Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Biography of Otto Edward Ahrens

Otto Edward Ahrens is actively connected with a profession which has important bearing upon the progress and stability of every community, for through thirteen years he has been actively engaged in the practice or law. During this period he has made steady progress in his profession, owing to the possession of certain qualities. He throws himself easily and naturally into the argument, displaying a deliberation which shows no straining after effect. There is precision and clearness in his statements, combined with acuteness and strength in his reasoning, and thus his high position at the bar is well merited. A native of Germany, Otto E. Ahrens was born in Pomerania, May 14, 1855, a son of William G. and Charlotte Ahrens, who were also natives of that country. The father was born in the city of Hagenow Schuerin September 18, 1821, and learned the trade of wagon and carriage building, which he followed in Germany until 1856 and then sought the opportunities of the new world, establishing his home in Elgin. Illinois, where his wife passed away in 1857, leaving two sons and a daughter: William, now a resident of Elgin; Otto E.; and Caroline Pauline, the wife of William Smith, of Chicago. The father, William G. Ahrens, was one of four brothers who enlisted for service in the Union army, although at the time of their enlistment none of them had become naturalized citizens. William G. Ahrens enlisted at Chicago on the 7th of August, 1862, was mustered into service on the 6th of September as a private-of Company C, One Hundred and Twenty-Seventh Regiment. Illinois Volunteer Infantry, to...

Biography of Bertha Louise Ahrens

Bertha Louise Ahrens (B. Feb. 26, 1857), missionary teacher among the Choctaw Freedmen of Indian Territory since 1885, and principal teacher at Oak Hill Academy, 1905-1911, is a native of Berlin, Prussia. Her parents, Otto and Augusta Ahrens, in 1865, when she was 8, and a brother Otto 5, came to America and located on a farm near Sigourney, Iowa, after one year at Bellville, Illinois; and four, at Harper, Iowa. The schools and Churches first attended used the German language. Her first studies in English were in the graded schools at Sigourney and here at seventeen, she became a member of the Presbyterian Church under the pastorate of Rev. S. G. Hair. He loaned her some missionary literature to read and it awakened a desire on her part to become a missionary. This desire was expressed to the Women’s Missionary society of the Church and she was encouraged to attend the Western Female Seminary, now college, at Oxford, Ohio. After a course of study at this institution she enjoyed a year’s training in the Bible school connected with Moody’s Chicago Avenue Church, Chicago. During the next year, after hearing in her home town an appeal in behalf of a Negro school in the south, she was led to offer her services to the Presbyterian Board of Missions for Freedmen. In December 1885, she received a commission with request to locate among the Choctaw Freedmen at Lukfata, in the southeast part of Indian Territory. The route at that early date was quite circuitous. Going south through Kansas City over the M. K. T. Ry., to Denison, Texas, she passed...

Pin It on Pinterest