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Narrative of the Escape of W. B. Thompson – Indian Captivities

John W. B. Thompson’s story of “captivity” is really a captive story about being attacked by Seminole Indians at the Cape Florida Lighthouse he manned with what appears to be his slave. Written by him to let his friends know that he was alive, though crippled, the letter to the editor of the Charleston (S. C.) Courier details the frightful event of 23 July 1836. The Seminole Indians who attacked him likely pillaged the premise for supplies as they were taking their families into the marsh around Cape Florida where they were attempting to hide from the forced migration of their tribe to Oklahoma.

A Brief History of Norwich University

In 1835, the American Literary, Scientific, and Military Academy became “Norwich University,” by virtue of an act of incorporation granted by the legislature of Vermont the previous year. Captain Alden Partridge remained at the head of the institution until 1843, and soon after sold the buildings and grounds to the Trustees of the University. There was one feature in the scheme of education established at Norwich University which honorably distinguished it from nearly all other similar institutions of its time in New England. From the first it was wholly free from sectarian influence. This principle was prominently set forth in its charter as drawn by its founder, Captain Partridge, which provided “that no rules, laws or regulations of a sectarian character, either in religion or politics, should be adopted or imposed; nor shall any student ever be questioned or controlled on account of his religious or political belief by the Board of Trustees or the Faculty of said institution, either directly or indirectly. ” In his prospectus of the University, declaring the principles upon which it was founded, Captain Partridge begins as follows: ”Everything of a sectarian character in religion is utterly excluded from its walls. The founders of this Institution, as well as the legislature of Vermont which granted the act of incorporation, believed that there was no natural or necessary connection between the propagation of sectarian dogmas, and education rightly understood. They believed that the great object of education should be to prepare youth in the best possible manner for the correct and efficient discharge of the great duties of life, in any situation in which fortune...

Electa R. Todd Alvord of California

ALVORD, Electa R. Todd7, (Bela6, Caleb5, Gideon4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) born Oct. 25, 1826, in Stockton, N. Y., died May 23, 1883, in California. She married Alvin Wesley Alvord, who was born Oct. 20, 1822, died Sept. 19, 1888. Children: I. Julius B., b. Nov. 10, 1849; he lives in Cedarville, Cal. II. Augusta Albina, b. Aug. 30, 1851, d. April 20, 1901. III. Jessie May, b. May 10,...

Biographical Sketch of Thomas M. Alvord

THOS. M. ALVORD. – Mr. Alvord was born in Homer, Courtland county, New York, February 26, 1832, and is the son of Sylvester and Lucy Hull Alvord. His grandfather was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, serving under General Washington, and took up a Donation claim on the present site of Homer, New York. His father was born on the place, and died in 1864. He resided at his birthplace until 1853, when with his brother, Henry S., he left New York on board the Prometheus, via Nicaragua, and on the Pacific side took the Cortez, arriving in San Francisco December 1, 1853. He then went to Calaveras county and followed mining for three and a half years, with fair success, and during the summers followed farming. In December, 1854, his brother returned to the East and visited the coast again in the summer of 1889. On the breaking out of the Frazer river excitement, he came north, but only remained a short time, returning to Olympia in December, 1858, and prospecting the county for a location. In February, 1859, he purchased the Donation claim of Moses Kirkland and wife. This consisted of 320 acres, to which he has since added, until now he owns 1,100 acres half a mile from the town of Kent. In 1884, he built his present beautiful home, and is now engaged in general farming and largely in the dairy business, shipping a large quantity of milk to Seattle, He has, unlike his neighbors, never entered into hop-raising. Mr. Alvord is Republican in politics, though not a politician, and never having held an office....

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