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Brookfield Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Brookfield Massachusetts.

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

Muster Roll of Captain Henry Bailey’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain Henry Bailey’s Company of Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier from the fifth day of March, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Calais Maine, to the sixth day of April, 1839, when discharged or mustered. Captain Henry Bailey. Lieutenant John A. Brown. Ensign William Worster. Sergeants Pickering Patten. Zenas Wheeler. Curtis Merritt. John Church. Corporals Moses Worster, Jr. Joshua W. Norton. Nathan G. Peasley. Amos Whitten. Musicians. Archibald Smith. James P. Lawrence. Privates Allen, Joseph S. Bagley, James. Beal, William D. Caler, John B. Caligan, Humphrey. Chandler, Barnabas S. Church, George W. Connery, John. Cotton, William. Crowley, Nathaniel. Cummings, Amos. Cummings, Samuel B. Cummings, William B. Dorr, John F. Dorr, Joseph P. Dorr, Leonard W. Dorr, Moses W. Dorr, Richard B. Farr, James. Farnsworth, George. Foster, William. Grant, Ephram. Grant, James D. Holmes, William. Jacques, William. Knowlton, Joel. Leighton, James. Low, Lehi. McCarthy, Charles. McCaslin, Amaziah N. McCaslin, Stephen J. McKinsey, Joseph D. McLure, James. Newingham, Nicholas. O’Brien, Matthew. Peabody, Joshua. Pickett, James. Plummer, Fellars. Reynolds, James. Richardson, Enoch. Sinclair, William. Skinner, Justin. Small, Elbridge G. W. Smith, Moses. Smith, Russell. Steward, Temple C. Tabberts, Jeremiah. Tabberts, John 2d. Tabberts, Otis. Tabberts, Samuel H. Tinney, Otis. Tucker, John. Turner, Patrick. Whitney, Asa B. Willey, Amos P. Woodward, Thomas. Worster, Isaac Jr. Worster, John Jr. Worster, Mark. Wright,...

Ancestors of Warren A. Reed of Brockton Massachusetts

The Reed family of Brockton, Mass., a leading member of which was Judge Warren A. Reed, lawyer and jurist, who for over a third of a century had been one of the foremost citizens of Brockton, and during the greater part of that long period connected with the judicial, civic and financial interests of the city, district and State, is one of long and honorable standing in this Commonwealth, and one the forerunner of which came to these shores over two hundred and fifty years ago. Many members of this historic family have given good account of themselves, and many are there who have been prominent in the history of this country. An account of the branch of the family to which Judge Reed belongs is here given in chronological order, beginning with the earliest American ancestor.

Beal Genealogy – Beals Genealogy

This manuscript provides a look into some of the descendants of John Beal of Hingham, Massachusetts. John Beal, immigrant ancestor, came from the parish of Hingham, County Norfolk, England, to Hingham, Massachusetts, with his wife and five sons, three daughters and two servants. This fact is stated in many words on the town clerk’s record by Daniel Cushing, fourth town clerk of Hingham. He was born in Hingham, England, or vicinity. John Beal John Beal, immigrant ancestor, came from the parish of Hingham, County Norfolk, England, to Hingham, Massachusetts, with his wife and five sons, three daughters and two servants. This fact is stated in many words on the town clerk’s record by Daniel Cushing, fourth town clerk of Hingham. He was born in Hingham, England, or vicinity. He had a grant of land at Hingham, Mass., September 18th, 1638, six acres for a house lot on what is now South Street. He was a shoemaker. He was admitted a freeman in 1639 and was deputy to the General Court in 1640 and 1659. He married (first) Nazareth Hobart, born in England about 1600, died at Hingham, Mass., 23 September, 1658, daughter of Edmund and Margaret (Dewey) Hobart. He married (second) 10 March, 1659, Mary Jacob, widow of Nicholas Jacob, who died at Hingham, 15 June, 1681. In noticing his death, David Hobart, son of Rev. Peter Hobart, made full record “April 1, 1688, my uncle John Beal died suddenly.” Judge Sewell also made record on the same date, “Father Beal of Hingham died aged one hundred years.” His will was dated Sept. 27, 1687, and bequeathed to his...

Biography of Alonzo Beal

Few men have prospered in a greater degree than Alonzo Beal of Shawnee County. He came to Kansas when a boy, had a varied routine of experiences as a farm laborer, renter, western cowboy, and finally settled down to a carser which had brought him to a place where he is one of the largest land owners and cattlemen operators in this section of Kansas. He was born near Newtown in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, November 20, 1862, one of ten children, seven of whom are still living. His parents were Harlan and Cynthia (Ashor) Beal. His father, who was a farmer, died in Ohio in 1867. The mother lived in Ohio until her death in 1895. Five years of age when his father died, Alonzo grew up on the home farm with his mother, and at an early age had to assume more than ordinary responsibilities. In fact he contributed his labors to the support of the household. He had only a district school education. While living in Ohio he learned that better wages were paid farm hands in the State of Iowa and at the age of seventeen he set his steps in that direction. For about a year he remained in Lucas and Chariton counties of Iowa. His sister, Mrs. Edward Mitchell, was at that time living about three miles west of North Topeka. On arriving in Kansas Alonzo Beal spent a season in working for Mr. Mitchell, and then began farming for himself. He rented a farm for one year, then spent six months in Nuckolls County, Nebraska, clerking in his brother’s store at Superior, and...

Slave Narrative of Emmett Beal

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Emmett Beal Age: 78 Location: Biscoe, Arkansas “I was born in Holloman County, Bolivar, Tennessee. Master Dr. Jim May owned my set er folks. He had two girls and two boys. I reckon he had a wife but I don’t recollect seeing her. Ma suckled me; William May with me. Ely and Seley and Susie was his children. “I churned for mama in slavery. She tied a cloth around the top so no flies get in. I better hadn’t let no fly get in the churn. She take me out to a peach tree and learn me how to keep the flies outen the churn next time. “Mama was Dr. May’s cook. We et out the dishes but I don’t know how all of ’em done their eating. They eat at their houses. Dr. May had a good size bunch of hands, not a big crowd. We had straw beds. Made new ones every summer. In that country they didn’t ‘low you to beat yo’ hands up. I heard my folks say that more’n one time. “Dr. May come tole ’em it was freedom. They could get land and stay—all ‘at wanted to. All his old ones kept on wid him. They sharecropped and some of them got a third. I recollect him and worked for him. “The Ku Klux didn’t bother none of us. Dr. May wouldn’t ‘low them on his place. “Mama come out here in 1880. I figured there better land out here and I followed her in 1881. We paid our own ways. Seem like the owners ought to...

Biographical Sketch of Israel Beal

Israel Beal was born thirty-five miles west of Richmond, Virginia, April 10, 1849. His parents, Oliver and Elvira (Myes) Beal, were both natives of Virginia. His father died during the war, and his mother is still living, at a good old age, having reared a family of eleven children, nine of whom are still living. The subject of this sketch came to California via the Panama route in 1865, and worked for a mining company in Kern County for three years. He then went to Nevada and Arizona and mined, and then came back to California and worked for M. H. Crafts two years, and afterward rented land for two years. In 1877 he bought twenty acres in Lugonia; next he purchased seventeen and one-half adjoining this, and then ten acres in Redlands. The Redlands property has since been traded for twenty acres adjoining the original purchase. Mr. Beal has built a good house, improved his land and is one of the leading horticulturists in his neighborhood. In December, 1870, he was married to Miss Martha Embers, a native of California, and has had seven children: Oliver, Anna, who died in childhood; Newton, Harry, Clarence, who died in infancy; Charles A. and Morris. Mr. and Mrs. Beal are both members of the Congregational Church. Mr. Beal is an industrious man and a good citizen. He has made a good home and reared a respectable family, and although be was born a slave and the color of his skin is dark, no man in Redlands is more worthy of respect than Israel...

Biography of Albert M. Beal, M. D.

The technical education of the doctor of medicine avails him but little unless he has laid a foundation for it of broad general knowledge and made a careful study of human nature. When he took up the practice of medicine Doctor Albert M. Beal brought to the profession a mental equipment such as few men acquire in a lifetime. For years he had been an educator, teaching the common branches in the public schools and later specializing in college. Having as a student earned the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts, he later found opportunity to perfect his knowledge of law so that he was admitted to the bar after successfully passing the prescribed examination. With this preparation the mysteries of medicine and surgery were quickly mastered and success was his from the beginning of his professional career. Doctor Beal was born October 31, 1853, in Zuma Township, Rock Island County. His parents were Daniel N. and Betsy (Spencer) Beal, pioneers of the community. The son attended the country schools and later the public institutions of learning of Port Byron and Rock Island. At the age of seventeen he began teaching school at what is now Barstow. He entered Western College of Iowa when his preparatory studies had been completed, and graduated with the class of 1876, taking the degree of Bachelor of Arts. The following year he was principal of the Hampton, Illinois, schools. In 1879 he received the degree of Master of Arts from his alma mater, which was in that year removed to Toledo, Iowa. Mr. Beal at this time received a call...
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