by Col. Merritt, through General Angua, under date of April 29th, 1872. We give the report as written: On the 20th inst, I arrived with the cavalry of my command at Howard’s Well, a few hours too late to prevent one of the most horrible massacres that has ever been perpetrated on this frontier. A Mexican train, loaded with United States commissary and ordinance stores, on its way from San Antonio to Fort Stockton, was attacked by Indians, plundered and burned. All the people with the train, seventeen souls in all, were killed or wounded, except one woman. My command buried eleven bodies, and brought three wounded men and one woman into this post. Before arriving at the burning train, the first intimation we had of the horrible disaster were the charred and blackened corpses of some of the poor victims, but no one was alive to tell the horrors of the affair. I supposed, up to this time, that Capt. Sheridan, with the infantry of my command was in camp at Howard’s Well, about a mile from the scene of the massacre, and while yet some distance from the point the smoke of the burning wagons, mistaken for his camp fires, confirmed me in this...

General History of the Western Indian Tribes 1851-1870 – Indian Wars

Up to 1851, the immense uninhabited plains east of the Rocky Mountains were admitted to be Indian Territory, and numerous tribes roamed from Texas and Mexico to the Northern boundary of the United States. Then came the discovery of gold in California, drawing a tide of emigration across this wide reservation, and it became necessary, by treaty with the Indians, to secure a broad highway to the Pacific shore. By these treaties the Indians were restricted to certain limits, but with the privilege of ranging, for hunting purposes, over the belt thus re-reserved as a route of travel. The United States, also, agreed to pay the Indians 850,000 per annum, for fifteen years, in consideration of this right. The boundaries assigned, by these treaties to the Cheyennes and Arrapahoes, included the greater part of the present Colorado Territory, while the Sioux and Crows were to occupy the land of the Powder River route. After a few years gold was discovered in Colorado, upon the Indian reservation, settlers poured in, and, after the lands were mostly taken up by them, another treaty was made, February 18th, 1861, to secure them in peaceful possession. By this compact the Indians relinquished a large tract of land, and agreed to confine themselves to a small district upon both sides of the Arkansas River and along the northern boundary of New Mexico; while the United States was to furnish them protection; pay an annuity of $30,000 to each tribe for fifteen years, and provide stock and agricultural implements for those who desired to adopt civilized modes of life. Until April, 1864, no disturbances had...

Biography of Frank Henry Carr

Frank Henry Carr, one of the patriotic men who periled his life in the cause of the Union during the late Civil War, now an enterprising mill-owner of West Hopkinton, was born in West Hopkinton, February 8, 1841, son of Thomas W. and Caroline (Connor) Carr. The grandfather, John Carr, removed from West Newbury, Mass., to Concord, N.H., where he kept an inn for a short time. From Concord he came to West Hopkinton about the year 1821, making his residence on a farm which had been presented to his wife by her brother, Thomas Williams. While a carriage-maker by trade, he had a natural aptitude for general mechanical work. One of the most cherished possessions of his grandson’s family to-day is an old ‘cello made by him in his leisure hours. In politics he was an ardent Whig. He died on the old farm at the age of seventy-five. His wife, Abigail, who survived him some years, attaining the age of eighty-six, was a magnificent specimen of New England womanhood, strong, energetic, and cheerful up to the day of her death. She left a lasting impression upon her grandchildren, then growing up about her. Mr. and Mrs. John Carr had a family of eight children-Anna, Eliza, Emma, Abigail, Almira, Helen, Samuel, and Thomas Williams. Thomas W. Carr spent his early life upon the farm. While quite a young man, he was a Captain of militia. Later he engaged in farming and lumbering. The latter business was carried on in a factory the beam of which was twenty-four inches square and seventy feet long, and much heavy timber was...

Biography of David Carr

David Carr was the son of Elijah Carr, first cousin of Paddy Carr and second cousin to Charles Weatherford, of Alabama, the latter being son of the great warrior and hero of Fort Mimms, while the former is well known in the history of his country. David Carr’s mother was one of the Grayson family, of high reputation among the Muskogees. The subject of our sketch was born in 1841, and educated at the neighborhood schools; but, his parents dying when he was still a boy, he was deprived of many chances of enlightenment. He married, when scarcely twenty-one years old, Angelina Grayson, an aunt to Captain G. W. Grayson. She died the following year, and David married her sister, Caroline, by whom he had three children, Israel, now aged twenty-one years, Emma and Liddie. David’s father was the owner of a large plantation and negroes near Fishertown, a part of which is now the property of Mr. William Fisher, but the war destroyed the value of the property, and David went on a small farm on North Fork known as the Hobulchehoma place, which he has since sold (in 1887) to Pilot Grayson. Mr. Carr entered politics through the doorway of the House of Warriors, filling an unexpired term to commence with, after which he went to the House of Kings by election for four years. He also occupied the honorable and highly responsible position of supreme judge for two terms, at different periods. During his last term an occurrence took place that has no parallel in the history of the Muskogees, and which, at the time, called...

Biographical Sketch of Robinson Carr

Robinson Carr, firm of Carr & Thomas, livery and feed stable, is a native of Otsego County, N. Y.; in 1853, came to Wisconsin; followed farming; in 1858, came to Burt County, Neb.; engaged in farming, which he continued till 1876, when he engaged in the livery business. He now owns twenty acres of timber land and property in...

Slave Narrative of Margrett Nickerson

Interviewer: Rachel A. Austin Person Interviewed: Margrett Nickerson Location: Jacksonville, Florida Age: 89-90 In her own vernacular, Margrett Nickerson was “born to William A. Carr, on his plantation near Jackson, Leon County, many years ago.” When questioned concerning her life on this plantation, she continues: “Now honey, it’s been so long ago, I don’ ‘meber ev’ything, but I will tell you whut I kin as near right as possible; I kin ‘member five uf Marse Carr’s chillun; Florida, Susan, ‘Lijah, Willie and Tom; cose Carr never ‘lowed us to have a piece of paper in our hands.” “Mr. Kilgo was de fust overseer I ‘member; I was big enough to tote meat an’ stuff frum de smokehouse to de kitchen and to tote water in and git wood for granny to cook de dinner and fur de sucklers who nu’sed de babies, an’ I carried dinners back to de hands.” “On dis plantation dere was ’bout a hunnerd head; cookin’ was done in de fireplace in iron pots and de meals was plenty of pea, greens, cornbread burnt co’n for coffee – often de marster bought some coffee fur us; we got water frum de open well. Jes ‘fore de big fun fiahed dey fotched my pa frum de bay whar he was makin’ salt; he had heard dem say ‘de Yankees is coming and wuz so glad.” “Dere wuz rice, cotton, co’n, tater fields to be tended to and cowhides to be tanned, thread to be spinned, and thread was made into ropes for plow lines.” “Ole Marse Carr fed us, but he did not care what an’...

Slave Narrative of Rose Adway

Interviewer: Mrs. Bernice Bowden Person Interviewed: Rose Adway Location: 405 W. Pullen, Pine Bluff, Arkansas Age: 76 Occupation: Farmed “I was born three years ‘fore surrender. That’s what my people told me. Born in Mississippi. Let me see what county I come out of. Smith County—that’s where I was bred and born. “I know I seen the Yankees but I didn’t know what they was. My mama and papa and all of ’em talked about the War. “My papa was a water toter in durin’ the War. No, he didn’t serve the army—just on the farm. “Mama was the cook for her missis in slavery times. “I think my folks went off after freedom and then come back. That was after they had done been sot free. I can remember dat all right. “I registered down here at the Welfare and I had to git my license from Mississippi and I didn’t remember which courthouse I got my license, but I sent letters over there till I got it up. I got all my papers now, but I ain’t never got no pension. “I been through so much I can’t git much in my remembrance, but I was here—that ain’t no joke—I been here. “My folks said their owners was all right. You know they was ’cause they come back. I remember dat all right. “I been farmin’ till I got disabled. After I married I went to farmin’. And I birthed fourteen head of chillun by dat one man! Fourteen head by dat one man! Stayed at home and took care of ’em till I got ’em up...
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