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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel. Woven in the narratives of it’s people, however, is the story of Colorado. Initial expeditions by European settlers in this area were for trade with the Natives or as a throughfare to California further west. It wasn’t until one of those wagon trains came a man name of Ralston and he dipped his pan into a creek which would later bare his name and pulled out a troy ounce of gold, worth $5 at the time. A decade later, and other miners began to claim the land in the eastern Colorado area. Pushing ever westward in search of the golden dust they eventually found their way into western Coloado. Some of these miners would eventually settle in the area of their mines and became Colorado’s first residents. Some would have their claim luck out and would stay taking up other responsibilities such as ranching, politics, merchandising, etc. In these people’s lives became the story of Colorado – so while this volume is comprised almost solely of biographies, it is also comprised of the history of early Western Colorado. Click on the page number to view the biography. SurnameGivenMiddleView Bio BurgerFrankMPage 17 TaylorEdwardTPage 18 ZerbeAllenLPage 21 VeatchWilliamLPage 23 HarpHoraceSPage 24 GeorgeAlfredPage 25 BrownHoraceGPage 26 HeatonWilliamVPage 27 ThompsonBenjaminHPage 28 WatsonBenjaminKPage 29 SherwoodBenjaminPage 30 DicksonAmosJPage...

What Happened to the Sephardic Jewish Colonists?

There has never been a scientific study to determine the post-colonial history of the Sephardic communities in the Southern Piedmont and Appalachians. Anything that can be said must be in the realm of speculation, based on the known cultural history of the Southeast during the Colonial and Antebellum Eras. The only significant religious-based persecution in the Lower Southeast was between the Sephardic Jews and the Ashkenazi Jews from Eastern Europe. A Protestant minister in Savannah wrote, “Some Jews in Savannah complain that the Spanish and Portuguese Jews should persecute the German Jews in a way no Christian would persecute another Christian.” One of the biggest obstacles to tracing early Sephardic Jewish colonists in the Appalachians is the general acceptance that Jewish citizens received in the Southeast. Unlike the situation in Spanish and French colonies, they were not forbidden entry. Unlike in the North, Jewish settlers were not pressured into the ghettos of large cities. However, for many decades the only Southern synagogues were in old colonial cities such as Savannah, Charleston, Wilmington and Richmond.1 Most of the Jewish immigrants were dispersed as individual families across the landscape of the Southeast’s towns and plantations. The earliest Jewish settlers were Sephardim. German and Eastern European Jews followed. There was apparently little social stigma in the Old South toward marriage between affluent Jews and Christians. Several prominent Christian and Jewish leaders of that era embarked on happy marriages with spouses of the other religion.2 Some of their children became Christian. Some became Jewish. All carried forward a general tolerance for both faiths. Many, if not most, early Jewish settlers, who were isolated...

1921 Farmers’ Directory of Greeley Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Adair, C. W. Wf. Bertha; ch. Florence, Maxine, Don. P. O. Exira, R. 1. O. 120 ac., sec. 24. (37.) Anderson, E. H. Wf. Christina; ch. Russell. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. R. 153.91 ac., sec. 5. (20.) Owner, J. F. Mortinson. Artist, Dan’l. Wf. Sarah; ch. Ada, Sadie, George, John, Elmer, Anna, Clara, Madge, Robert. P. O. Exira, R. 1. O. 80 ac., sec. 2.5; O. 40 ac., sec. 36. Artist, John H. Wf. Mamie; ch. Homer, Hugh, Helen, Margia, John Jr., Amy. P. O. Exira, R. 1. O. 160 ac., sec. 25. (38.) Anciaux, Ray. Wf. Hazel; ch.Orlyn. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. B. 120 ac., sec. 15. (33.) Owner, Maria Anciaux. Anciaux, V. J. Wf. Hannah; ch. Gentle, Glee, Mary, Dollie, Lydia, Ruth, Iva. P. O. Exira. O. 200 ac., sec. 29. (40.) Avey, C. F. Wf. Marie; ch. May, Wynona, Clarence, Marie, Elsie. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. O. 134.49 ac., sec. 4. (35.) Baier, E. J. Wf. Vera; ch. Edward, Richard. P. O. Exira, R. 1. R. 40 ac., sec. 27; R. 120 ac., sec. 34; R. 30 ac., sec. 33; R. 40 ac., sec. 28. (27.) Owner, John Riley. Bach, Axel. Wf. Ebba; ch. Annie, Helen. P. O. Exira, R. 1. R.120 ac., sec. 25. (2.) Owner, Emil Wiges. Baier, O. C. Wf. Olga; ch. Howard, Dale, Berdell. P. O. Exira. R. 80 ac., sec. 25; R. 88 ac., sec. 28. (26.) Owner, Jacob Hafer. Bauer, J. L.Wf. Emma; ch. Bertha, George, Walter, Melvin....

Choctaw Hunting Practices

Adair (p. 89) says; “the Choctaws, in an early day, practiced the custom of flattening the heads of their infants by compression, and were first known to the whites by the name of Flat Heads.” Be that as it may, the custom had long ceased to be practiced, when later known. Wherever they went, distant or otherwise, many or few, they always traveled in a straight line, one behind the other. (They needed no broad roads, nor had they any; hence, they dispensed with the necessity of that expense, road-working, so grudgingly bestowed by all white men. Paths alone, plain and straight, then led the Choctaws where now are broads roads and long high bridges, from village to neighborhood, and from neighborhood to village, though many miles apart; and so open and free of logs, bushes, and all fallen timber, was their country then, rendered thus by their annual burning off of the woods, it was an easy matter to travel in any direction and any distance, except through the vast cane-brakes that covered all the bottom lands, which alone could be passed by paths. On hunting excursions, when a party moved their camp to another point in the woods, whether far or near, they invariably left a broken bush with the top leaning in the direction they had gone, readily comprehended by the practiced eye of the Choctaw hunter. They kept a straight line to where a turn was made, and whatever angle there taken, they traveled it in a straight line, but left the broken bush at the turn indicating the direction they had taken. If a...

Choctaw Culture

The Choctaws, like all of their race, had no written laws, and their government rested alone on custom and usage, growing out of their possessions and their wants; yet was conducted so harmoniously by the influence of their native genius and experience, that one would hardly believe that human society could be maintained with so little artifice. As they had no money, their traffic consisted alone in mutual exchange of all commodities; as there was no employment of others for hire, there were no contracts, hence judges and lawyers, sheriffs and jails were unknown among them. There were no beg gars, no wandering tramps, no orphan children unprovided for in their country, and deformity was almost unknown, proving that nature in the wild forest of the wilderness is true to her type. Their chief had no crown, no sceptre, no bodyguards, no outward symbols of authority, nor power to give validity to their commands, but sustained their authority alone upon the good opinion of their tribe. No Choctaw ever worshiped his fellow man, or submitted his will to the humiliating subordinations of another, but with that sentiment of devotion that passed beyond the region of humanity, and brought him in direct contact with nature and the imaginary beings by whom it was controlled, which he divined but could not fathom; to these, and these alone, he paid his homage, invoking their protection in war and their aid in the chase. The ancient Choctaws believed, and those of the present day believe, and I was informed by Governor Basil LeFlore, in 1884, (since deceased) that there is an appointed time for...

Gen. Anthony Wayne’s Campaign

In April 1792, General Anthony Wayne was appointed by the general government to take command of the Northwestern Army. On the 5th of the following November a hundred men from Kentucky, under Adair as captain, made a raid across the Ohio River into the Indians country, but the indefatigable Little Turtle and his band of heroes met him and, in a severe fight: defeated him, with heavy loss, and drove him back to his own. In the spring of 1793, during the arrangements that were being made for Wayne’s campaign, Congress sent commissioners to the Northwest Indians to negotiate a treaty on the basis of the treaty made at Fort Harmer in 1789. This treaty-making with the Northwest Indians was not a step with the view of civilizing the Indians and bringing them under the benign influences of Christianity, nor was the organization of Wayne’s army for the purpose of protecting them from the raids of the marauding companies of white marauders, robbers and thieves, who invaded there country whenever the desired; but for the accomplishment of a scheme for robbing the helpless Indians of their country and homes. The commissioners called a council of tap Indians to be held at the mouth of the Muskingum River. Now, it is a known fact, that the. Congress of the United States never did assemble any tribe or tribes of Indians upon the North American continent from 1776 to the present time, for the humane purpose of consulting with them upon measures relating to their civilization and Christianity. Never. But to rob and swindle them out of their country was the only...

The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his maps and geographical charts, and also wrote, at his dictation, his journals concerning his voyages. Shortly after the marriage of Columbus and Felipa at Lisbon, they moved to the island of Porto Santo which her father had colonized and was governor at the time of his death, and settled on a large landed estate which belonged to Palestrello, and which he had bequeathed to Felipa together with all his journals and papers. In that home of retirement and peace the young husband and wife lived in connubial bliss for many years. How could it be otherwise, since each had found in the other a congenial spirit, full of adventurous explorations, but which all others regarded as visionary follies? They read together and talked over the journals and papers of Bartolomeo, during which Felipa also entertained Columbus with accounts of her own voyages with her father, together with his opinions and those of other navigators of that age his friends and companions of a possible country that might be discovered in the distant West, and the...

Massacre at Howard’s Well and Other Depredations – Indian Wars

Closely following the outbreak of the Cherokees and half -breed renegades at Whitemore‘s, Barren Fork, came on attack by a similar party of Indians, half breeds, and Mexicans combined, on a train of supplies, en route to Fort Stockton, at Howard’s Well, near old Fort Lancaster. The facts of this one of the most inhuman massacres in history were reported to the “War Department, by Col. Merritt, through General Angua, under date of April 29th, 1872. We give the report as written: On the 20th inst, I arrived with the cavalry of my command at Howard’s Well, a few hours too late to prevent one of the most horrible massacres that has ever been perpetrated on this frontier. A Mexican train, loaded with United States commissary and ordinance stores, on its way from San Antonio to Fort Stockton, was attacked by Indians, plundered and burned. All the people with the train, seventeen souls in all, were killed or wounded, except one woman. My command buried eleven bodies, and brought three wounded men and one woman into this post. Before arriving at the burning train, the first intimation we had of the horrible disaster were the charred and blackened corpses of some of the poor victims, but no one was alive to tell the horrors of the affair. I supposed, up to this time, that Capt. Sheridan, with the infantry of my command was in camp at Howard’s Well, about a mile from the scene of the massacre, and while yet some distance from the point the smoke of the burning wagons, mistaken for his camp fires, confirmed me in this...

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Luther H. Adair

(See Ghigau and Adair)-Lillie M. daughter of Allen and Lou (Fisher) Waldrop was born in Texas Friday Dec 8, 1865. Married Nov. 17, 1883 Luther Martin, son of Captain Ephriam Martin and Sallie (Starr) Adair, born in Flint District April 30, 1859. He died January 3, 1908. They were the parents of. Sarah Leola, born June 3, 1885; William Luther, born Feb. 16, 1887; Mary, born Aug. 5, 1889; Myrtle Lucinda, born December 11, 1891; Altie, born Nov. 4, 1894; Collie Bessie, born Jan. 1, 1897; Emmet Marshall born July 11, 1899; Nona Bertha, born Sept. 17, 1901; Arnie C., born Feb. 23, 1904 and Howard Ugean Adair, born Jan. 31, 1908. Sarah and Mary attended the Female Seminary. William L. was educated in Male Seminary and spent nine months in the service of the World War. Mrs. Adair is a member of the Church of...

Biographical Sketch of Levi Adair

(See Grant and Adair) George M. Adair married Catherine Fields and their son Henry Ganoe Adair was born August 10. 1865. Married in May 1884 Caroline Bunch, born April 13, 1863. He elected sheriff of Illinois District August 5, 1895. He died. They were the parents of: Araminta, born May 10, 1885; George, born May 24, 1887; John Bell, born June 12, 1894; Catherine, born August 9, 1897; Levi, born June 9, 1900 and Zola B. Adair, born June 10, 1905. John Adair, a Scotchman married in 1789 Ga-ho-ka, a full blood Cherokee of the Deer Clan. Their son Samuel Adair married Mary Hughes. He was elected sheriff of Flint District in 1857 and 1859. Elected judge of the same District 1867, 1873, and 7. He died February 17, 1879. His wife had died in 1874. They were the parents; of George M. Adair who married Catherine...
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