Chahta Tribes Of The Gulf Coast

Cha’hta Tribes Of The Gulf Coast



The Chahta Language

Editor’s Note: Cha’hta is a derivative for Choctaw, so the following information is referencing the Choctaw Language. The Cha’hta1 Language, the representative of the western group of Maskoki dialects, differs in its phonetics from the eastern dialects chiefly by the more general vocalic nasalization previously alluded to. Words cannot begin with two consonants; the Creek



Chahta Indian Tribe

Cha’hta Indians



Alibamu Indian Tribe

Alibamu Indians



Apalachi Indian Tribe

Apalachi Indians



The Annual Creek Busk

The solemn annual festival held by the Creek people of ancient and modern days is the púskita, a word now passed into provincial English (busk); its real meaning is that of a fast. In the more important towns it lasted eight days; in towns of minor note four days only, and its celebration differed in each town in some particulars. The day on which to begin it was fixed by the míko and his council, and depended on the maturity of the maize crop and on various other circumstances.



Allophylic Languages Among Southern Tribes

Allophylic Languages Among Southern Tribes 



Kataba Indian Tribe

Kataba is a derivative for Cawtaba, so the following information is referencing the Cawtaba Indians. The Kataba Indians of North and South Carolina are mentioned here only incidentally, as they do not appear to have had much intercourse with any Maskoki tribe. The real extent of this linguistic group is unknown; being in want of any vocabularies besides that of the Kataba, on Kataba river, S. C., and of the Woccons, settled near the coast of N. C.



Cherokee Indian Tribe

Sequoyah

The Cheroki spelling is a derivative of Cherokee, so the following information is referencing the Cherokee Indians. The Cheroki, or more correctly, Tsalagi nation is essentially a hill people; their numerous settlements were divided into two great sections by the watershed ridge of the Alleghany mountains, in their language Unéga katúsi (“white, whitish mountains”}, of which even now a portion is called “Smoky Mountains.”



Linguistic Groups Of The Gulf States

In the history of the Creeks, and in their legends of migration, many references occur to the tribes around them, with whom they came in contact. These contacts were chiefly of a hostile character, for the normal state of barbaric tribes is to live in almost permanent mutual conflicts. What follows is an attempt to enumerate and sketch them, the sketch to be of a prevalently topographic nature. We are not thoroughly acquainted with the racial or anthropological peculiarities of the nations surrounding the Maskoki proper on all sides, but in their languages we possess an excellent help for classifying them.



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