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Muster Roll of Captain Daniel W. Clark’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain Daniel W. Clark’s Company of Infantry, in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the sixth day of March, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Calais, Maine to the fifth day of April, 1839, when discharged or mustered.

Ancestors of Warren A. Reed of Brockton Massachusetts

The Reed family of Brockton, Mass., a leading member of which was Judge Warren A. Reed, lawyer and jurist, who for over a third of a century had been one of the foremost citizens of Brockton, and during the greater part of that long period connected with the judicial, civic and financial interests of the city, district and State, is one of long and honorable standing in this Commonwealth, and one the forerunner of which came to these shores over two hundred and fifty years ago. Many members of this historic family have given good account of themselves, and many are there who have been prominent in the history of this country. An account of the branch of the family to which Judge Reed belongs is here given in chronological order, beginning with the earliest American ancestor.

The Descendants of John H. Blackwell

The Descendants of John H. Blackwell is a 62 page manuscript typewritten on onion skinned paper by Julia Ann Blackwell Ketchum. In it Mrs. Blackwell provides the descendants of John H. Blackwell who was born in 1793 in Sumter County, South Carolina; he died between 1870-1880 and was buried at Boles Arkansas. He married in 1824 in Tennessee to Sarah ???. Sarah was born abt 1804 in Tennessee and died between 1851-1859. She was also buried at Boles Arkansas. John H. Blackwell married 2nd 1851-1859 to Malinda ???. Malinda was born abt 1810 in Kentucky, and was buried between 1861-1864 in Boles, Arkansas. John H. Blackwell married 3rd, in 1865, Nancy ???, born in 1822 in Missouri. Issue of John H. and Sarah Blackwell Ambrose Blackwell, b. 1825 in Tennessee. Anthony Blackwell, b. 1829 in Tennessee. Anderson Blackwell, b. 1832 in Tennessee. James Blackwell, b. 1838 in Boles, Arkansas. Moses Melton Blackwell, b. 1840 in Boles, Arkansas. Issue of John H. and Nancy Blackwell Laura I. Blackwell, b. 1866 at Boles, Arkansas. Read the entire manuscript Surnames found in the Descendants of John H. Blackwell The following list of surnames can be found within the manuscript and have at least 1 family unit listed. There are many other surnames in this manuscript then just these (there’s an index at the back of the book) and researchers who had family in Boles Arkansas may want to peruse the manuscript to see if one of their ancestors is listed. Alley, Backwell, Bailey, Britt, Brown, Ellis, Freeman, Geiger, Graf, Hubbard, Ivey, Jones, Knight, Lance, Lawson, Manus, McCullah, Morgan, Parker, Rogers, Ruth, Seale,...

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. John R. Alley

(See Grant, Downing, Ghigau and Ross) Clara Eva, daughter of Edward Daniel and Elizabeth Henryetta (Musgrove) Hicks, was born in Tahlequah on February 10, 1890. She was educated in the Female Seminary, from which she graduated. She married at Claremore Aug. 15, 1908, John Reed, son of Frederick and Sarah Dameron Alley, born Sept. 26, 1873, Yell County, Ark. They are the parents of Lawrence Alley, born May 21, 1910. Mr. Alley is a contractor in Oklahoma City, and a member of the Masonic fraernity. They are members of the Presbyterian Church. Francis Marion Mushgrove married Clara Eva Alberty, and they were the parents Mrs. Edward Daniel Hicks. Daniel Ross Hicks married Nancy Jane Rider, and they were the parents of Edward Daniel Hicks. Mrs. James K. Blake graduated from the female Seminary May 31, 1906. Henry Clay Meigs, father of Mrs. Blake, was elected clerk of Illinois District in 1893, and Judge he same District in...

Biographical Sketch of Alley, John B.

Alley, John B., son of John and Mercy (Buffum) Alley, was born in Lynn, January 7, 1817. He belongs to one of the oldest Essex county families, and is descended from Hugh Alley, who, with his brother John, settled in Lynn in 1834. He received his education in the public schools of his native town, and at the age of fourteen was apprenticed to a shoe manufacturer, and at nineteen received the gift of his time. Soon after the close of his apprenticeship he went to Cincinnati and there purchased a flatboat, which he loaded with merchandise and carried to New Orleans, and the success of this enterprise laid the foundation of his fortune. At the age of twenty-one he returned to Lynn and began the manufacture of shoes. In five years, at the age of twenty-six, he was the owner of one of the largest enterprises in a city full of active, shrewd men with whom he had entered on a race for wealthy. In 1847 he established a house in Boston for the sale of hides and leather. At various times he has been the senior partner in the firm of Alley, Choate & Cummings, the firm of John B. Alley & Co., and later in the firm of Alley Brothers & Place, in which the two sons of Mr. Alley and Mr. Place were the partners. In 1886 this last firm was dissolved, and after a business career of forty-eight years Mr. Alley retired. After his retirement, Mr. Alley went on a European tour, taking the first vacation in a life of seventy years. In his...

Author N. Alley

1st Class Private, Battery E, 30th Div., 113th Field Artillery. Born Dec. 10, 1897. Son of J. M. and Sallie Alley, of Caldwell County. Husband of Frances Alley. Entered service July 25, 1917, at Lenoir, N.C. Was sent to Camp Sevier, S. C., July 25, 1917. Went to France June 19, 1918. Fought at Argonne, St. Mihiel, Sandy Woods. Landed in the USA March 9, 1919, at Newport News, Va. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., March 28,...

Lydia Todd Stoyell

STOYELL, Lydia Todd7, (Caleb6, Caleb5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born July 2, 1807, died April 13, 1873, married Nov. 13, 1833, John Stoyell, who died July 5, 1863. Children: I. Frances, b. Sept. 1, 1834, m. Oct. 25, 1855, Joseph E. Alley, of Moravia, N. Y. Issue: (1) Phebe, b. Jan. 22, 1857, d. Jan. 5, 1859; (2) Stoyell S., b. Jan. 9, 1859, m. Lida R. Brown; (3) May, b. Sept. 7, 1861, m. Aaron C. Whitman; (4) Edgar, b. Feb. 24, 1864, m. Elizabeth Newkirk; (5) Louisa, b. Aug. 2, 1868, m. John J. Young. II. Mahala B., b. Aug. 4, 1836, m. March 24, 1862, Morris K. Alley, of Moravia, N. Y., who d. Feb. 26, 1902. Issue: (1) Julia, b. Feb. 22, 1863, m. Clinton G. Vosburg; (2) Florence, b. Sept. 18, 1865, m. John C. Collier; (3) James, b. July 14, 1868, d. May 29, 1889; (4) Son, d. young; (5) Henry, b. Nov. 11, 1872. III. William T., b. March 13, 1838, d. July 6, 1902, m. Aug. 20, 1862, Frances E. Wright, they lived in Moravia, N. Y. Issue: (1) Lena Almeda, b. Oct. 5, 1869, d. March 17, 1874; (2) Grove, b. June 17, 1875; (3) Lydia, b. March 3, 1877. IV. John, b. July 25, 1842, m. May 1, 1872, Hattie Dougherty; they lived in Kansas. Issue: (1) John Cady, b. May 30, 1873; (2) Guy Bradley; (3) Hilda Elma. V. Smith, b. May 25, 1848, m. Sept. 14, 1882, Helen Louise Osborn. Issue: (1) Marion, b. July 2, 1885. He lives now (1914) in Port Byron, N....

Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of government resembling that of the United States. It is a lesser known fact that there was considerably more intermarriage between Cherokees and Whites than any other tribe, so they have a genealogical significance far out of proportion to their historical numbers. There is also a great deal of genealogical data on the Cherokees, mostly in the form of census records and enrollment records. All of which is to point out the abundance of sources available to Emmet Starr when he came to pen his classic History of the Cherokee Indians and Their Legends and Folklore. Not to diminish Mr. Starr’s contribution in writing about the early Cherokees, their constitution, treaties with the federal government, land transactions, school system, migration and resettlement, committees, councils, and officials, religion, language, and culture, and a host of other topics upon which he writes eloquently, but his stated purpose in writing the History was “to make it as near a personal history and biography of as many Cherokees as possible.” And in fact more than...

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