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Sioux Indian Wars

Sioux Indian Wars The Sioux Wars were a series of conflicts between the United States and various subgroups of the Sioux people that occurred in the latter half of the 19th century. The Teton Sioux tribes were comprised of Oglala, Hunkpapa, Brule, Miniconjou, Blackfoot, San Arc, Two Kettle in the nineteenth century. Santee, Lakota, 1854 – 1890 The earliest conflict came in 1854 when a fight broke out at Fort Laramie in Wyoming, when Indian warriors killed 29 U.S. soldiers after their chief was shot in the back, in what became known as the Grattan Massacre. The U.S. exacted revenge the next year by killing approximately 100 Sioux in Nebraska. War of the Mormon Cow (hosted at FReeper Foxhole) Grattan Massacre (hosted at Wikepedia) Native Americans on the Oregon Trail (hosted at Idaho State University) Sioux War 1862 By 1862, the Santee Sioux had given up their traditional homelands, which comprised most of southern Minnesota, in exchange for a narrow reservation on the southern bank of the Minnesota River. As compensation for their lands, the Sioux were to receive cash annuities and supplies that would enable them to live without the resources from their traditional hunting grounds. Because of administrative delays, however, both the cash and food had not arrived by the summer of 1862. Crop failures the previous fall made the late food delivery particularly distressing to the Indians. Encroachment by settlers on reservation land and the unfair practices of many American traders also fueled Sioux suspicions and hatred. Map, Sioux War 1862 Sioux War of 1862 (hosted at Fort Wilki) Minnesota’s Uncivil War (hosted at Minnesota Public...

Republic of Texas War Records

Formed as a break-away republic from Mexico by the Texas Revolution, the state claimed borders that encompassed an area that included all of the present U.S. state of Texas, as well as parts of present-day New Mexico, Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado, and Wyoming based upon the Treaties of Velasco between the newly created Texas Republic and Mexico. The eastern boundary with the United States was defined by the Adams-Onís Treaty between the United States and Spain, in 1819. Its southern and western-most boundary with Mexico was under dispute throughout the existence of the Republic, with Texas claiming that the boundary was the Rio Grande, and Mexico claiming the Nueces River as the boundary. This dispute would later become a trigger for the Mexican–American War, after the annexation of Texas. The Republic of Texas was created from part of the Mexican state Coahuila y Tejas as a result of the Texas Revolution. Mexico was in turmoil as leaders attempted to determine an optimal form of government. In 1835, when President Antonio López de Santa Anna abolished the Constitution of 1824, granting himself enormous powers over the government, wary colonists in Texas began forming Committees of Correspondence and Safety. A central committee in San Felipe de Austin coordinated their activities. In the Mexican interior, several states revolted against the new centralist policies. The Texas Revolution officially began on 2 October 1835, in the Battle of Gonzales. Although the Texians originally fought for the reinstatement of the Constitution of 1824, by 1836 the aim of the war had changed. The Convention of 1836 declared independence on 2 March 1836, and officially formed the...

Mexican War Records

The Mexican–American War was an armed conflict between the United States and Mexico from 1846 to 1848 in the wake of the 1845 U.S. annexation of Texas, which Mexico considered part of its territory despite the 1836 Texas Revolution. In addition to a naval blockade off the Mexican coast, American forces invaded and conquered New Mexico, California, and parts of what is currently northern Mexico. Another American army captured Mexico City, forcing Mexico to agree to the sale of its northern territories to the U.S. Territorial expansion of the United States to the Pacific coast was the goal of President James K. Polk, the leader of the Democratic Party.[1] However, the war was highly controversial in the U.S., with the Whig Party and anti-slavery elements strongly opposed. The major consequence of the war was the forced Mexican Cession of the territories of California and New Mexico to the United States in exchange for $15 million. In addition, the United States forgave debt owed by the Mexican government to U.S. citizens. 1846-1848 Requesting Military Records Cemeteries US Military National Cemeteries Burial Search US Military State Cemeteries Burial Listings (hosted at American Battle Monuments Commission) Online Records The Mexican War (hosted at Lone Star Internet) Mexican War (hosted at Son of the South) Time Line Mexican War Map US Generals and Leaders Key Battles US – Mexican War (hosted at PBS) Prelude to War Biographies, United States and Mexico US Mexican War (hosted at Descendants of Mexican War Veterans) A Concise History of the US-Mexican War Mexican War (hosted at Price of Freedom) Navy in the Mexican War (hosted at Naval...

King William’s War

King William’s War (the first of the French and Indian Wars) began in New England as an extension of the war between England and France, when in July 1689 the French governor of Canada incited the Indians to brutally attack Dover, N.H., then known as Cochecho. By then, according to the letters of Edmund Andros, governor of New England, Maine had already been deeply embroiled in the conflict for a year. In June 1689, several hundred Abenaki and Pennacook Indians under the command of Kancamagus and Mesandowit raided Dover, New Hampshire, killing more than 20 and taking 29 captives, who were sold into captivity in New France. Jean-Vincent d’Abbadie de Saint-Castin, a Frenchman whose home on Penobscot Bay (near present-day Castine, Maine, named for him) had been plundered by Governor Andros in 1688, led an Abenaki war party to raid Pemaquid in August 1689. Also in August 1689, 1,500 Iroquois attacked the French settlement at Lachine before New France had even learned of the start of the war. Frontenac later attacked the Iroquois village of Onondaga. New France and its Indian allies then attacked English frontier settlements, most notably the Schenectady Massacre of 1690. The Treaty of Ryswick in 1697 ended the war between the two colonial powers, reverting the colonial borders to the status quo ante bellum. The peace did not last long, and within five years, the colonies were embroiled in the next of the French and Indian Wars, Queen Anne’s War. After their settlement with France in 1701, the Iroquois remained neutral in the early part of the war. 1689 to 1697 King William’s War –...

Korean War Military Records

The Korean War was a military conflict between the Republic of Korea, supported by the United Nations, and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and People’s Republic of China (PRC), with air support from the Soviet Union. The war began on 25 June 1950 and an armistice was signed on 27 July 1953. The war was a result of the political division of Korea by agreement of the victorious Allies at the conclusion of the Pacific War. The Korean peninsula had been ruled by Japan from 1910 until the end of World War II. In 1945, following the surrender of Japan, American administrators divided the peninsula along the 38th Parallel, with United States troops occupying the southern part and Soviet troops occupying the northern part. The failure to hold free elections throughout the Korean Peninsula in 1948 deepened the division between the two sides, and the North established a Communist government. The 38th Parallel increasingly became a political border between the two Koreas. Although reunification negotiations continued in the months preceding the war, tension intensified. Cross-border skirmishes and raids at the 38th Parallel persisted. The situation escalated into open warfare when North Korean forces invaded South Korea on 25 June 1950. It was the first significant armed conflict of the Cold War. 1950-1953 Korean War Causality Lists Korean War Casualty ListThe National Archives and Records Administration prepared these Korean War casualty lists by creating extracts from the military casualty data files in the Records of the Office of the Secretary of Defense (Record Group 330). The lists are based on the "home of record - state" data provided by...

Indian Wars

  Indian Wars, Conflicts and Disturbances 1614 – 1893 Indian War Medals of Honor (hosted at United States Army) Pequot Indian War French and Indian War Seminole Wars 1817 1835-1842 1855-1858 Creek Wars 1811 1814 1836 Black Hawk War, 1832 Black Hawk War, Utah, 1856 – 1857  ...

Civil War Records

The American Civil War (1861-–1865), also known as the War Between the States (among other names), was a civil war in the United States of America. Eleven Southern slave states declared their secession from the United States and formed the Confederate States of America, also known as “the Confederacy.” Led by Jefferson Davis, the Confederacy fought against the United States (the Union), which was supported by all the free states (where slavery had been abolished) and by five slave states that became known as the border states. Hostilities began on April 12, 1861, when Confederate forces attacked a U.S. military installation at Fort Sumter in South Carolina. Lincoln responded by calling for a volunteer army from each state to recapture federal property. This led to declarations of secession by four more slave states. Both sides raised armies as the Union assumed control of the border states early in the war and established a naval blockade. In September 1862, Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation made ending slavery in the South a war goal, and dissuaded the British from intervening. Records for the Civil War General Index of Pension Files, 1861-1934 Microfilm at the National Archives Discovering the Civil War (hosted at National Archives) ARC Civil War Gallery (A Varity of Topics) ARC Guide for Genealogists and Family Historians Research in Military Records Civil War Researching Confederate Marines in the Civil War Civil War Cemeteries Civil War Battlefield Maps Databases Records by State Civil War Biographies The military services of Maj.-Gen. Ambrose Everett Burnside in the Civil War, and their value as an asset of his country and its history Civil War Cemeteries...

Civil War Microfilm at the National Archives

Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations Raised Directly by the Confederate Government. (M258. 123 rolls. 16mm. DP.) This microfilm publication reproduces the compiled service records of Confederate soldiers who served in military organizations raised directly or otherwise formed by the Confederate government and therefore not identified with any one state. Two or three of these organizations seem to have been originally considered units of the Confederate Regular Army. Several others were raised among residents of Indian Territory; one was made up of foreigners recruited among Union prisoners of war. Preceding the jacket-envelopes for the individual soldiers in each organizational unit, there are usually empty envelopes on which the officers of the unit are listed. Jacket-envelopes contain cards showing the exact captions of muster-in and muster-out rolls that were copied and the certifications of the mustering officers verifying the accuracy of the rolls. Record-of-events cards indicate the activities in which any part of the unit had been engaged. Because of the irregular way in which most of these units were organized, there are relatively few caption cards. Record-of-events cards are more numerous, but they sometimes do not contain any account of happenings because no such notation was made in the original records. The compiled service records reproduced in this microfilmed publication are indexed on M818. Roll Description 1 1st Confederate Cavalry A--C 2 D--H 3 I--N 4 O--T 5 U--Y 1st Confederate Regular Cavalry 6 1st Battalion, Trans-Mississippi Confederate Cavalry (1st Battalion, Arkansas and Louisiana Cavalry) 7 3d Confederate Cavalry A--C 8 D--H 9 I--N 10 O--S 11 T--Y 6th Battalion, Confederate Cavalry 12 7th Confederate...

General Index of Pension Files, 1861-1934

The National Archives have microfilm publication of a general index to pension files. The pension applications to which this index applies relate chiefly to Army, Navy, and Marine Corps service performed between 1861 and 1916. Most of the records relate to Civil War service; some relate to earlier service by Civil War veterans; others relate to service in the Spanish-American War, the Philippine Insurrection, the Boxer Rebellion, and the Regular Establishment. There are no Federal pension records for service in Confederate forces. Each card in the general index gives a veteran’s name, rank, unit, and term of service; names of dependent(s); the filing date; the application number; the certificate number; and the state from which the claim was filed. The darker cards relate to naval service. Where to find the Records: You can search microfilm T-288 at the research facilities listed below. Alabama Birmingham Public Library, Tutwiler Collection of Southern History and Literature, 2100 Park Place, Birmingham, AL 35203. California NARA-Pacific Region (San Francisco), 1000 Commodore Dr., San Bruno, CA 94066-2350. District of Columbia National Archives and Records Administration, 700 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20408-0001. Illinois NARA-Great Lakes Region (Chicago), 7358 South Pulaski Rd., Chicago, IL 60629-5898. Indiana Allen County Public Library, Historical Genealogy Department, 900 Webster, P.O. Box 2270, Fort Wayne, IN 46801-2270. Indiana State Library, Genealogy Division, 140 North Senate Ave., Indianapolis, IN 46204. Massachusetts NARA-Northeast Region (Pittsfield), 10 Conte Drive, Pittsfield, MA 01201-8230. Michigan Library of Michigan, 717 West Allegan St., P.O. Box 30007, Lansing, MI 48909. New York New York Public Library, U.S. History, Local History & Genealogy Division, Fifth Ave. & 42nd St.,...
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