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Biographical Sketch of Timothy Bemis

Timothy Bemis, a native of Marlboro, Mass., came to Marlboro, N. H., in 1776. His son James, a commissioned officer in the Revolutionary war, married Hannah Frost, who bore him nine children, only one of whom is now living, and settled in Dublin. His son Josiah married Sibyl Emery, of Jaffrey, and had born to him three children, only two of whom are now living. His son. Alvin J., married Mary Greenwood, of Marlboro, N. H., who bore him two children, neither of whom is now living. He resides on road 35, in the village of East...

Biographical Sketch of James Bemis

James Bemis, from Weston, Mass., settled in Dublin in 1793, where he died December 15, 1832, aged seventy-five years. He married first Hannah Frost, of Marlboro, by whom he had one son, Jonathan. He next married Lois Walker, of Sudbury. Mass., in 1786. His children were Hannah, James, Lois, Thomas, Josiah, Betsey, Eli and Mercy. James Bemis was a soldier of the Revolution, enlisting when a boy of eighteen, and reached headquarters just before the battle of Bunker Hill. His son Thomas, born in 1793, married first Sally Williams, and second Anna Knight, of Sudbury, Mass. His children were Sally, Elbridge G., Elizabeth J., George W., and Samuel Dana. He died at...

Biographical Sketch of Samuel D. Bemis

Samuel D. Bemis, son of Thomas, was born February 8, 1833, He has been engaged in farming, and has held the office of selectman, being chairman of the board from 1872 to 1884. He was a member of the state legislature in 1872, and a delegate to the constitutional convention in...

Biography of Amos W. Bemis

Amos W. Bemis, living two and one-half miles west of San Bernardino, on Fifth Street, is one of the early and successful pioneers of this county. He was born in Jefferson County, New York, and is a son of Alvin Bemis, who with his family removed to Ohio when Amos was eight years of age. In 1844 he removed to Lee County, Iowa, where he died in 1847. The family lived in Lee County three years after Mr. Bemis’ death, and in 1851 the mother, seven sons and three daughters, started for California. Amos being the eldest the others naturally looked to him, and on his shoulders rested the greater responsibility. They spent two winters in Ogden, Utah. In 1853 he married Miss Julia McCullough, a native of New York State. Her father, Levi McCullough, moved from Erie County, New York, to Michigan, in 1836. He was therefore a pioneer of that State, and was a citizen of Jackson when it could boast of one store, one mill and a few small houses. In 1846 he left there for Iowa. At this time the Mexican war came on and he entered the service as a volunteer and served until the close. He then joined his family in Iowa, and almost immediately set out for Ogden, Utah, arriving there in 1852, and there it was that Mr. Bemis met and married his daughter. They started across the plains March 20, 1853, and June 5, of the same year, they arrived in San Bernardino County. He first bought ten acres of land; he now owns a fine farm of 200 acres....

Biography of Joseph Hancock

Joseph Hancock, a rancher near San Bernardino, was born near Cleveland, Ohio, in 1822, and is the son of Solomon and Alta (Adams) Hancock, natives of Massachusetts and Vermont respectively. His father was born in 1793, and his mother in 1795, and were of English descent. The great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence.1 His paternal great-grandmother was the daughter of General Ward. Solomon Hancock was a frontiersman in the Buckeye State, a farmer, but in his early days spent much time in hunting deer and wild turkey, with which the country abounded. His father, Thomas Hancock, entered the Revolutionary War at the age of fourteen years. When the subject of this sketch was a lad of ten years his father moved to Clay County, Missouri, where he lived for three years. There they had some pretty “tough times.” Mr. Hancock gave his shoes to another boy while he rode on the back of an ox to get along. This was in 1833. Four years later his father moved with his family to Adams County, Illinois, where he lived for three years, and then moved to Hancock County, Illinois, and remained there nine years. In 1846 he left Illinois for Council Bluffs, Iowa, where he lived until 1851, when he set out for the Utah country. While crossing the Missouri, Mr. Hancock and his wife and two children narrowly escaped drowning. He had just been assisting to “ferry across” several families successfully, but in crossing this time a large tree came floating down stream. Captain Day insisted on trying...

Benjamin Boman Bemis

1. BENJAMIN BOMAN BEMIS, son of Benj. and Sarah Bemis,* b. Feb. 14, 1763, in Spencer, Vt.; m. first, , Abigail Hall, dau. of Thomas and Huldah (Park) Hall, b. Dec. 9, 1763, and d. March 26, 1814. After living a few years in Spencer, Vt., they settled in Cornish where he lived many years. He m. second, , Sarah . He d. July 17, 1830, in Northfield, Vt. Children, all by first wife: i. SARAH, b. Sept. 3, 1783, in Spencer, Vt.; m. Aug. 23, 1806, Enos Child of Cornish; rem. to Bethel, Vt., in 1812, where they spent the rest of their lives. Ten children: ii. HULDAH, b. Dec. 24, 1755, in Spencer, Vt.; m. Sept. 4, 1809, Ishmael Tuxbury. They lived in Cornish Several years. Had eight children. (See Tuxbury.) She d. June 13, 1870. Mr. Tuxbury was b. March 12, 1782, and d. in Cornish June 15, 1867. iii. ASAPH STEBBINS, b. March 12, 1788, in Spencer, Vt.; d. Nov. 25, 1823. iv. JOSHUA B., b. Feb. 16, 1790, in Spencer, Vt.; d. July 28, 1803. v. BEND. B., b. March 14, 1792, in Cornish. vi. PERSIS, b. Sept. 6, 1794, in Cornish; m. . Went to Helena, Ark., in 1825, to reside. vii. CATHARINE, b. July 28, 1796, in Cornish; d. Oct. 2, 1797. viii. FRANKLIN, b. July 26, 1798, in Cornish; d. Aug. 2, 1803. ix. ABIGAIL, b. June 17, 1800, in Cornish; d. Aug. 6, 1803. x. TABITHA, b. Aug. 18, 1802, in Cornish; d. Aug. 8, 1803. xi. THOMAS HALL, b. Jan. 23, 1808; m. June 24, 1832, Eliza Miller of...

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