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Biography of Alexander B. Baxter

Alexander Brown Baxter, chief of police, and Colonel of the 24th Battalion volunteer infantry, was born in the city of Edinburgh, Scotland, June 7, 1831, his parents being Alexander and Elizabeth (Hogg) Baxter. His father was Lieutenant in the 25th and 43rd infantry; served in the Light Division of the army (under the Duke of Wellington), in Spain; and twice in the invasion of France, in the Netherlands and Ireland, and was rewarded with a medal for his services. He retired on half pay after the battle of Waterloo, but was subsequently appointed second oldest Captain of the Venezuela regiment of Horse Lancers, raised in Holland for service in South America, yet did not serve. In 1835, he brought his family to Canada; had granted to him lands on the river St. Clair and at Chatham; served in the rebellion of 1837 ’38, commanding the Bear Creek Rifles, and died in Chatham in 1871, aged eighty-one years. He married Elizabeth Hogg, of Jedburgh, Roxburgshire, Scotland, and a relative of the “Ettrick Shepherd.” One of his ancestors once owned the property, afterwards purchased by Sir Walter Scott, and named Abbottsford, so called because at an earlier period the Abbotts of Melrose Abbey there had a ford across the Tweed. Col. Baxter received a common school education while the family were residing on the St. Clair river; clerked in a dry goods store in Chatham until 1851, when he went into business for himself, and has traded off and on until a recent date. He was a school trustee at one period, and part of that time chairman of the board,...

Biography of Jacob Baxter, M. D., M. P. P.

Jacob Baxter, who has represented Haldimand in the Provincial Legislature since the Dominion was formed, is a son of Jacob and Susan (Hershey) Baxter, both natives of Canada, and was born in the Township of Bertie, County of Welland, June 6, 1832. He is a grandson of John Baxter, who emigrated from Ireland near the close of the 18th century, settled in Bertie, and was a captain in the war of 1812-14, being in the battle of Fort Erie, and other engagements. The wounded at Fort Erie were taken to the barn of Captain Baxter, four miles away, to have their wounds dressed. Jacob Baxter, senior, was a former Reeve of the Township of Bertie, a man of considerable local influence, and a leader in agricultural matters, establishing the first agricultural society in that township, and dying in 1855. Our subject was educated in common and select schools, and by private tuition; studied his profession at the Toronto School of Medicine; became a licentiate of the Provincial Medical Board in 1853; the following winter attended a course of lectures in the Medical Department of the University of New York, and in 1866, a course at the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, same city, receiving the degree of M.D. from both institutions. Dr. Baxter has been in practice in Cayuga for a quarter of a century, and enjoys a high reputation for skill, both as a physician and Surgeon, is surgeon to the County Jail, and is also Surgeon to the 37th Battalion Haldimand Rifles. He holds likewise the office of Justice of the Peace. At the formation of the union...

Biographical Sketch of J. F. Baxter

J. F. Baxter, station agent and conductor, was born at Sidney Plain, N.Y., in 1833; moved to Rockford, Ill., in 1851 and engaged in mercantile business. In 1861 he moved to Wheatland, Ia.; thence to Marshalltown, in 1874, and in September, 1879, came to Sac City and took charge of the depot. He makes two trips a day as conductor, and during his absence the depot is charge of Frank L. Stayner, operator. Mr. Baxter is agent for the American express...

Slave Narrative of Katie Arbery

Interviewer: Mrs. Bernice Bowden Person Interviewed: Katie Arbery Location: 815 W. Thirteenth, Pine Bluff, Arkansas Age: 80 “I am eighty years old. My name ‘fore I was a Arbery was Baxter. My mother was a Baxter. Born in Union County. “My mother’s first people was Baxter and my grandmother was a Baxter and they just went by that name; she never did change her name. “The boss man—that was what they called our master—his name was Paul McCall. He was married twice. His oldest son was Jim McCall. He was in the War. Yes ma’am, the Civil War. “Paul McCall raised me up with his chillun and I never did call him master, just called him pappy, and Jim McCall, I called him brother Jim. Just raised us all up there in the yard. My grandmother was the cook. “There wasn’t no fightin’ in Union County but I ‘member when the Yankees was goin’ through and singin’ ‘The Union forever, hurrah, boys, hurrah We’ll rally ’round the flag, boys, Shouting the battle cry of freedom.’ (She sang this—ed.) And I ‘member this one good: ‘Old buckwheat cakes and good strong butter To make your lips go flip, flip, flutter. Look away, look away, look away, Dixie land.’ “Pappy used to play that on his fiddle and have us chillun tryin’ to dance. Used to call us chillun and say, ‘You little devils, come up here and dance’ and have us marchin’. “My cousin used to be a quill blower. Brother Jim would cut fishin’ canes and plat ’em together—they called ’em a pack—five in a row, just like my...

Biography of Edson Baxter

Edson Baxter. Now serving as clerk of the District Court at Marion, Captain Baxter is an old timer of Kansas and had lived in close touch with the developments of half a century and his own part therein allows him to speak with authority on the history of that period. The Baxter family came to Kansas in territorial times and did their pioneering in Morris County. Edson Baxter was fifteen years of age when he accompanied the family caravan overland, and he was able to make himself useful from the very beginning of the settlement. He was born on a farm in Lasalle County, Illinois, October 8, 1842, a son of June and Elizabeth (Lenox) Baxter. He is a descendant of the noted English divine, Richard Baxter. June Baxter, his father, was born near West Point, New York, June 30, 1805. In early life he learned the trade of blacksmith, and from New York went to Illinois. In 1858 he brought his family with wagons and teams westward from Central Illinois and located on land which he pre-empted in Morris County, Kansas. The rest of his active years were spent there as a farmer, and he died May 20, 1890. When the Baxter family settled in Morris County the settlers lived chiefly along the creeks. Law and order were not securely established, and besides some Indian seares the population suffered to some extent from the civil warfare then raging in Kansas and afterward extended through the entire country. Not infrequently the Baxters lived on buffalo meat, since buffalo were still numerous in the country. June Baxter was married in...

Biography of James Baxter

Captain James Baxter, of Boise, is a native of England, his birth having occurred in Norwich. His parents were Frank and Mary (Gunn) Baxter, who came with their family to the United States when the Captain was very young. They resided near New York City for some years, and then removed to Paterson, New Jersey. The father was a horticulturist by occupation and successfully engaged in the cultivation of vegetables and flowers. Soon after his arrival in America he took steps toward becoming naturalized and was recognized as a valued and influential citizen. He served as county commissioner in New Jersey for a number of years, and was also county sheriff, in which positions he discharged his duties with signal ability. After a residence of thirty years in America, he died at the age of seventy-eight. His widow still survives him, and at the age of eighty-seven years is living in Paterson, New Jersey, where she has so long made her home. She was the mother of thirteen children, seven of whom grew to years of maturity and are still living. In the public schools of New York City James Baxter began his education, which he continued in Paterson. Subsequently he attended the school of mines at Columbia College, New York, and was graduated there as a mining engineer and metallurgist. He learned the machinist’s trade with the Rogers Locomotive Company, of Paterson, New Jersey. In 1856 he went to Chili and for three years was master mechanic for the Southern Railroad, of that country. In 1859 he returned to the United States and purchased a plantation in Mecklenburg...

Baxter, Rex D. – Obituary

Enterprise, Oregon Rex D. Baxter, of Dayton, Wash. died Nov. 16, 2006. He was 55. Mr. Baxter was born Oct. 15, 1951. He graduated from Enterprise High School. He was employed as a Fishery Biologist and worked for the Army Corps of Engineers in Walla Walla, Wash. He is survived by his wife Debbie, daughter Emily, son Steven, mother Marjorie M. Baxter of Enterprise, brothers Greg Baxter of Bend, Gary Baxter of Troutdale and Terence Baxter of Walla Walla, Wash. plus other relatives and friends. A memorial service will be held at Dayton, Wash. on Nov. 25, 2006. Wallowa County Chieftain, January 23,...

Baxter, Joan – Obituary

Enterprise, Oregon Joan W. Baxter of Troutdale died at the home of her daughter in Camas, Wash., on Jan. 13, 2006. She was 67. Survivors include her husband, Gary L. Baxter of Troutdale, sons Michael Baxter and his wife Becky of Sunnyvale, Calif., Glenn Baxter and his wife Marissa of Los Gatos, Calif., David Baxter of Baltimore, Md., Jeff Baxter of Kirkland, Wash., Brian Baxter of Dallas, Tex., daughters Amy and her husband Jeff Van de Water of Warner Robins, Ga., Heather and her husband John Aldrich of Camas, Wash., her mother-in-law Marjorie M. Baxter of Enterprise, six grandchildren and numerous other relatives. A memorial service will be held at Enterprise Christian Church Jan. 20 at 1 p.m. Wallowa County Chieftain, January 19,...

Baxter, Ida Gertrude Loney – Obituary

October 3 at 1321 Isaacs, Mrs. Ida Gertrude Baxter of 59 South Palouse aged 60. Wife of John A. Baxter of Walla Walla; mother of C. Richard Baxter of Walla Walla; sister of Sam Loney, W. D. Loney, Charles C. Loney and Mrs. C. L. Ramp all of Walla Walla; Mrs. Robert Potts of Sprague and Mrs. Katie Paul of Everett. Born April 21, 1878 at Ontario, Wellington County, Canada. Member of Christian Science Church. Member of Christian Science Church. Remains at Marshall, Calloway & Hennessey. Funeral notice later. [Interment Mountain View Cemetery] Walla Walla Union Bulletin, October 4, 1938 Contributed by: Shelli...

Baxter, Doris Arlene – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Doris Arlene Baxter, 76, of La Grande died Aug. 27 at a local care center. Viewing will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday at Loveland Funeral Home, 1508 Fourth St. The funeral will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday at the LDS Chapel in Union. Burial will follow at the Union Cemetery. Mrs. Baxter was born Jan. 13, 1930, to Lester and Mary Daggett in Minam. She graduated from Union High School, and on March 13, 1951, she married Bryce Wight Baxter in the Temple in Idaho Falls, Idaho. They raised their family in North Bend where she was a homemaker. She was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and enjoyed cooking, crochet and crafts. Survivors include children, Duane Baxter and Chris Baxter, both of La Grande, Reed Baxter and Trisha Baxter, both of Eugene, and Kevin and Blaine Baxter and Kathy Price, all of Salt Lake City; 23 grandchildren; 13 great-grandchildren; and two sisters, Donna Brodhead of North Powder and Blanche Hutchison of Walla Walla. Her husband died earlier. Memorials may be made to Grande Ronde Hospice or the LDS Family History Center in care of Loveland Chapel. The Observer Online, Obituaries for the week ending Sept. 2, 2006, Published: September 5,...
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