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Business Men of Northern Maine

The Northern Maine, its Points of Interest and its Representative Business Men manuscript provides historical sketches of the nine towns featured within it’s embrace, as well as biographical sketches of the businesses and the men and women who owned and ran those businesses found within the towns of Houlton, Presque Isle, Caribou, Ft. Fairfield, Danforth, Lincoln, Mattawamkeag, Winn, and Kingman.

1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Mary F., emp. H. S. & H., h. 16 East Main View the Complete Directory Surnames in the Town of Lakeville Massachusetts You will find the directory of Lakeville Massachusetts starts on page 161. Aldrich, Allen, Anderson, Ashley, Audet, Barnes, Barney, Barton, Bassett, Bennett, Benton, Best, Boman, Briggs, Brown, Bullock, Bump, Bumpus, Burgess, Canedy, Card, Carlin, Caswell, Chace, Clark, Clarke, Cole, Collins, Coombs, Cudworth, Cushman, Davis, Dean, DeMoranville, Dexter, Drake, Dushane, Ellers, Elmer, Elwell, Farmer, Farnham, Ford, Frades, Freeman, Frost, Gerrish, Gifford, Gilman, Gilpatrick, Godfrey, Grady, Griffith, Hackett, Hafford, Hale, Hall, Hammond, Harlow, Harrington, Harvey, Haskell, Haskins, Hayes, Haynes, Hinds, Hinkley, Hoard, Hoffman, Holloway, Horr, Horton, Morton, Howland, Johnson, Jones, Keith, Kelley, Kenney, Kinsley, Lang, Leach, Leonard, Letcher, Lincoln, Loner, Luther, Macomber, Mann, Manning, Marrah, McCulby, McDonald, McGowan, Moody, Morgan, Mosher, Murphy, Nelson, Nickerson, Norris, Orrall, Osborne, Parker, Parkhurst, Parris, Parry, Paun, Peirce, Perry, Phinney, Pickens, Pierce, Pittsley, Plummer, porter, Pratt, Quell, Ramsdell, Reed, Reynolds, Robbins, Robinson, Rogers, Russell, Sampson, Sanford, Sawyer, Scott, Seekell, Sharidan, Shaw, Shockley, Shove,...

1921 Farmers’ Directory of Oakfield Township

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Andersen, A. P. Wf. Maria; ch. Hilda, Bertha, Christ A. Christiansen. P. O. Atlantic, R. 2. O. 137.37 ac., sec. 19. (24.) Andersen Chris F. Wf. Mary. P. O. Atlantic, R. 6.R. 120 ac., sec. 33. (4.) Owner, John R. Heiken. Andersen, George. Wf. Laura: ch.Rubie. P. O.  Brayton, R. 1. R. 80 ac., sec. 22; R. 80 ac., sec. 23. (3.) Owner, N. P. Hoegh. Andersen, Hans. Wf. Elena; ch. Ellen, Holgar, Ethel, Ambrose, Esther, Dan, Annetta, Ruth and Viola. P. O. Atlantic, R. 2. R. 154 ac., sec. 30. (2.) Owner, John R. Heiken. Andersen, N. C. Wf. Mary; ch. Adolph, Elma, Frank, Edna, Eiler. P. O. Atlantic, R. 6. R. 240 ac., sec. 35. (4.) Owner, Wm. Hoegh. Andersen, Neal. Wf. Nina. P. O. Atlantic, R. 2. R. 135 ac., sec. 29. (3.) Owner, John R. Heiken. Andersen, N. P. Wf. Carrie; ch. Hans C., Matta C., Lydia M. P. O. Brayton, R. 1. O. 120 ac., sec., 11. (21.) Andersen, Robert L. Wf. Anna; ch.Rubiae, Dale, Verle. P. O. Brayton, R. 1. R. 120 ac., sec. 15. (13.) Owner, Mrs. John Johnson. Ashwell, Ralph. Wf. Mae; ch. Edna, Rex. P. O. Exira, R. 2. R. 160 ac., sec. 7. (2.) Owner, Frank Doonan. Beck, F. L. Wf. Anna; ch.Nels, Henry and Marine. P. O. Brayton, R. 1. O. 80 ac., sec. 1. (36.) Beck, L. L. Wf. Elma; ch. Harold and Leonard. P. O. Exira, R. 2. O. 80 ac., sec. 4. (34.) Breeder of Holstein Cattle....

1921 Farmers’ Directory of Hamlin Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Aagaard, Geo. Wf. Marie. P. O. Exira, R. 5. O. 160 ac., sec. 20. (2.5.) Aagaard, Hans.Wf.Inger; ch.Sena, Bertha, Emmert. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. O. 78 ac.. sec. 10; O.37 ac.,  sec. 15. (27.) Albertson, John. Wf. Esther. P. O. Exira. R. 120 ac., sec. 35. (5.) Owner, Jorgen Hansen. Andersen, A. H. Wf. Christena; A. Egidia and Alfred. P. O. Audubon, it. 4. O. 80 ac., sec. 18;O. 120 ac., sec. 17. (23.) Andersen, Andy. Wf. Alice. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. R. 272.48 ac., sec. 3. (15.) Owner, E. S. Gorder. Andersen, Chas. Wf. Charlotta; ch.Thamer, David, Margaret, Walter, Herman, Esther, Harold, Iner, Agnes and Augusta. P. O. Exira, R. 5. R. 160 ac., sec. 16. (3.) Owner, E. Dryden. Andersen, Chris N. Wf. Annie; ch. Andrew F. P. O. Exira, R. 5. O. 160 ac., sec. 19. (32.) Andersen, Hans, Wf. Hannah; A. Egdia, Ben, Theodore, llartha, Hilda and Harold. P. O. Exira, R. 5. O. 160 ac., sec. 26; O. 30 ac., sec. 23. (34.) Atkinson, Sam. Sister Mary. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1.O. 13 ac., sec. 10.(45.) Burr, H. W. Wf. Glee; ch.Emmert A. and Mary L. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. O. 40 ac., sec. 11; O. 80 ac., sec. 2. (36.) Campbell, F. E. Wf. Mabel; ch. Wm. F. and Louis G. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. O. 240 ac., sec. 13. (20.) Carroll, John D. Wf. Lola; ch. Loraine. P. O. Hamlin, Box 133. R. 160 ac., sec. 11. (2.) Owner....

Bartlett Family Genealogy

Typing on six onion skinned papers, Ralph Sylvester Bartlett presented his lineage in the early 1900’s. His Bartlett family were early pioneers in Kittery Maine in the section later known as Eliot Maine. Whether he ever meant to compile these pages into book form is left for you to interpret, but somebody did eventually compile the 6 pages they had of his family tree. We provide the entire 6 pages in digital format below the transcription.

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the world, have pursued “the even tenor of their way,” content to have it said of them, as Christ said of the woman performing a deed of mercy – “They have done what they could.” It tells how that many in the pride and strength of young manhood left the plow and the anvil, the lawyer’s office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country’s call went forth valiantly “to do or die,” and how through their efforts the Union was restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. Genealogists will appreciate this volume from the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which would otherwise be inaccessible. Great...

Seneca County New York Biographies

In the 1980’s a series of newsletters were published four times a year by Seneca County NY featuring historical information concerning Seneca county and her past residents. The current historian for Seneca County placed these online using PDF files. One of the main features of each edition were biographical sketches of early settlers of Seneca County. Unfortunately, while they provided an index inside of a spreadsheet for the 189 biographies, it is difficult for the average user to quickly get around. I’ve taken their spreadsheet and linked each edition to the PDF file. Once you’ve found the biography you want, click on the newsletter edition and then browse the pages until you find the specific biography you were looking for. This should help you find these wonderful biographies a little easier. SurnameGivenNewsletter Edition AckleyBenjaminSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4 AckleyJacobSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4 AckleySamuelSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4 AckleySamuel J.Seneca County History newsletter Vol. 3 No. 3 AlexanderWilliam H.Seneca County History newsletter Vol. 4 No. 2 AllenSilasSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 AlmySamuelSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 4 No. 1 ArmstrongJohnSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 3 No. 1 BachmanJosephSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 2, No. 1 BaileyEbenezerSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 2, No. 4 BaileyGeorge & SamuelSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgeJohnSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgeMahlonSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgePeterSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgeSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BaldwinJonas C.Seneca County History newsletter Vol. 2, No. 2 BangsAbnerSeneca County History...

Hutchinson Family of Norwich Vermont

Hutchinson is an old and numerous family in Norwich, as well as in other parts of the country. They were among the early settlers of Massachusetts and were in Lynn and Salem in that colony as early as 1628, or 1629. A descendant of these early colonists, named Abijah, who was a tailor, removed from Salem to Windham early in the eighteenth century. His son Samuel, born about 1719, in company with his son, John, came to Norwich in 1765. They cleared an island in the Connecticut River, opposite the present residency of John W. Loveland, and planted it with corn. In the fall of that year they returned to Connecticut, and in company with a younger son, Samuel, returned in the spring of 1766, and made a permanent settlement. The elder Samuel spent the remainder of his life in the town, and died February 8, 1809. His wife was Jemina Dunham; she died January 12, 1798. Besides the two sons named above, he had three daughters: Sarah, married Francis Smalley; Tabitha, married Jonathan Delano; Jerusha, married Nathan Roberts. They all died young,’ soon after marriage. Hutchinson, John, son of Samuel, was born in 1741, in Windham, Connecticut, and married Mary Wilson, who was born in Ashford, Connecticut, in August, 1744. He enlisted in the Continental Army, and died at Philadelphia, June 22, 1778. His widow afterwards married Solomon Strong. His children were: Jerome Hutchinson, see further; John Hutchinson, who removed to New York State, where he died; Lydia Hutchinson, who was probably the first child born in Norwich, married D. Hammond, of Thetford; Abigail Hutchinson, married Honorable John...

Migration of Families out of Norwich VT

At the first enumeration of the inhabitants of eastern Vermont, as made by the authority of New York in 1771, Norwich was found to be the most populous of all the towns of Windsor County, having forty families and 206 inhabitants. Windsor followed with 203, and Hartford was third with 190. The aggregate population of the county (ten towns reported) was then but 1,205, mostly confined to the first and second tiers of towns west of the Connecticut River. Twenty years later, in 1791, Hartland led all the towns of the county with 1,652 inhabitants, Woodstock and Windsor coming next with 1,605 and 1,542 respectively. Exceptional causes made the little town of Guilford (now numbering scarcely more than one thousand inhabitants), till after the year 1800, the most populous town in the state. In Norwich, the great falling off in the size of families in recent years is seen in the fact, that in the year 1800, the number of children of school age was 604, out of a total population of 1,486, while in 1880 with a nearly equal population (1,471) it was but 390. In the removal of large numbers of the native-born inhabitants by emigration, we must find the principal cause of the decline of our rural population. Preeminently is this true of Norwich. The outflow of people began very early and now for more than a century there has been one unbroken, living stream of emigration pouring over our borders. Several families that had first located here became, before the close of the Revolutionary War, the pioneer settlers of Royalton, Tunbridge, and Randolph. Some of...
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