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Biography of Abraham Buford

ABRAHAM BUFORD. The name of this respected and much esteemed citizen is well and favorably known in Reynolds County, for he has been a resident of the same all his life, and his name has been intimately associated with the social, intellectual and financial growth of the county. His birth occurred on the three forks of Block River, in the east part of this county, May 1, 1840, and in this county he received his education and became familiar with the duties of farm life. His grandfather, William Buford, was a pioneer settler of Iron County, moving there from Kentucky as early as 1825, and there passed the remainder of his life engaged in farming. He was a prominent man in his neighborhood. Four sons and probably as many daughters were born to his marriage, John Buford, father of subject, being among the eldest. The latter was born in the Old Dominion, but was reared in Kentucky, whither his parents had moved. When a young man he came to Missouri, and was married in Iron County to Miss Elizabeth Davis, whose parents were early settlers of Iron County. She was born in Virginia, and died in this county, on Block River, where she and her husband had settled at an early day, and where they had reared their children. She was an excellent wife and mother. Mr. Buford followed the occupation of a farmer. He was a Democrat, and several times represented his county in the Legislature. As the years passed by he became wealthy, owing to his good management and business ability, and was surrounded by all the...

Slave Narrative of Lucindy Allison

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Lucindy Allison Location: Marked Tree, Arkansas (with children at Biscoe, Arkansas) Age: 61 “Ma was a slave in Arkansas. She said she helped grade a hill and help pile up a road between Wicksburg and Wynne. They couldn’t put the road over the hill, so they put all the slaves about to grade it down. They don’t use the road but it’s still there to show for itself. “She was a tall rawbony woman. Ma was a Hillis and pa’s name was Adam Hillis. He learned to trap in slavery and after freedom he followed that for a living. Ma was a sure ‘nough field hand. Mama had three sets of children. I don’t know how many she did have in all. I had eleven my own self. Grandma was named Tempy and I heard them tell about when she was sold. She and mama went together. They used to whoop the slaves when they didn’t work up peart. “When the ‘Old War’ come on and the Yankees come they took everything and the black men folks too. They come by right often. They would drive up at mealtime and come in and rake up every blessed thing was cooked. Have to go work scrape about and find something else to eat. What they keer ’bout you being white or black? Thing they was after was filling theirselves up. They done white folks worse than that. They burned their cribs and fences up and their houses too about if they got mad. Things didn’t suit them. If they wanted a colored man to...

Biography of Mrs. Jane Buford

Among the honored pioneer women of Oklahoma is numbered Mrs. Jane Buford, who resides in a beautiful home at No. 102 North Cherokee street in Bartlesville. She is a member of the Delaware tribe of Indians and during her infancy was brought by her parents to Indian Territory at an early period in its settlement. She acquired a thorough knowledge of the English language, in which she converses as fluently as in her native tongue, and as a young woman she was united in marriage to Jacob Wheeler, now deceased. They became the parents of three children: Lena, the eldest in the family, was accorded liberal educational advantages, attending the University at Muskogee and Haskell Institute at Lawrence, Kansas. She is the widow of Dennis Parker and the mother of three children, Geneva Blanche, Edward Job and Leona Marie, all of whom are attending school. Edward Wheeler, the second in order of birth, acquired his education in the schools of Fort Worth, Texas, and Chilocco, Oklahoma, and is still at home. Bryant, who was educated at Lawrence, Kansas, is deceased. All of the family have their allotments of land and receive royalties in oil. Following the demise of her first husband Mrs. Wheeler married Mr. Buford, who has also passed away. Previous to establishing her home in Bartlesville she resided on a large farm within a few miles of the town. Practically her entire life has been passed in this state and she remembers the time when the Indians far outnumbered the white settlers and the land was wild and undeveloped, its rich resources being then undreamed of. She...

Biography of Robert Britton Buford

The present mayor of Eufaula, Dr. Robert Britton Buford, was for ten years engaged in the practice of dentistry here and he is now, in connection with his official duties, active in the conduct of the Indian Journal, of which paper he is editor and proprietor. A native of Texas, he was born in Sulphur Springs, on the 23d of April, 1879, a son of John C. and Elizabeth (Askew) Buford, the former a native of Texas and the latter of Georgia. On attaining manhood the father engaged in farming on his own account in Texas and he was active in that connection until his demise in 1920. He was but eighteen years of age when he enlisted in the Texas infantry under his father, Captain W. R. Buford, for service in the Civil war, and he participated in many of the most important battles of that conflict, serving the entire four years. After receiving his honorable discharge he returned to his native state and resided there until his death at the age of seventy-eight years. Mrs. Buford is still living and makes her home in Texas. Robert Britton Buford was reared and educated in Sulphur Springs, Texas, and after completing his preliminary education, enrolled in the dental department of the University of Tennessee at Nashville, graduating from that institution in 1902 with the D. D. S. degree. He immediately came to Eufaula and for ten years engaged in the practice of his chosen profession, achieving substantial success in that connection. In 1912 he purchased the Indian Journal, which was established forty-five years ago and is the oldest newspaper...

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