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Biographical Sketch of Pietro Caesar Alberto

Pietro Caesar Alberto, the pioneer ancestor of Arthur Benjamin Burtis, of Oaks Corners, New York, from Venice, Italy, records his arrival in Nieuw Amsterdam in the Council Minutes of the West India Company, December, 1638, by entering a complaint against the skipper of the ship “Love.” It is also recorded that in the year 1635 this same skipper (David Pieterson de Vries, of Hoorn) had threatened to leave Pietro C. Alberto at Cayenne and Virginia. The register of the provincial secretary records a contract between Pietro C. Alberto and Peter Monfoort to build a house and make a plantation, December 15, 1639. In 1642 he connected himself with the First Dutch church of Nieuw Amsterdam. and on August 24, 1642, was betrothed to Indith lans Manje, daughter of Van Manje from New Kirk, Flanders. Pietro C. Alberto lived at this time on the Heesen Gracht, now (1910) Broad street. New York, and owned a tobacco plantation at the Wallabout for which he received a grant from Governor Kieft, June 17, 1643. It comprised the land now (1910) lying between Clermont and Hampdon avenues, the site of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. After his death it was sold to Ian Darmen, in 1686. The burial place of Pietro C. Alberto is not known, but was probably in Nieuw Amsterdam, as his eldest daughter was living on Beaver street, between Broad and William streets. Children of Pietro C. and Indith (Manje) Alberto, baptized in Dutch church in New Amsterdam, were: Ian, August 30, 1643; Marta, May 7, 1645; Aert (Arthur), April 14, 1647; Marie, June 27, 1649; Francyntie, April 2, 1651; William,...

Biographical Sketch of Arthur Alberto

Arthur Alberto, from whom the branch of the family herein recorded descended, built a house in Hempstead, Long Island, in 1680, which stood until 1892, when it was torn down. Of the farm of fifty-two acres, where he lived until 1692, only the burying ground and a few acres remain. Five generations of the family are buried there, and living descendants of the name in the seventh generation are still there. He married Elizabeth, daughter of James Way, an English Quaker originally from Somersetshire. The Way family appear upon the records there in 1400. James Way died in 1695, a just man, a loyal Englishman, and an Orthodox Quaker of great wealth. Of the seven children mentioned in the will of Arthur Alberto, James, born in 1682-83, seemed to have lived and died in Hempstead, Long Island, and John, through whom the line...

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