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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Slave Narrative of Charlie Crump

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Charlie Crump Location: Cary, North Carolina Place of Birth: Evan’s Ferry, Lee or Chatham County, North Carolina Age: 82 Occupation: Farmer An interview with Charlie Crump 82 of Cary (near) I wuz borned at Evan’s Ferry in Lee or Chatham County, an’ I belonged ter Mr. Davis Abernathy an’ his wife Mis’ Vick. My pappy wuz named Ridge, an’ my mammy wuz named Marthy. My brothers wuz Stokes an’ Tucker, an’ my sisters wuz Lula an’ Liddy Ann. Dar wuz nine o’ us in all, but some o’ dem wuz sold, an’ some o’ dem wuz dead. De Abernathy’s wuzn’t good ter us, we got very little ter eat, nothin’ ter wear an’ a whole lot o’ whuppin’s. Dey ain’t had no slaves ‘cept seben or eight, in fact, dey wuz pore white trash tryin’ ter git rich; so dey make us wuck. Dey wucks us from daylight till dark, an’ sometimes we jist gits one meal a day. De marster says dat empty niggers am good niggers an’ dat full niggers has got de debil in dem. An’ we ain’t ‘lowed ter go nowhar at night, dat is if dey knowed it. I’se seed de time dat niggers from all ober de neighborhood gang up an’ have fun anyhow, but if dey hyard de patterollers comin’ gallopin’ on a hoss dey’d fly. Crap shootin’ wuz de style den, but a heap of times dey can’t find nothin ter bet. I toted water, case dat’s all I wuz big enough ter do, an’ lemmie tell yo’ dat when de war wuz ober I...

Biography of Henry H. Abernathy

There are few of the representative and respected men of Idaho whose residence in the state antedates that of Mr. Abernathy, who came to the territory thirty-seven years ago and has been identified with the development of the Salubria valley since 1868. The old Indian trails, the uncultivated lands, the unopened mines and the uncut forests then to be seen, all told that the work of civilization lay in the future, and the subject of this review has been one of the advance guard that has carried forward the work of progress and improvement until Idaho is, indeed, the veritable “Gem of the Mountains.” A native of Indiana, he was born September 10, 1834, and is of English and Scotch lineage, his ancestors having left the land of hills and heather and taken up their residence in Kentucky. John Abernathy, father of our subject, was born in Virginia, but when a young man removed to Ohio, where he married Sarah Munkester, a native of Pennsylvania. They removed to Indiana, where the father engaged in farming for a number of years, and then took his family to Wapello County, Iowa, where he carried on agricultural pursuits until his life’s labors were ended in death, at the age of seventy years. He was an honest and industrious man who lived peaceably with his neighbors and never sued or was sued by any one in his life. He was seventy years of age at the time of his death, and his wife passed away in 1849, in her fifty-fifth year. They were consistent members of the Methodist church, and reared a family...

Biography of Col. James L. Abernathy

Col. James L. Abernathy. For nearly a half century one of the conspicuous figures in Kansas history was the late James L. Abernathy, whose name is inseparably interwoven with the material prosperity of Leavenworth, to which he came in 1856, when it was but a frontier town. He was born in Warren County, Ohio, March 20, 1833. In early manhood he accompanied his parents in their removal to Rush County, Indiana, and at Rushville, the county seat, embarked in mercantile pursuits. In the early ’50s the great West, then represented by the vast unsettled territory west of the Missouri River, seemed to possess glamour and fascination for the adventurous spirit of American youth, and it found lodgment in the mind of young Abernathy. In 1856 the contention of the free soil and proslavery factions for possession of Kansas soil, and the notable public debates of the time, had focused attention on this section of the country. This may have had something to do with Mr. Abernathy’s choice of Leavenworth as a home. Undoubtedly he was attracted by the business possibilities of the place, for it was full of bustle and enterprise, a frontier forwarding point for the rapidly increasing population. He was accompanied by his brother, William, and together they embarked in the retail furniture business, in a small way beginning the manufacture of furniture, and this was the beginning of one of the greatest of Leavenworth’s industries. It had already assumed large proportions when grim civil war threatened the disruption of the Union. Mr. Abernathy had taken a strong attitude against the pro-slavery factions and had voted for...

Biographical Sketch of F. J. Abernathy

Mr. Abernathy, of Bonham, was born in Giles County Tennessee, in 1834. He came to this state in 1862, and followed the business of school teaching for twelve consecutive years. In 1878, he was appointed as Notary public in this county, in conjunction with which he at once opened a real estate business. Mr. Abernathy is a prompt and reliable businessman, and thoroughly understands his business. , In his real estate transactions, he confines himself to this county, and is well posted on real estate values, land titles, and everything pertaining to the real estate line. His work as Notary is carefully and neatly done. A natural physical deformity renders it impossible for him to perform any manual labor, but the cheerfulness, with which he bears his deformity, and his promptness and efficiency in business, makes one loose sight of it. He can be found at any time during the day in his neat little office in the North West Corner of the Court House...

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