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Cleveland County Oklahoma Cemeteries

Most of these Cleveland County Oklahoma cemeteries are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we provide the listing when it is only a partial listing. Hosted at Cleveland County OKGenWeb Archives Blackburn Cemetery Box Cemetery Corbett Cemetery Corbett Cemetery Tombstone Photos Denton Cemetery Denver Cemetery Falls Cemetery Knoles Cemetery Tombstone of Martin V B Knoles Maguire-Fairview Cemetery Schwartz Cemetery Sunset Memorial Park Cemetery U.G./Kear Memorial Cemetery Warren Cemetery Cemetery Hosted at Oklahoma Genealogical Society Indian Graves Hosted at GenRoots Emmanual Memorial Cemetery – South OKC IOOF Cemetery – Noble IOOF Cemetery – Norman Moore Cemetery Resthaven Memory Gardens – OKC St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery – Norman Sunset Memorial Park – Norman Hosted at Oklahoma Cemeteries Absentee Shawnee Tribal Cemetery Adkins Family Cemetery Banner Cemetery Bethel Cemetery Blackburn Cemetery Blanchard Family Cemetery Box Cemetery Chappel Hill Cemetery, aka Cropper Cemetery, aka Rose Hill Denver Cemetery Dripping Springs Cemetery Emanuel Cemetery Fairview Cemetery Falls Cemetery Ford Cemetery, aka Pleasant Grove Friendship Cemetery Guillen Cemetery Heritage Burial Park Hillside Cemetery Holsonbake Cemetery, aka Denton, Elsiemont Independence Cemetery Knoles Cemetery, aka Pleasant Ridge Cemetery Lexington Cemetery Lilac Hill Cemetery Little Axe Family Cemetery Little Axe Tribal Cemetery Little Charley Family Cemetery Maguire – Fairview Cemetery Moore City Cemetery Mt. Zion Cemetery Noble I O O F Cemetery Norman I O O F Cemetery Pilgrims Rest Cemetery Red Oak Cemetery Resthaven Cemetery Rock Creek Cemetery Rose Hill Cemetery Sanford Cemetery Schwartz Cemetery Shiloh Cemetery Smith Cemetery St. John’s Cemetery St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery Stella Cemetery Sunset Memorial Park Cemetery Tiger Family Cemetery U. G. Kear Memorial Cemetery Warren Cemetery, aka...

Slave Narrative of Ida Adkins

Interviewer: Travis Jordan Person Interviewed: Ida Adkins Location: Durham, North Carolina Age: 79 Ex-slave 79 years. [TR note: Numerous hand written notations and additions in the following interview (i.e. wuz to was; er to a; adding t to the contractions.) Made changes where obvious without comment. Additions and comments were left as notation, in order to preserve the flow of the dialect.] I wuz bawn befo’ de war. I wuz about eight years ole when de Yankee mens come through. My mammy an’ pappy, Hattie an’ Jim Jeffries belonged to Marse Frank Jeffries. Marse Frank come from Mississippi, but when I wuz bawn he an’ Mis’ Mary Jane wuz livin’ down herr near Louisburg in North Carolina whare dey had er big plantation an’ [HW addition: I] don’ know how many niggers. Marse Frank wuz good to his niggers, ‘cept [HW addition: that] he never give dem ernough to eat. He worked dem hard on half rations, but he didn’ believe in all de time beatin’ an’ sellin’ dem. My pappy worked at de stables, he wuz er good horseman, but my mammy worked at de big house helpin’ Mis’ Mary Jane. Mammy worked in de weavin’ room. I can see her now settin’ at de weavin’ machine an’ hear de pedals goin’ plop, plop, as she treaded dem wid her feets. She wuz a good weaver. I stayed ‘roun’ de big house too, pickin’ up chips, sweepin’ de yard an’ such as dat. Mis’ Mary Jane wuz quick as er whippo’-will. She had black eyes dat snapped, an’ dey seed everythin’. She could turn her head so quick...

Biography of Eugene Sloan Adkins

Eugene Sloan Adkins, organizer and promoter of the Adkins Hay & Feed Company of Muskogee, is also identified with other important business interests of the state, whereby he has won classification with the representative merchants of Oklahoma. His plans have always been carefully defined and promptly executed and his energy has enabled him to overcome all difficulties and obstacles in his path. Mr. Adkins was born in Choteau, Oklahoma, March 26, 1896, and is a son of Moses E. and Hattie (Sloan) Adkins. The father is deceased. Eugene S. Adkins obtained a public school education, completing a course in the high school of Muskogee, while later he attended Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tennessee, and was there graduated with the class of 1913. In 1915 he established a hay and grain business at Choteau, his native city, where he remained until 1917, when he organized the Adkins Hay & Feed Company of Muskogee, which is incorporated. In 1921 he built an elevator twenty-six and a half by twenty-seven and a half feet and one hundred and thirty-two feet in height. He also built a concrete warehouse one hundred and ten by thirty feet. The business was capitalized for seventy-five thousand dollars with Mr. Adkins as the president and manager. The volume of his trade is steadily increasing and he is one of the foremost representatives of the hay and grain trade in his section of the state. He has also extended his efforts into other fields, for he is a director of the Ratcliff-Sanders Grocery Company of Tulsa, Oklahoma, and also of the Sallisaw Wholesale Grocery Company of Sallisaw, Oklahoma....

Adkins, Mrs. James E. – Obituary

Enterprise, Oregon Mrs. James E. Adkins died at Portland March 4 and funeral services were held in that city Monday. Mr. and Mrs. Adkins lived in Enterprise several years and went from here to Portland. Mrs. Adkins was 41 years old and was survived by her husband and three children, Harold, now living at Astoria, and John and Glenn, of Portland. Enterprise Record Chieftain, November 17, 1927 Page 5 Contributed By: Sue Wells, Elgin, Union County,...

Adkins, Vernon Wesley – Obituary

Vernon Wesley Adkins, 86, of Union, died Dec. 11 at his home. At his request there will be no public services. Mr. Adkins was born Nov. 3, 1919, to Wesley and Anna May Ego Adkins in Baker City. He was raised in Cove and Union. On Oct. 5, 1940, he married Iris Taylor in Weiser, Idaho. He worked for the Union Railroad of Oregon for a number of years before working as a meat cutter for Union Cash Grocery until 1983 when he retired. Mr. Adkins was a life member of the Grande Ronde Valley Masonic Lodge and the Royal Arch Masons. He enjoyed square dancing, and served on the Union School Board, the Union City Council and the Union Volunteer Fire Department for many years Survivors include his wife of Union; children and their spouses, Linda and Dale Conklin of Heppner and Kerry and Kim Adkins of Union; six grandchildren; six great-grandchildren and other relatives. Two brothers, Bernard and Dewey Adkins, and a sister, Iola Childers, all died earlier. Memorials may be made to the Union Athletic Complex or any charity in care of Daniels Chapel of the Valley, 1502 Seventh St. An on-line guest book can be found at www.danielschapel.com . LaGrande Observer – Obituaries for the week ending Dec. 17, 2005 – Published: December 19, 2005 Submitted by Dixie...

Gershom Todd

Gershom Todd6, (Benjamin5, Titus4, Benjamin3, Michael2, Christopher1) born Oct. 25, 1784, died Jan. 9, 1866, married Feb. 8, 1809, Anna Peet, who was born May 27, 1786, died Jan. 28, 1843. Children: *918. Orrin Blair, b. May 29, 1811. 919. Plyment Memory, b. Mar. 15, 1817, d. Sept. 3, 1845. 920. Hervey Benjamin, b. Nov. 21, 1820, d. Aug., 1868, m. in 1868. 921. Antoinette Lodemia, b. March 9, 1823, m. May 24, 1846, Jonathan Mann, who died July, 1891. 922. Celestia May, b. July 7, 1826, d. April 3, 1887, m. Mason Adkins. *923. Dwight Austin, b. Oct. 7, 1829. 924. Cornelius Justin, b. Jan. 13, 1833, d. Sept. 3,...

Muhlenberg County, Kentucky Wills

Muhlenberg County, Kentucky Wills Hosted at Muhlenberg County USGenWeb Archives Project Abbott, John , 1814 Allcocke, Richard Nelson , 1803, probated 1807 Allison, William , 1814 Anderson, Robert , 1812 Armstrong, John , 1808, probated 1818 Bates, Simeon , 1849 Bilbrew, Thomas , 1827 Boggess, Anne , 1819 Boggess, Nancy or Ann , part 2, 1819 Buckley (or Buckles), William , 1825 Byrd, John , 1808 Campbell, Alexander , 1827 Campbell, Charles , 1821 Campbell, Mary , 1810, probated 1823 Campbell, Patrick , 1799 Campbell, William , 1800 Cash, Richard , 1823, probated 1824 Cooly, Susanna , 1807 Craig, James 1811, probated 1816 Davis, Henry , probated 1805 Davis, Margaret , 1816 Dobyns, Batten , 1804 Downing, Elisha , 1823 Dukes, Samuel , 1821 Durelle, John , 1808 Durval or Duvall, (sp) Skinner , 1809 Forrester, Sarah , 1816 Gish, Christian II , 1814 Gish, John , 1817 Grepo(?), John , 1817 Groves, Jonathan , 1810 Groves, Joseph , 1821 Harp, Samuel , 1815 Hunsaker, Isaac , 1819 Hynes, John , 1827 Irvin, Thomas , Sr., 1823 Jarvis, Edward Jr , 1823 Landis, Jacob , 1823 Lewis, Charles 1806, probated 1808 Littlepage, Eppes , 1812, probated 1816 Lott, Bartholomew , 1819 McCartney, James , 1814 McKinney, John , 1801 Miller, James , 1837, proved 1851 Morgan, Charles ,1822 Naught, George , 1808 Oates, Jesse , 1831 Parks, Andrew , probated 1821 Parks, Andrew , 1824, probated 1826 Perril, Mathis , 1805 Poag, Jane , 1858, proved 1860 Reno, Lewis , 1799 Rhoads, Daniel or David , 1811, proved 1813 Rhoads, Henry , 1812, proved 1813 Rice, Ezekial , 1846...

Powhatan Tribe Divisions

Appomattoc. A tribe of the Powhatan confederacy formerly living on lower Appomattox River, Virginia. They had 60 warriors in 1608, and were of some importance as late as 1671, but were extinct by 1722. Their principal village, which bore the same name was on the site of Bermuda Hundred, Prince George County, was burned by the English in 1611.  Appomatox was also one of the terms applied to the Matchotic, a later combination of remnants of the same confederacy. Consult Further: Appomattoc Tribe Chickahominy (from K’chick-ahän-min’-nough, ‘course-pounded corn people.’ ‘hominy people’ Tooker; or from Tshi-kĕjämĕn, a place name meaning ‘swept,’ “cleared,’ and implying a clearing—Gerard). A tribe of the Powhatan confederacy, formerly living on Chickahominy River, Virginia. It was one of the most important tribes in Virginia, numbering 250 warriors, or perhaps 900 souls, in 1608, and was not so directly under the control of Powhatan as the other tribes over which he ruled. In 1613 they entered into an alliance with the English and assumed the name of Tassautessus (sic), or “Englishmen.” In 1669 they were still estimated at 60 warriors, possibly 220 souls, but in 1722 were reported to number only about 80. Their last public notice occurs in this same year, when, in connection with the Pamunkey, they were named in the Albany conference with the Iroquois as among the Virginia tribes not to be molested by the latter. A mixed-blood band numbering about 220 still keeps up the name, but without regular tribal organization, on both sides of Chickahominy River in New Kent and Charles City County, Virginia, with Wm. H. Adkins as chief in...

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